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How Challenging Is That Online Text?

How Challenging Is That Online Text? | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
I grab a lot of texts online to use with students. I often wonder, “How challenging is this text? Will my students have trouble reading this text?” In the past, I’d rely on Google’s Advanced Search option that allowed me to search by reading level. Unfortunately, Google dumped this feature, so I’ve been on the hunt for a new way to assess online texts.
Via Deb Gardner
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 27, 2015 1:45 AM

This may be useful for determining the complexity of on-line texts to assist in making sure that we are using more "stretch texts" with students.

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Give me some credit, please! (Students & Plagiarism)

Give me some credit, please! (Students & Plagiarism) | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
"I am usually pretty darn proud of my MLIS students’ work. In going through my grad students’ final workshop presentations this semester, I found one just too useful not to share. So I asked for permission."
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 7, 2015 11:55 PM

At times many of us feel like knocking our heads against the wall when a student hands in work that is plagiarized. This post includes eight GoAnimate videos that discuss plagiarism, from the view of the teacher and the students. Sharing them with staff at your school, or with the students, would promote discussion.

Joyce Valenza has embedded the videos into her post, and also provides a link to a Google presentation as well as a link to a video (on YouTube) which is the actual presentation.

The school year may be winding down, but plagiarism is here to stay. Take some time to review these and consider how you might share them next year.

TWCLibrary's curator insight, June 9, 2015 9:45 PM

Great resources to work with staff and students about plagiarism.

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:50 AM

At times many of us feel like knocking our heads against the wall when a student hands in work that is plagiarized. This post includes eight GoAnimate videos that discuss plagiarism, from the view of the teacher and the students. Sharing them with staff at your school, or with the students, would promote discussion.

Joyce Valenza has embedded the videos into her post, and also provides a link to a Google presentation as well as a link to a video (on YouTube) which is the actual presentation.

The school year may be winding down, but plagiarism is here to stay. Take some time to review these and consider how you might share them next year.

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Building Early Literacy Skills With iPads - ITEACH WITH IPADS

Building Early Literacy Skills With iPads - ITEACH WITH IPADS | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ I am on spring break this week. It has been such a luxury to linger over coffee and the newspaper in the mornings. That has been about all of the luxury I’ve been able to enjoy because even though I’m on spring break from my job, I am not on spring break from doctoral classes. I have been immersed in scholarly articles on early literacy. So, while this is all fresh on my mind, I am going to share a few work samples from some of our recent literacy activities on iPads.”
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Edu-fun Friday: Learning How to Text

Edu-fun Friday: Learning How to Text | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Back after a short hiatus, here’s the latest edition of Edu-fun Friday, a series devoted to adding some humor to the lives of teachers who visit this blog. After all, there’s nothing better than ending the week on a positive note! Plus, do we have the best topics to provide us with some comic relief or what?”
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Fun App for Kids Turns Writing Into Interactive Game | Edudemic

Fun App for Kids Turns Writing Into Interactive Game | Edudemic | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Do your students suffer from writer’s block? I’ve found a cure for what ails them: Writing Challenge for Kids, an app by Literautas. After reading several positive online reviews, I tried this app with my students and got results that surpassed my wildest expectations. With this app, the task of brainstorming a story introduction, scenes, and characters becomes a game. Working against the clock, students respond to specific prompts that guide them through the story-writing process. It’s fun, it’s fast, and, as the name suggests, it’s challenging. Read on to discover if this challenge is right for your students.”
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Shanahan on Literacy: Academic Vocabulary

Shanahan on Literacy: Academic Vocabulary | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
One notion of academic language was that it was any text language (formal book language versus informal oral language). A second conception also separates oral language and text language, but it also sets aside the specialized terminology that belongs to particular disciplines. In that view, words like rhombus and mytosis would be too specialized to deserve much instructional attention. A third conception is that academic vocabulary are the words used to teach and assess, and a fourth is the language that labels the essential content of the various disciplines.
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ReadWorks Adds Vocabulary Lists to Accompany Common Core-aligned Reading Passages

