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3D Printers For Living Tissues: Closer and Closer

3D Printers For Living Tissues: Closer and Closer | Biology | Scoop.it
One of the trending topics of the last couple of years has clearly been 3D printing as it has a lot to offer not only in medicine and healthcare but in any industries as well. How useful printing m...
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Here is a frontier of biology. 

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Biology
Evolution is the control of development by ecology.
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Meat'ing future food demands: Emily Cassidy at TEDxUMN

Emily Cassidy has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and is currently finishing up a Master's in Natural Resources Management at the Institute on...
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When you watch this you should be asking questions about statements she makes. 

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The Tyee – Home, Fracked Home: Lost Hair and Dead Cows

The Tyee – Home, Fracked Home: Lost Hair and Dead Cows | Biology | Scoop.it
Alberta landowners say nearby industry has fractured their lives. First in an occasional series.
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Same as the last one. Study is indeed needed and until the studies are complete all fracking should stop. 

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Trouble at the lab

Trouble at the lab | Biology | Scoop.it
“I SEE a train wreck looming,” warned Daniel Kahneman, an eminent psychologist, in an open letter last year. The premonition concerned research on a phenomenon...
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Important articles. Hence much of the push for open science. 

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Stanford researchers' cooling glove 'better than steroids' – and helps solve physiological mystery, too

Stanford researchers' cooling glove 'better than steroids' – and helps solve physiological mystery, too | Biology | Scoop.it
The temperature-regulation research of two Stanford biologists has led to a device that rapidly cools body temperature, greatly improves exercise recovery, and could help explain why muscles get tired.
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For those students interested in sports physiology. 

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15-year-old Victoria student Ann Makosinski wins a top prize in Google's annual global science fair (with video)

15-year-old Victoria student Ann Makosinski wins a top prize in Google's annual global science fair (with video) | Biology | Scoop.it
A Victoria teenager has won one of the top prizes in Google's annual global science fair.
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Start problem solving! 

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Tansn's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:17 PM

To share with students/teachers.

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Latest XPRIZE competition takes on ocean acidification

Latest XPRIZE competition takes on ocean acidification | Biology | Scoop.it

"Entrants will be judged on five criteria: accuracy, precision (repeatability), stability (many sensors drift into error over time), cost, and ease of use. There are actually two separate prizes— $1 million each—that will be awarded based on a subset of these criteria. One purse will go to the team with the best accuracy, precision, and stability, and the other will go to the team whose solution scores best on cost and ease of use." $2 million awaits designers of pH sensors that can gather the data we need.

jlinzel's insight:

I'm not thinking any of my students could really solve this problem....but then again its the process of trying ..and ultimately there is not reason any one of them COULDN'T!

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The $1.3B Quest to Build a Supercomputer Replica of a Human Brain - Wired Science

The $1.3B Quest to Build a Supercomputer Replica of a Human Brain - Wired Science | Biology | Scoop.it

Even by the standards of the TED conference, Henry Markram’s 2009 TEDGlobal talk was a mind-bender. He took the stage of the Oxford Playhouse, clad in the requisite dress shirt and blue jeans, and announced a plan that—if it panned out—would deliver a fully sentient hologram within a decade. He dedicated himself to wiping out all mental disorders and creating a self-aware artificial intelligence. And the South African–born neuroscientist pronounced that he would accomplish all this through an insanely ambitious attempt to build a complete model of a human brain—from synapses to hemispheres—and simulate it on a supercomputer. Markram was proposing a project that has bedeviled AI researchers for decades, that most had presumed was impossible. He wanted to build a working mind from the ground up.

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Complex Controls to Make a Mouse Limb | DNA Science Blog

Complex Controls to Make a Mouse Limb | DNA Science Blog | Biology | Scoop.it

As mutants tend to do, the homeotics teach us what happens normally, but with a special twist that drew me to devote my PhD years to them: the genes that control the sequential formation of body parts are themselves laid out in the exactsequence along the chromosome in which they are deployed as development proceeds.

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A New Step In Evolution

A New Step In Evolution | Biology | Scoop.it
One of the most important experiments in evolution is going on right now in a laboratory in Michigan State University. A dozen flasks full of E. coli are sloshing around on a gently rocking table. ...
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Awesome logitudinal [long term] study on bacterial evolution. 

