Labor & Delivery Nursing- Aspect 2
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Labor and Delivery Nursing: Interview with Michelle Tibbs

Labor and Delivery Nursing: Interview with Michelle Tibbs | Labor & Delivery Nursing- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Michelle Tibbs, RN, BSN, BSW,  St. Jude Medical Center, Fullerton, Calif.   Tell us about your nursing career.Nursing is a second career for me. My first degree was a bachelor of social work from the...
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Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 10:03 PM
Michelle Tibbs, a nurse in the postpartum unit at the St. Jude Medical Center, revealed the challenges she faces being a labor and delivery nurse. Although the rate of death for babies is low, it is very hard to help comfort the parents if an accident happens in which the baby dies. Most families are not ready to face the sad reality that their child is going to have birth defects, or that the woman will be delivering a baby that is already dead. That's why nurses are there, to the offer emotional support and strength to make it through their suffering.
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Labor and Delivery Nurse

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Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 6:46 PM
Even though for nurses, there are various areas of practice which have many job oppurtinites, labor and delivery will be a tough area to find a job in. Labor and delivery is a very popular area, and many registered nurses are specialized in it. Also, the turnover rate for labor and delivery nurses is decently low compared to other specialties.
Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 6:46 PM
The yearly salary for labor and delivery nurses depends on a few different factors. The average yearly salary is around $55,000. Those who have several years of experience generally make more money, around $70,000. Nuses who have a higher degree, like a masters degree, have higher annual salaries. The area you are working in also plays a role in the yearly salary. Nurses working in metropolitan areas make more money than those working in rural areas.
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Nurses for a Healthier Tomorrow

Nurses for a Healthier Tomorrow | Labor & Delivery Nursing- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
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Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 11, 2013 10:21 AM
Labor and delivery nurses care for women and their newborns during every stage of giving birth. The nurses establish a plan of care for the patient. They work with physicians and other health providers to make sure the patient is getting the right care plan. To make sure the plan is right for the patient, the nurses watch the mother and baby to see if they need to modify anything. Not only do nurses care for patients, but they also give them psychosocial and emotional support.
Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 11, 2013 10:28 AM
Labor and delivery nurses vary, they all assume different roles. A general labor and delivery nurse takes care of patients who have both complicated or uncomplicated deliveries. An antepartum nurse cares for those who are hospitalized due to pregnancy complications. Circulating nurses are required to be in the Operating Room to handle patient care during a cesarean delivery. Scrub nurses pass the correct equipment to the surgeons during a cesarean delivery. Lastly, postpartum nurses care for those who have just delivered.
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Labor and delivery nurses face demands of Planet Birth

Labor and delivery nurses face demands of Planet Birth | Labor & Delivery Nursing- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
For many nurses who specialize in labor and delivery, a fascination with birth is what ultimately draws them to the work.Take Judi Martini, nurse manager of labor and delivery of the neonatal...
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Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 9:24 PM
It is critical to be a competitive applicant for any job within healthcare. Nurses need to have knowledge regarding technology since so many places are using the internet instead of paper. Mathematical knowledge is necessary as well, and keeping up with all the pharmaceutical advancements is important.
Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 9:27 PM
Michele Davidson, associate nursing professor at George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services, recommends offering help and having summer internships to make relations with healthcare buildings. Davidson believes it is more likely to get a job if you're recognized. She suggested that if you are going into nursing that it would be helpful to do research about it first or attend delivery classes so you have some prior knowledge of what you will be doing.
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Professional Goals for a Labor & Delivery RN

Professional Goals for a Labor & Delivery RN | Labor & Delivery Nursing- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Labor and delivery nurses are registered nurses who care for women during pregnancy, through delivery and during their postpartum period. They also provide care for newborns during the neonatal ...
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Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 10:28 AM
The practices for before, during, and after childbirth are constantly changing. Labor and delivery nurses must be educated. Requirements include at least a two-year associate nursing degree from an accredited college or a bachelor of science in nursing from a four-year college or university.
Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 10:28 AM
Education is key, but experience is really needed since every childbirth is unique. Labor and delivery nurses must monitor the mother’s vital signs, checking the baby’s heart rate, recording time between contractions, and administer medications when needed. The National Certification Corporation requires those who want their labor and delivery special certification to have at least twenty-four months of experience in the field before they are eligible to be reviewed for the credentialing examination.
Alexandra Armstrong's comment, March 12, 2013 10:28 AM
According to The American College of Nurse-Midwives childbirth is a normal part of a woman’s life, so it should be honored. It is a goal of labor and delivery nurses to let the process of life happen as natural as possible without interfering. If complications happen, then interfering is necessary. Labor and delivery nurses collaborate with and contact all members of the patient’s health care team to make sure the mother and her newborn are given the best care.
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Teacher Comments

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 9:10 PM
Good job synthesizing info and paraphrasing 30/30