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Les chiffres de l’expérience client sur mobile révélés par Google

Les chiffres de l’expérience client sur mobile révélés par Google | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it
Cela fait maintenant 10 ans que le mobile rend la recherche internet accessible en tout temps et en tout lieu. Ce qui place le search bien au coeur du parcours client.

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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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How Google Could Really Help To Reward Original Image Authors Online | Wired.com

How Google Could Really Help To Reward Original Image Authors Online | Wired.com | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it
The battle for fair use is unfair to anyone who plays by the old rules and tries to share with the artists because human creatives can’t compete with the automated services that aren’t sharing with the artists.

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Robin Good's curator insight, August 14, 2013 12:23 PM



Peter Wayner on Wired ponders the issue of fair use from a small, independent publisher point of view and asks some really good questions about what Google could actually do to encourage and reward those who create and bring new insight to the internet — not just those that remix it.


He writes: "What if the researchers at these companies could improve their bots enough for the algorithms to make intelligent decisions about fair use?


If their systems can organize the web and drive cars, surely they are capable of shouldering some of the responsibility for making smart decisions about fair use.


Such tools could help identify blogs or websites that borrow too aggressively from other sites. The search engines that are crawling the net could then use that information to flag sites that cross the line from fair use into plagiarism.


Google, for example, already has tools that find music in videos uploaded to YouTube, and then shares the revenue with the creators.


...


The fair-use algorithms could also honor what the artist wants — for instance, some artists want to be copied. In these cases, a markup language that enumerates just how much the artist wants to encourage fair use could help provide that choice.


That way, those who want rampant copying could encourage it while those who want to maintain exclusivity could dial back the limits."


I can't but agree 110% with these suggestions.


As a curator I feel that there is a strong need for policing fair use and for greater transparency by those who choose to re-use other people content.


I am not for laws, and fines, but yes I am for tools that could tell me who is being fair in re-using and crediting / licensing other people's work, and who is not. Such tools could also motivate me to create more original visual work without fearing that other people would just steal it and re-use it as theirs.


Excellent suggestions. Recommended. Good questions being asked. 9/10


Full article: http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/08/some-arguments-about-fair-use-pit-humans-against-machines/




Asil's curator insight, August 18, 2013 3:43 PM

I love the idea of fair-use algorithms, programmed to respect the meta-data tags of uploaded content. 

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Google ouvre enfin son blog pour les webmasters en langue française

Google ouvre enfin son blog pour les webmasters en langue française | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it

Il s'agit de la source d’informations officielle pour les nouveautés et annonces liées à Google search.

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Learn a few fun facts about Google with this video

Learn a few fun facts about Google with this video | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it
Google is a fascinating company. Its name, for example, is derived from "Googol", which refers to the number 1 followed by 100 zeros. The things that you didn't know about Google. One of the larges...

Via Cendrine Marrouat - cendrinemarrouat.com
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