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The Origin of Life » American Scientist

The Origin of Life » American Scientist | Biology | Scoop.it

As the frontiers of knowledge have advanced, scientists have resolved one creation question after another. We now have a pretty good understanding of the origin of the Sun and the Earth, and cosmologists can take us to within a fraction of a second of the beginning of the universe itself. We know how life, once it began, was able to proliferate and diversify until it filled (and in many cases created) every niche on the planet. Yet one of the most obvious big questions—how did life arise from inorganic matter?—remains a great unknown.

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Are you interested in these ideas? 

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Homework to be completed by Friday, August 16th. Educational Leadership:Early Intervention at Every Age:The Perils and Promises of Praise

Homework to be completed by Friday, August 16th.                                         Educational Leadership:Early Intervention at Every Age:The Perils and Promises of Praise | Biology | Scoop.it

The wrong kind of praise creates self-defeating behavior. The right kind motivates students to learn."

jlinzel's insight:

Steps: 

  • Read the article. 
  • Reflect upon your own mindset
  • State two areas of your life you feel you have a fixed mindset and two areas you feel you have a growth mindset. 
  • Describe steps you can implement to achieve a growth mindset in Biology class. 
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Educational Leadership:Early Intervention at Every Age:The Perils and Promises of Praise

Educational Leadership:Early Intervention at Every Age:The Perils and Promises of Praise | Biology | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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Symbiodinium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The genus Symbiodinium encompasses the largest and most prevalent group of endosymbiotic dinoflagellates known to science. These unicellular algae commonly reside in the endoderm of tropical cnidarians such as corals, sea anemones, and jellyfish, where they translocate products of photosynthesis to the host and in turn receive inorganic nutrients (e.g. CO2, NH4+) (Fig. 1). They are also harbored by various species of sponges, flatworms, mollusks (e.g. giant clams), foraminifera (soritids), and some ciliates. Generally, these dinoflagellates enter the host cell through phagocytosis, persist as intracellular symbionts, reproduce, and disperse to the environment (note that in most mollusks, Symbiodinium are inter- rather than intra-cellular). Cnidarians that are associated with Symbiodinium occur mostly in warm oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) marine environments where they are often the dominant constituents of benthic communities. These dinoflagellates are therefore among the most abundant eukaryotic microbes found in coral reef ecosystems.

Symbiodinium are colloquially called "zooxanthellae" (or "zoox"), and animals symbiotic with algae in this genus are said to be "zooxanthellate". The term was loosely used to refer to any golden-brown endosymbionts, including diatoms and other dinoflagellates. Continued use of the term in the scientific literature should be discouraged because of the confusion caused by overly generalizing taxonomically diverse symbiotic relationships.[1]


Symbiodinium are known primarily for their role as mutualistic endosymbionts. In hosts, they usually occur in high densities, ranging from hundreds of thousands to millions per square centimeter.[2] The successful culturing of swimming gymnodinioid cells from coral led to the discovery that "zooxanthellae" were actually dinoflagellates (Fig. 2A).[3][4] Each Symbiodinium cell is coccoid in hospite (living in a host cell) and surrounded by a membrane that originates from the host cell plasmalemma during phagocytosis (Figs 2B and 3). This membrane probably undergoes some modification to its protein content, which functions to limit or prevent phago-lysosome fusion (Fig. 2B).[5][6][7] The vacuole structure containing the symbiont is therefore termed the symbiosome, and only a single symbiont cell is found within each symbiosome. It is unclear how this membrane expands to accommodate a dividing symbiont cell. Under normal conditions, symbiont and host cells exchange organic and inorganic molecules that enable the growth and proliferation of both partners.

jlinzel's insight:

One of those areas of biology that get near zero coverage by any curriculum today althought the importance is dramatic. They also demonstrate a second example of endosymbiotosis that is easily overshadowed by the focus bestowed to mitochondrion and chloroplasts. I need to integrate this more. 

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Naomi Klein: How science is telling us all to revolt

Naomi Klein: How science is telling us all to revolt | Biology | Scoop.it
Is our relentless quest for economic growth killing the planet? Climate scientists have seen the data – and they are coming to some incendiary conclusions.
jlinzel's insight:

Good read but as always you should want to read the original report generated by Werner and not an interpretation of Werner. Go to the source and make your own interpreatations. The telephone game is not good. 

