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Digital Pathology and the Laboratory Medicine Program | The ...

Digital Pathology and the Laboratory Medicine Program | The ... | Lab Med | Scoop.it
Recently, the Laboratory Medicine Program at Lakeridge Health unveiled their fully digital pathology system. As the first hospital in Canada to establish a fully digital pathology laboratory, the new system is going to change ...
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Ten Reasons to Leverage Social Media to Grow Your Medical Practice

Ten Reasons to Leverage Social Media to Grow Your Medical Practice | Lab Med | Scoop.it

1. Social media is here to stay. Studies show that 18 percent of all time spent online is spent on social media; some studies report one in five minutes a day! You need to be there, in front of people, as this is a huge opportunity and the medical field as a whole supports jumping on this form of marketing.

 

2. New patient acquisition is the biggest hurdle for most clinics. Social media is the most cost-effective and targeted way to reach your prospective patients.

 

3. Social media helps you build relationships. Whether with current patients and their families or prospective new patients, social media makes it easy to stay in the forefront of their minds, by lending yourself to becoming a resource. Having a large social media base can even help you to assess adding particular services or products.

 

4. Everyone loves Facebook. A number of reports state that Facebook is the most influential social network with the most diverse user base. Use a personal page to promote your clinic and healthcare providers. Personal pages are more prominent in news feeds and give more opportunity to interact with your fans, i.e. wishing them "Happy Birthday." (It is also important to have a business page (aka a "fan page") for the practice for SEO purposes.)

 

5. Images of office life are the most important pieces of the social media DISCUSSION. People buy from people, not nameless, faceless, soulless businesses. Posting images and pictures of day-to-day life even on a clinic page is key to building a sense of community around your brand.

 

6. Social media influences search engine rankings. And having great search engine rankings improves your chances of being found when Betty types into Google "family practice in XYZ city."

 

7. Social media is the new "search engine." Many people look to social media to find the places and services they are looking for.

 

8. Social media offers the most highly targeted marketing opportunities. Less than a decade ago, if you wanted customers you might have to advertise on the radio or send out mailers. Today, reaching the specific prospective patient you are looking for is simple. You can drill down and target people down to their age, gender, geography, and interests.

 

9. Social media gives you more insight into your patients. By seeing which social media outlets are garnering the most "likes" or discussion feedback on healthcare issues (for example, links to important articles on timely material such as the benefits of the flu vaccine) you can get insight into your patients' worlds. Also: You cannot do it all, so once you have this information, pick two to three social media outlets where your ideal patients hang out, and be great at utilizing those.

 

10. There are people out there to help. For example, our company has a "Teach You to Fish" Program and a "Fish for You" Program to help you develop you social media marketing strategies for your practice.

 

- See more at: http://www.physicianspractice.com/blog/ten-reasons-leverage-social-media-grow-your-medical-practice#sthash.IJPCQNlb.dpuf


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Allison Emma Schizkoske's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:49 PM

I 100% agree with the first point. Social media is here to stay. As well as social media is the new "search engine" People look up products and services on facebook to see what others are saying about them. 

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Pathology: the last digital frontier of biomedical imaging - HispanicBusiness.com

Pathology: the last digital frontier of biomedical imaging
HispanicBusiness.com
Digital pathology is transforming the pathology business.
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Large-scale analysis describes inappropriate lab testing throughout medicine - Science Daily (press release)

Large-scale analysis describes inappropriate lab testing throughout medicine - Science Daily (press release) | Lab Med | Scoop.it
Large-scale analysis describes inappropriate lab testing throughout medicine Science Daily (press release) "Lab tests are used in all medical specialties, affecting virtually all patients," explains senior author Ramy Arnaout, MD, DPhil, Associate...

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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:35 AM

again...

 the large-scale analysis of 1.6 million results from 46 of medicine's 50 most commonly ordered lab tests finds that, on average, 30 percent of all tests are probably unnecessary.

Even more surprising, the results suggest that equally as many necessary tests may be going unordered.

not so surprising

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Spain Cuts Healthcare Expenditures for the Elderly by 7% Using Home Monitoring Platform

Spain Cuts Healthcare Expenditures for the Elderly by 7% Using Home Monitoring Platform | Lab Med | Scoop.it
How are authorities in the Basque Country using technology to care for ageing, chronically ill patients?

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Sam Basta's curator insight, November 19, 2013 9:49 AM

Healthcare Innovation by Design on LinkedIn: 7000+ healthcare delivery and experience innovation leaders sharing the latest information and networking at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Healthcare-Innovation-Design-2579818/about

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Using Health Information Technology to Engage Patients in their Care

Using Health Information Technology to Engage Patients in their Care | Lab Med | Scoop.it

Patient engagement, defined as the process of placing patients at the center and in control of their own healthcare, is becoming a chief healthcare priority


Concurrently, a number of national information infrastructure initiatives are targeting increased patient engagement and the design of health information systems that improve the availability of health information and integrate it in meaningful ways for patients.  So far, these technology goals have been advanced primarily through the design of personal health records (PHRs), patient portals, electronic health records (EHRs), and health information exchanges (HIEs).  However, we remain far from achieving the goal of truly engaging patients in their care.


