Kylie's Midsummer Night's Dream
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Clothing of the Elizabethan Era

Clothing of the Elizabethan Era | Kylie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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IMAGE: This picture depicts the clothes that these people in the Elizabethan Era were wearing. This is important to the play because it shows what the people were wearing as they trudged through the woods to get to Athens. They were running around in dresses and uncomfortable clothing. They all saved up all of there money to get to see Shakespeare's play performed.

 

"A Tinge of Silence." : Shakeperean Time. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2013.

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Setting In A Midsummer Night's Dream And The Knight's Tale

Setting In A Midsummer Night's Dream And The Knight's Tale | Kylie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
In Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale and William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, there is an apparent struggle between the world of reason (the world of manmade laws), and the realm of nature, the world outside of...
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 SOURCE: This essay discusses the similarites between a Midsummer Nights Dream and Geoffrey Chaucer's A Knight's Tale. It says that they both used the forest as a transition from the real world to the mystical world. Both plays used the use of fairies to question the audience on whether our world is real. They used the "setting of a wooded area to illustrate that emotions, such as love, become a destructive force when taken outside of the governance of law and reason." Shakespeare also used common characters as Chaucer.

 

"Free Essays Must Be Free!TM." Setting In A Midsummer Night's Dream And The Knight's Tale: The Use Of The Forest Essay. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. 

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Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter

Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter | Kylie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
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HISTORICAL ARTICLE: This article discusses Puck as a character in the Elizabethan Era. Shakespeare used Puck as the fairy kings little minon. He was always doing his dirty work. "Shakespeare did something unusual with Puck; he combined him with another shape-shifter known to the Elizabetban audience—Robin Good-fellow. In Dream, Robin and Puck are the same, but this is the first known linking of the two." This mischevious character was well known across England and was well liked by the audience. He was used in plays throughout the entire Elizabethan Era and not just in Shakepeare's plays.

 

Riley, Dick, and Pam McAllister. "Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter." Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion To Shakespeare (2001): 77-78. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Feb. 2013.

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Mysticism of Happiness

Mysticism of Happiness | Kylie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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LITERARY CRITICISM: This literary criticism talks about how the play is unrealistically written. No one will ever be able to have a love like in this play because there is no such thing. It also gets the audience wondering if their life is real. It begs the question of the fairy world and the real world.

 

"Infobase Learning - Login." Infobase Learning - Login. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2013.

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Scenes from "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Scenes from William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Cast: Elijah Alexander (Oberon/Theseus), Rob Campbell (Puck), Richard Doyle (Robin Starveling)...
Kylie Wortz's insight:

This video puts an interesting spin on "A Midsummer Night's Dream". It makes in moderized simply by changing the costumes and the acting out of all the lines. This makes it relate to people now. Even though the actors did not translate the lines into modern language the audience was still able to understand the meaning of the play.  

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Carter Cianci's comment, March 10, 2013 11:09 PM
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