ReadWorks Adds Vocabulary Lists to Accompany Common Core-aligned Reading Passages | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
ReadWorks is a free service that has cataloged hundreds of lesson plans and nearly two thousand reading non-fiction and fiction passages aligned to Common Core standards. Vocabulary lists and lessons are the latest addition to ReadWorks. Now when you select a passage and a lesson in ReadWorks you can find a list of key vocabulary words to go with the passage. Click on a word in one of the vocabulary lists to find its definition and a list of sample uses of the word. At the bottom of the vocabulary list you will find PDF of practice exercises to give to students.
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Shanahan on Literacy: Handwriting in the Time of Common Core

Shanahan on Literacy: Handwriting in the Time of Common Core | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
My father, who had no more than an eighth grade education, wrote in a beautiful Palmer hand. His one-room schoolhouse education did not promise to take him far, but it did allow him to place words on paper in an elegant and readable manner. And, this skill had practical utility beyond its aesthetic beauty, since he worked for many years as a bookkeeper. But the public value of handwriting has diminished during the ensuing century. In fact, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) don’t even mention handwriting, cursive, or manuscript printing. Nevertheless, It is evident that the standards writers expect kids to learn some form of these—since the standards explicitly call for students to engage in written composition; and this would be hard to do if one had no way of getting words on paper.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:00 PM

This is a nice short article with a concise summary at the end. It does not diminish keyboarding and leaves it open that handwriting, in its many forms, is an important skill which enables other skills. It does not mean we won't use digital technologies in writing, but we can include many forms of writing.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Jess Ojeanto's curator insight, September 22, 2014 1:25 PM

agregar su visión ...

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Shanahan on Literacy: Close Reading: A Video Replay

Shanahan on Literacy: Close Reading: A Video Replay | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
Last week I dinged that video for claiming that close reading is a teaching technique (it's an approach to reading). I was critical of the idea that close reading helps students “conquer complex text,” if that includes language complexity as measured by Lexiles. I didn’t like the idea of reading the book to the kids; I’m a fan of reading texts to kids (see recent NewYork Times article on this), but not the texts the kids are supposed to be reading. Finally, I didn’t like how rereading was being approached. Here is the rest of my thinking about this lesson. Hope it’s useful to you.
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3-2-1: A Simple and Effective Summarizing Strategy

3-2-1: A Simple and Effective Summarizing Strategy | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
"...identify three words, two phrases and one quote..."
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 1, 2015 7:56 PM

Check out this activity from The Common Core Writing Book by Gretchen Owocki. One of the activities she suggests is  using a 3-2-1 strategy to help students summarize text. The student must choose three key words, find two phrases that are important and also one quote. They can then share this with a small group, and move to sharing in larger groups. The post suggests that this may used for the following (quoted from the post):

  1.  Summarizing text
  2. Individual accountability for reading
  3. Discourse facilitation
  4. Low-stakes writing
  5. Strategy for comprehending complex and lengthy text
  6. Structure to enable "teacher as facilitator"
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Should we tailor difficulty of a school text to child’s comfort level or make them sweat?

Should we tailor difficulty of a school text to child’s comfort level or make them sweat? | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
This example of leveling—adjusting the difficulty of text to suit the ability of the reader—comes courtesy of Newsela, an online reading program for students in grade three through high school that offers stories about current events “written to multiple levels of complexity.” Although Newsela went live less than 18 months ago, the notion of leveling students’ reading material goes back more than six decades. Today, technology is changing the nature of this long-established pedagogical practice. At the same time, proponents of the Common Core are raising new questions about the educational value of leveling, seconding the standards’ emphasis on having all students grapple with the same “complex texts.”
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, October 16, 2014 12:19 PM

My thoughts: the Common Core does not promote having students read frustrating text all of the time. Indeed, the standards are about stretching our students' capacities but not at the risk of losing all motivation and curiosity to overbearing challenge. Balance is key to growing background knowledge, deepening reading comprehension (which depends on background knowledge), and strengthening reading persistence. Balance, please.

