Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio
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Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio
Computer Mediated Communication
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Identity Development: Linked In Profile

Identity Development: Linked In Profile | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?trk=tab_pro

 

 

My Linked In profile is an example of identity development. As a college senior I knew it was high time I created a networking page aside from Facebook. Linked In is way more professional. Having this profile will help me develop my character. As I grow and gain more volunteer and work experience I will be able to update my page, becoming more marketable in the communications field.

 

This relates to the Pew article, Reputation Management and Social Media. According to this article, “46% of online adults have created their own profile on a social networking site, up from just 20% in 2006”. Also, “66% of people searcher 18-29 say they have searched for someone’s profile on a social or professional networking site…”. It’s a good idea to keep one’s personal life separate from one’s professional life, hence creating a site for work and one for play is necessary. Having a Linked In profile, I can keep potential employers distant from inappropriate message my friends post, since I don’t have to worry about unwanted comments. According to the same article, many users of sites like Facebook, change their privacy setting, delete unwanted comments, and removed their name from tagged photos. With Linked In I can keep thing strictly professional.

 

 

Resources:

 

http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2010/PIP_Reputation_Management_with_topline.pdf

 

 

www.linkedin.com

 

 

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Community Building: Yelp.com profile

Community Building: Yelp.com profile | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it
Krys P.'s reviews of local businesses in New York and beyond on Yelp.

 

http://www.yelp.com/user_details?userid=x0k6UAMxBmHyuNcSeMSbkA

 

 

I signed up and created a profile on Yelp.com. My profile is a great example of community building, simply because it is available to everyone who is seeking the featured information. Community may be thought of as a group of people living together in one place, often times sharing the same religious beliefs, political beliefs, and ideas of society. However in the CMC world Community can be described as a group of individuals who like similar things but don't necessarily share all the same beliefs. My profile in particular is a great example of this. Although each Yelper has Yelp in common we all write different reviews. I can guarantee that no other profile on Yelp.com is exactly the same as mine. Yet we share a community, providing all types of personal reviews about restaurants, bars, salons, museums etc.

 

This relates to the article by Ellison, Steinfield and Lampe, “The Benefits of Facebook Friends: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Networking Sites”. According to the article “social capital refers to the resources accumulated through the relationships among people”. The article also implies that when social capital declines, a community experiences increased social disorder…and greater social capital increases commitment to a community. Yelp.com accumulates reviews from individuals and leave them open to the public. When users are able to read this feedback they feel connected with the individual who wrote the review. Soon enough users will build up a level of trust in the Yelp community and sense belonging. Should a site like Yelp.com not exist people will resort to trial and error and won’t have the privilege of reading a review before trying out a place. This may lead to some disorder. So thanks to my profile and others on Yelp.com for building and maintaining community.

 

 

Resources:

 

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

 

www.yelp.com

 

http://www.yelp.com/user_details?userid=x0k6UAMxBmHyuNcSeMSbkA 

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Web 3.0: Group Facebook page

Web 3.0: Group Facebook page | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://www.facebook.com/beingbullied

 

For the development of my group project on cyberbullying my group and I used Facebook as the mode to get our message across. Facebook is another great example of Web 3.0. Users can download the Facebook application on their Smartphone, as well as log on to Facebook using the Internet on the phone. As long as there is a wireless connection, this is possible. We decided to use this mode since it is easily accessed by many users around the world, and Facebook makes it easy to share content on the go.

 

This mode relates to both the EPN video on YouTube and the nonprofitorgs article. The article and video gives a full rundown of Web 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0. According to the article, “effective donating via Smartphone Apps doesn’t exist yet, but it’s coming. Very soon”. Web 3.0 doesn’t exist by itself; it is simply an advancement of web 1.0 and 2.0. Perhaps, next will be Web 4.0. According to the EPN video, “[The Web] will become less and less visible. No big separate computer, but invisibly present in every day appliances”.

 

 

Resources:

 

"Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits « Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits." Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits. Web. 06 Dec. 2011>

<http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/>

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsNcjya56v8

 

http://www.facebook.com/beingbullied

 

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Filtering/Curating: What is Culture?

Filtering/Curating: What is Culture? | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://delicious.com/krystalbcmc

 

The "defining culture" assignment done on delicious is a great example of filtering and curating. The assignment was for me to find different sources that define culture. After finding the information I picked out exactly what was necessary and added it to the "link" section of my page. Afterwords I added tags that related to the topic and the particular source being displayed. Tags are a great way to narrow down information to just a few keywords, making information easier to locate. I then tweeted my links.

 

This is an example of curation since I selected and organized the information I needed in order to create a small collection of "culture defined".

 

This relates to the article, by Teresa Gorman, on curation. The Editorial Director David Clinch speak about how curating is useful in relation to Storyful. "We spend a huge amount of time curating and validating sources within every country of the world". Curating allows individuals to select only necessary information for presentation. When I think of curating, I think of museums. In that sense, curators select artifacts for different exhibitions.

 

 

Resources:

 

"Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate From Noise| The Rundown News Blog| PBS NewsHour|PBS." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. Web. 05 Dec. 2011. <http://www.pbs.prg/org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html.

 

www.delicious.com

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Informal CMC: My Twitter Page

Informal CMC: My Twitter Page | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

https://twitter.com/#!/krystalb2

 

This twitter page I created is an example of Informal Computer Mediated Communication. The purpose of the page was the keep in touch with my professor and classmates of the Computer Mediated Communication course. This goal was achieved through the use of a hashtag, #uacmc. I only utilized my twitter page on days the CMC 375 class required me to do so. At times I would randomly retweet something interesting I read on Twitter or “mention” one or two individuals in a tweet. As Twitter is a social networking site, it can be considered informal for various reason, according to the Hrastinski article read in class. In no way can this Twitter page be considered formal, except of course for the fact that if I chose to use formal language I could.