Generation and exchange of health data with patients is a requirement for Stage 3 EHR meaningful use incentives. Patients are entitled to an electronically generated copy of the record of their encounters with providers. 

 

Sharing provider-generated data with patients is expected to promote patient engagement and accountability, but our own experiences suggest that the data that are being shared are currently a mixed blessing.  For example, one encounter report took the form of a 6-page document in which the vast majority of information was copied and pasted from previous encounters and in which there were several factual errors. The errors will be discussed with the provider during the next visit.

 

Certainly the report got our attention; whether empowerment will result remains an open question.  On another occasion, although the visit itself had included making decisions about future treatment, the plan was not mentioned in the document, leaving the patient to rely on her own memory and notes.

 The National eHealth Collaborative Technical Expert Panel recommends fully integrating patient-generated data (e.g., home monitoring of daily weights, blood glucose, or blood pressure readings) into the clinical workflow of healthcare providers

Although patients want this type of involvement, we have only begun to address their wishes and concerns.  In the next sections, we summarize the current status of several potential building blocks to achieving patient engagement goals and emphasize the role of the nurse informaticist as fundamental to the process.

 

more at the original : http://ojni.org/issues/?p=2848

 



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Brandi Carney's curator insight, January 23, 2014 6:20 PM

This site helps to encourage patients to be more aware of their health by using different pieces of technology.

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4 Reasons Your Healthcare Brand Needs a Social Media Policy

4 Reasons Your Healthcare Brand Needs a Social Media Policy | Lab Med | Scoop.it

Today 31% of healthcare organizations have specific social media guidelines in writing. Regulating and controlling the conversation on social media is an ever-growing responsibility as a brand. The potential for employees to publicly generate stories and conversation about your brand is far more likely, and you have a choice: to either be proactive or reactive. It is your corporate duty to legally set standards on social media.


Social media has led to an increased expectation of transparency in any industry. And for brands in the healthcare industry, it requires treading extremely lightly since the nature of your content is, in general, far more sensitive. Diving head-first into the social space as a health care brand is daunting. It is equally as daunting to consider the extent to which your employees have the ability to share.

Here are four reasons it is essential for your healthcare brand to build an internal social media policy:

 

1. Enforce Existing Policies: Utilize your social media policy to enforce your previously existing policies. Likely, all are able to cross-integrate. Violations across legal concerns such as privacy, confidentiality, and internet usage at work can all tie directly back to social media usage. Your social media policy can and should be enforced as a separate document, however it should also be aligned with all existing regulations.

 

2. Educate and Engage Your Employees: As Likeable Media Talent DirectorBrian Murray stated:  ”Society is shifting in its understanding of how to be professional on social media.” It should no longer be frowned upon for your employees to engage with you as a brand. It should be encouraged to join in the conversation, engage on your social networks, and grow social brand advocates. Social media policies do not have to strictly limit; they can also lay out ways in which employees can and should get involved as well! And if your employees are not as knowledgeable in networking, you can leverage your social media policy to educate your employees about your current social media strategy and vision.

 

3. Regulate Shared Content: Establishing a specific social media policy allows you to regulate the content that is shared. By establishing strict guidelines for anything that is shared regarding the brand, you are able to reprimand for malpractice and ensure that employees understand the consequences associated. Your brand’s credibility, reputation, and image can be drastically harmed by any misleading content shared. Guidelines can also help protect your brand in the future for content that could be stolen and shared later on. Confidentiality should be top of mind for all content regulations set in your social media policy. Not only should you regulate shared content from a brand perspective, you have a responsibility to protect patients and their confidentiality.

 

4. Consumers Expect Online Thought Leadership: There is a fine line to walk when it comes to building your social media strategy as a healthcare brand. One thing is guaranteed: Consumers today go to social media to gain information, and they expect your thought leadership. 60% of social media users are more likely to trust social media posts and activity by doctors over any other group. Your social media policy should outline requirements for users to specify their affiliation with your brand. In order to facilitate social media users associating your brand as a thought leader, it is important that there is consistency and uniformity. Social media policies can even tier expectations based on position within the company, for example: setting standards for verified doctors’ social media content.

 

The content and extent of social media policies vary across industry. As a healthcare brand, it is your responsibility to protect the sensitive nature of your company. These four points are just a handful of the many reasons why your brand needs to regulate via social media policies.


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Creative Disruption? She's 29 and Set to Reboot Lab Medicine - Medscape

Creative Disruption? She's 29 and Set to Reboot Lab Medicine - Medscape | Lab Med | Scoop.it
Creative Disruption? She's 29 and Set to Reboot Lab Medicine
Medscape
The so-called disruptive technology that Ms.

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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:01 AM

future disruption...?

Rescooped by Branko Perunovic from Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section
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Next-generation genome screening is step toward precision cancer medicine for ... - Medical Xpress

Next-generation genome screening is step toward precision cancer medicine for ... - Medical Xpress | Lab Med | Scoop.it
Next-generation genome screening is step toward precision cancer medicine for ...

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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, November 15, 2013 6:10 AM

NGS medicine for precision cancer medicine, and laboratory medicine