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40+ iPad Apps for Reading Disabilities ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

40+ iPad Apps for Reading Disabilities ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Whether you're the parent of a child with a reading disability or an educator that works with learning disabled students on a daily basis, you're undoubtedly always looking for new tools to help these bright young kids meet their potential and work through their disability. While there are numerous technologies out there that can help, perhaps one of the richest is the iPad, which offers dozens of applications designed to meet the needs of learning disabled kids and beginning readers alike. Here, we highlight just a few of the amazing apps out there that can help students with a reading disability improve their skills not only in reading, writing, and spelling, but also get a boost in confidence and learn to see school as a fun, engaging activity, not a struggle.”
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Shifting Toward An Architecture of Participation

Shifting Toward An Architecture of Participation | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
"Reading, in terms of scale and diversity, is different than it used to be. Thinking, in terms of context and application, is also different.It makes since that learning is also changing–becoming more entrepreneurial than directly didactic. That is, more learner-centered ... than teacher-controlled."
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 8, 2014 11:06 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:27 AM

Shifting Toward An Architecture of Participation

Rescooped by Debbie Williams from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Library of Congress - power of primary sources (Oct. 27/28) - free online conference

“Library of Congress resources for teachers. Professional Development. The Library of Congress and Teachers Online Conference 2015”
Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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27 Word Work Apps for the Elementary Classroom - FRACTUS LEARNING

27 Word Work Apps for the Elementary Classroom - FRACTUS LEARNING | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Whether a teacher uses Daily 5 in the classroom or not, word work is an important piece of student daily learning. This article will provide an extensive list of iOS word work apps. Each app is listed by grade level and state, showing how it will best serve your students while they work with words in the classroom. All apps are free unless otherwise noted.”
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Lee Hall's curator insight, April 10, 2015 12:05 PM

Great sites to use in the classroom or include in a newsletter to parents for practice at home.

Lazona Stovall's curator insight, July 14, 2015 9:15 PM

I love these ideas

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40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies

40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
"You can’t watch a video like you read a book; the modalities couldn’t be much different."
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 2, 2015 11:03 PM

We know that students are now seeing videos as components of online testing. Most students know strategies to use when reading text, but what works best with videos? This post provides 40 comprehension strategies that you may want to teach in your classroom.

The post begins with a short exploration of text and videos and then explores the interaction between video and text. The comprehension strategies are divided into four sections (information below quoted from the text):

* Before viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

* During viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

* After viewing comprehension strategies that promote understanding of video and streaming content.

Each of these sections has ten questions that provide anchor strategies. For example, the first section (before viewing) includes Anchor Strategies: Viewing Purpose, Preview, Predict, Connect
Click through to the post to learn more.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:38 AM

If you are able to use Video in class, these are some things yoiui should think about.

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 28, 2015 12:34 PM

It is important to help students understand how to get the most out of video viewing.

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Three Awesome Apps to Enhance Kids Thinking Skills - (Still Free Saturday!)

Three Awesome Apps to Enhance Kids Thinking Skills - (Still Free Saturday!) | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Below are three excellent iPad apps to boost your kids higher level thinking skills. All of these apps are free today (at least here in Canada and also the US). Some of the things these apps provide include games, puzzles, brain activities all of which are geared towards honing kids conceptual skills such as : reasoning, observation, critical thinking, strategic thinking, and spatial cognition capabilities.”
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Mini-assessment for Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech

Mini-assessment for Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
Includes an excerpt from the book Walk Two Moons, six text-dependent questions, one constructed-response writing prompt, and explanatory information for teachers regarding alignment to the CCSS.
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Shanahan on Literacy: To Teach Comprehension Strategies or Not to Teach Them

Shanahan on Literacy: To Teach Comprehension Strategies or Not to Teach Them | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
What I’m saying is that in the past we taught strategies—overtaught strategies???—but we then asked students to apply them to relatively easy texts (texts at the students' instructional levels). Now, the new standards are asking us to ignore strategies while assigning harder texts.
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:49 PM

Great article on the discussion of teaching reading strategies.

