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Students Spent The Entire Summer Texting

Students Spent The Entire Summer Texting | Language Journal | Scoop.it
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Teri Eves's comment, October 9, 2013 5:58 PM
Language Change
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Driving tests in foreign languages banned to stop learners cheating

Driving tests in foreign languages banned to stop learners cheating | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin will ban interpreters in both theory and practical tests from early next year after a series of frauds.

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LOL isn't funny anymore

LOL isn't funny anymore | Language Journal | Scoop.it
John McWhorter says the evolution of "LOL" shows how texting has become a new language

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When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents?

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents? | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Readers Nick and Riela have both written to ask how and when English colonists in America lost their British accents and how American accents came

Via Seth Dixon, Oscar Ma, Jane Wright
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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This article brings up an interesting point on how accents within a given language can be hard to determine, and they can change drastically over time for no apparent reason. In colonial times, because most colonial settlers were English, they would obviously have similar accents to those of the British. While this is the case, over time with exposure to their own practices as well as other societies and their accents, they may have begun to slowly form their own accents. While it is obvious that “American” and “British” accents are inherently different, this was not always so. What caused this shift and when did it occur? It is hard to say, especially with how accents have continued to develop even within the classification of American or British accents. It is hard to determine what is a truly American or British accent because of the numerous regional accents that are present in today’s society. As a result, it is even more difficult to determine when the initial change in accents occurred in our past.
Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 10:47 AM
This is a great question because no one has really dwelled on the question. I like that the people talked about the rhotacism aspect of it because I had never known that before. This is very important because that is the exact way that the British and American languages are different. I think that it is very important to understand this subject because it shows the exact way that we speak differently from British people. I like that the people who discussed the question talked about the history that is involved, or the lack of the history that is involved. The people who truly want to study this question have to read books on this subject because it seems like there is not that much information on it. American speech sounds more modern and middle class to me, while the British language sounds like it is for the upper class.
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:15 AM

I have often wondered if our founders spoke with a British accent. What did George Washington or Thomas Jefferson sound like? Those questions will most likely to continue. to puzzle us for generations to come. This article attempts to show how what we define as an American accent developed. As the article is quick to point out, there are many different regional accents that are evolving everyday. However, there are two main forms of English accents being spoken. There is the standardized received pronunciation, which is the typical British accent. Then there is General American, which is the typical American accent.  The splitting of these two forms occurred basically over 300 year period. By the time the first human voice was recorded, 1860 the two forms sounded very different. There is no way to know the exact point at which the two forms of English began to sound differently.

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What the pronunciation of early modern English reveals about Shakespeare’s plays

What the pronunciation of early modern English reveals about Shakespeare’s plays | Language Journal | Scoop.it
There is no denying that Shakespeare’s vernacular is hard to understand. However, one thing can help: Knowing the original pronunciation (OP) of his sonnets and plays.

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Language of Facebook: Women talk about shopping, men curse - CNET

Language of Facebook: Women talk about shopping, men curse - CNET | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Language of Facebook: Women talk about shopping, men curse CNET The University of Pennsylvania needed to get together with the University of Cambridge in order to embrace all the fascinating language that Facebook's supposed billion have released...
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Entry-level Emirati university students struggle to write in English | The National

Entry-level Emirati university students struggle to write in English | The National | Language Journal | Scoop.it
More than half of all Emirati entry-level university students are anxious about writing in English.
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Hong Kong's English language skills branded 'pathetic' as Chinese has 'negative influence'

Hong Kong's English language skills branded 'pathetic' as Chinese has 'negative influence' | Language Journal | Scoop.it
The English-language skills of Hong Kong's adult population have slumped to the level of South Korea, Indonesia and Japan, according to new rankings of 60 countries and territories....
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Abused Language, Aborted History - PJ Media

Abused Language, Aborted History - PJ Media | Language Journal | Scoop.it
PJ Media
Abused Language, Aborted History
PJ Media
“The abuse of language has got to stop. …We cannot condemn as bigotry everything that we don't agree with. Words like bigotry have to go. …That's what you do.
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'Mind-Reading' Skills Boosted By Reading Literature, Study Suggests - Huffington Post

'Mind-Reading' Skills Boosted By Reading Literature, Study Suggests - Huffington Post | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Brisbane Times
'Mind-Reading' Skills Boosted By Reading Literature, Study Suggests
Huffington Post
Fifty Shades of Grey may be a fun read, but it's not going to help you probe the minds of others the way War and Peace might.
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The 25 Funniest AutoCorrects Of 2012

The 25 Funniest AutoCorrects Of 2012 | Language Journal | Scoop.it
BRB, throwing out my iPhone. (via Damn You, Autocorrect )
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35 Hilarious Chinese Translation Fails

35 Hilarious Chinese Translation Fails | Language Journal | Scoop.it
China is fascinating, and visiting it is bound to leave you with some amazing impressions. Sometimes, however, the English-speaking guests might have some difficulties finding their way around the country.
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Online Adjunct Faculty Faculty - Liberal Arts - English and Literature

Online Adjunct Faculty Faculty - Liberal Arts - English and Literature | Language Journal | Scoop.it
University of Northwestern Ohio


QUALIFICATIONS: 
Potential candidates must have a doctoral degree in English from a regionally accredited institution. (No Education, Adult Learning or Online Instruction Degrees will be considered.) Candidates with online teaching experience at the post-secondary level will be given preference. Training will be provided for candidates who are selected. 


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