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The Tyee – Alberta's Oil Legacy: Bad Air and Rare Cancers

The Tyee – Alberta's Oil Legacy: Bad Air and Rare Cancers | Biology | Scoop.it
Sickening carcinogens now saturate the province's Industrial Heartland, study finds.
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The need to RUN away from fossil fuels is not simply CO2 related. Its pollutants related. 

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How science goes wrong

How science goes wrong | Biology | Scoop.it
A SIMPLE idea underpins science: “trust, but verify”. Results should always be subject to challenge from experiment. That simple but powerful idea has generated...
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I have only read a review of these articles from the Economist. I will read them soon and probably have my IB students read them. 

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Genetic Engineering Boosts Ethanol Production by 50 Percent | MIT Technology Review

Genetic Engineering Boosts Ethanol Production by 50 Percent | MIT Technology Review | Biology | Scoop.it
By changing the way certain organisms process sugar, UCLA researchers have shown how to produce more biofuel.
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The new frontier. Huge business and scientific potential. 

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University of Michigan News Service | Microbial team turns corn stalks and leaves into better biofuel

University of Michigan News Service | Microbial team turns corn stalks and leaves into better biofuel | Biology | Scoop.it
ANN ARBOR—A fungus and E. coli bacteria have joined forces to turn tough, waste plant material into isobutanol, a biofuel that matches gasoline's properties better than ethanol. University of Michig
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Awesome biochemistry bioengineering project. 

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Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors : NPR

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors : NPR | Biology | Scoop.it
Snowshoe hares rely on camouflage, turning white in the winter to match the snow, and then turning brown for the summer. But a changing climate could mean fewer days with snow on the ground, and more days when they're visible to prey.
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Using words like variation, mutation, predator, prey, natural selection, descent with modification hypothesize the expected outcome of snow hare evolution. 

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3D Printers For Living Tissues: Closer and Closer

3D Printers For Living Tissues: Closer and Closer | Biology | Scoop.it
One of the trending topics of the last couple of years has clearly been 3D printing as it has a lot to offer not only in medicine and healthcare but in any industries as well. How useful printing m...
jlinzel's insight:

Here is a frontier of biology. 

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Pandoravirus, bigger and unlike anything seen before

Pandoravirus, bigger and unlike anything seen before | Biology | Scoop.it

Pandoraviruses, which are physically and genetically unlike any previously known viruses, are now the biggest known viruses.The discovery of the giant Mimivirus and Megavirus amazed virologists (and also many others). Their virions (750 nanometers) and DNA genomes (1,259,000 base pairs) were the biggest ever discovered, shattering the notions that viruses could not be seen with a light microscope, and that viral genomes were smaller than bacterial genomes.

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The making of an embryo: information and mechanics

Is the general audience “black board” talk at KITP today, giving an overview of the quantitative approches to morphogenesis program currently unverway. Symmetry breaking and mechanics.
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Development of organisms tells us a great deal about how the diversity of metazoans [animals] could have occurred. Genetics explains development. Ecology selects the winning genetic algorithms. We are beginning to understand how it works. 

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The Sports Gene, not as reductive as the title - Gene Expression

The Sports Gene, not as reductive as the title - Gene Expression | Biology | Scoop.it

Sports Illustrated writer David Epstein has a new book out, The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance."

"Though the title seems to imply that athleticism is a single gene trait where most of the variation in the population is due to genetic variation, Epstein denies this and instead presents the reality that athleticism is a complex trait which many dimensions, subject to numerous genetic and environment variables, and, interactions across those variables.That would make for a less sexy subtitle, but it would have had the attribute of being correct."

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You are not ONLY your genes. 

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Computational Biology: Reprogramming Stem Cells ... - Science 2.0

In the beginning, there are embryonic stem cells, which divide and increasingly differentiate as they do so. The ensuing tissue cells remain in a stable state, a skin cell does not spontaneously change into a nerve cell or heart ...
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How big is the “carbon fertilization effect”?

How big is the “carbon fertilization effect”? | Biology | Scoop.it
A new paper by Hemming et al. presents physical, best case limits on the (opposing) effects of warming and CO2 on the “greening” of the biosphere.
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