 

Bottom line:  "I would encourage you to continue to teach comprehension strategies as a scaffold for dealing with challenging text. The point would be to make it possible for kids to make sense of truly challenging texts; the use of strategies could be enough to allow some kids to scaffold their own reading successfully--meaning they might be able to read frustration level texts as if they were written at their instructional level."

Pam Foust's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:09 AM

Great response to teaching comprehension strategies.

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Shanahan on Literacy: A Closer Look at Close Reading

Shanahan on Literacy: A Closer Look at Close Reading | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
While I understand the purpose of close-reading I don't understand why you should take the time to read deeper into a document. Some things were written simply and what we now interpret as a symbol, may not have been intended to be a symbol. How can we as readers determine what is meant to be read into and what is to be left alone?
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Why Reading Strategies Usually Don't Help the Better Readers

Why Reading Strategies Usually Don't Help the Better Readers | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Yes, we should teach reading comprehension strategies, even to good readers. But we should do so in an environment that emphasizes the value of knowledge and understanding, and that requires students to confront genuine intellectual challenges. Those disciplinary literacy strategies touted in my last entry seem to have motivation built in: trying to connect the graphics and the prose in science to figure out how a process works; or judging the veracity of multiple documents in history; or determining which protagonist an author is most sympathetic to in literature tend to be more purposeful and intellectually engaging than turning headers into questions or summarizing the author’s message.”
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Stephanie Roberts's curator insight, June 11, 2015 10:13 AM

I teach AP students so I found this interesting.

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Why Handwriting Helps You Learn | Visual.ly

Why Handwriting Helps You Learn | Visual.ly | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
" Nowadays, it's less about putting pen to paper and more about turning on your laptop. But are we losing about by letting the art of penmanship die?"
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 21, 2015 6:24 AM

Cursive writing? Should we teach it or not? Many states are still requiring cursive writing be taught, but it is not part of the Common Core. This infographic provides information about why it is important that students learn cursive.

Bart van Maanen's curator insight, February 21, 2015 10:17 AM

Uit onderzoek is gebleken dat leerlingen lesstof beter opnemen als ze handgeschreven notities maken. Gewoon leren schrijven en het ontwikkelen van je handschrift blijft dus van groot belang.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, February 21, 2015 5:48 PM

Thanks Beth Dichter

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Digital Storytelling and Authentic Assessments - Edutopia

Digital Storytelling and Authentic Assessments - Edutopia | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“ Digital storytelling is a powerful way to engage students in the writing process. Whether they are telling stories from a summer vacation or writing a persuasive essay on a community issue, technology tools can help motivate reluctant writers. Students can use their writing, audio recordings, video creations, illustrations, and images to create a digital storytelling product that demonstrates their understanding of a concept.”
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Free Digital Picture Books for Kids from Unite for Literacy | iGameMom

Free Digital Picture Books for Kids from Unite for Literacy | iGameMom | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
“Unite for Literacy offers free digital picture books for kids, all with professional narration, and have more than 20 language options.”
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Epic: Tons of Books Available on iPad! - teachingwithipad.org

Epic: Tons of Books Available on iPad! - teachingwithipad.org | ELA/Reading/Writing | Scoop.it
"Epic (iTunes link) was created because the developers noticed that when kids used iPads, they were often playing games or viewing videos. They wanted to make it easy for kids to access tons of great books without needing to ask their parents for permission and for money each time a new book is desired. After all, adults often use tablets for reading, why shouldn't kids have the same accessibility when wanting to read? Epic streams thousands of books for kids to explore. Included are easy-readers for early readers. There are non-fiction books too. My son is toddler-aged, and enjoys reading books with simple text, rhyme and repetition."
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