 

The Hrastinski article based on formality relates to my class Twitter page. My involvement on the page is not scheduled. I log in and out of Twitter as I like. Random participants can “mention” me or retweet any information tweeted, so long as we follow each other or my page is open to the public. The information on my twitter page isn’t arranged in any particular pattern or order. I never planned to tweet until the appointed time. Interactivity exists since my classmates or I can communicate with one another by using the course hashtag, mentions or even private messages. Since informal communication is described as impromptu and context-rich it is assumed as more likely that such communication is characterized by an experience focus (Hrastinski). I tweeted information on my page based on something that occurred or something that would occur. The language I used was informal, no spell checks or necessary capitalization was used. Therefore my twitter page meets all the requirements for informality discussed in the Hrastinski reading.

 

 

Resources:

 

Exploring Informal And Formal Dimensions Of Computer-Mediated Communication: Towards An Enhanced Model For Research And Practice by Stefan Hrastinski

 

www.twitter.com

 

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Web 3.0: YouTube

Web 3.0: YouTube | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xm4ewobc6_s

 

 

For our group project my group and I created a video and uploaded it on YouTube. To absolutely no surprise I can play this video on a desktop, my laptop and hear this, my Android Smartphone. This is the day and age we live in. YouTube is a great example of the omnipresent web 3.0. The Internet isn’t revolutionary, but rather evolutionary, as web 3.0 is a combination of web 1.0, web 2.0 and web 3.0.

 

This mode of communication relates to the nonprofitorgs article I read for class. Web 3.0 has barely any limitations. As I suggested before I can access the YouTube site in more than one place. Web 3.0 consists of mobile websites, text campaigns and Smartphone Apps. Via the YouTube application on my phone, I can watch my group’s video on the go. Viewers, with accounts can comment, like, or share the video by simply copying and pasting the link.

 

Resources:

 

"Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits « Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits." Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits. Web. 06 Dec. 2011

<http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/>

 

www.youtube.com

 

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Web 2.0: My personal blog

http://krystalbcmc.blogspot.com/

 

My personal blog would be an example of web 2.0 for various reasons. I’m the only one who organizes and publishes new information on this blog. There is room for comments of course. My blog is open to the public, so it doesn’t contain much personal information. A blog can be simply informational. This one was for the purpose of classroom assignments.

 

This mode of communication relates to the nonprofitorgs article I read for class. According to the article “Web 2.0 is the beginning of two-way communication in the online public commons”.  This mode also relates to the EPN videos about the evolution of the web.  Web 2.0 contributes to making the web interactive. With the help of users, commenting, liking, and sharing information the web have grown more interactive over the years. For instance, as Web 2.0 evolves users are able to vlog (a combination of making videos and blogging). Vlogging is the new omnipresent interactive blog.

 

 

Resources:

 

"Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits « Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits." Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits. Web. 06 Dec. 2011.

<http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/>

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsNcjya56v8

 

http://krystalbcmc.blogspot.com/

 

 

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Formal CMC: Skype blog post

Formal CMC: Skype blog post | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://newwaystocommunicatecmc.blogspot.com/2011/09/skypepamela-for-skype.html

 

My blog post about Skype is an example of Formal Computer Mediated Communication, because it meets all the requirements of this category. The purpose of this post was to get the word out about Skype as well as Pamela for Skype. Our class blog is open to the public so my classmates and others have access to this post.

 

The Hrastinski article based on formality relates to my blog post. I knew I had to post my first blog (Skype) by a certain date, therefore the task of writing the blog was scheduled in advanced.  I was the person designated to write a post.  Before writing down everything I wanted to say about Skype I first had to find the information from sources, hence my agenda was preset. This post was mandatory; as it would affect my grade in the future. I organized it and focused my attention on the content. Hrastinski’s articles gave several examples of formal and informal dimensions of CMC.  Those examples were related back to the “formal and informal chart” to see which criteria they matched. I matched my blog post assignment with the formal side of CMC.

 

Resources:

 

Exploring Informal And Formal Dimensions Of Computer-Mediated Communication: Towards An Enhanced Model For Research And Practice by Stefan Hrastinski

 

http://newwaystocommunicatecmc.blogspot.com

 

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CMC Language: Personal Facebook Page

http://www.facebook.com/blissKRYS?ref=tn_tnmn

 

 

My personal Facebook page shows examples of Computer Mediated discourse. According to the Computer-Mediated Discourse article by Susan Herring, “Computer-mediated discourse is the communication produced when human beings interact with one another by transmitting messages via networked computers”. The moment I sit in front of a computer, the first place I log on to is Facebook to check for notifications. As all Facebook pages are, mine is text-based. I communicate with people on my friends list through chat, private message, or posting directly on their walls. Another reason my personal Facebook counts as CMD is because of the use of Emoticons in my statuses. My personal Facebook page is also a great example of synchronous and asynchronous communication. Chat occurs simultaneously meanwhile private messages occur with a delay after each message.

 

Social interaction occurs in CMD although we may not even notice it. Of course interaction on Facebook isn’t the same as interacting physically, but it can be just as effective. The article mentions that “participants negotiate intimidate, joke, tease, flirt, [have sex, and get married] on the Internet…without having ever met face-to-face”. This is very true. When I make my status: Zzzzz everyone would assume that z’s imply snoozing or bedtime. Another status could be: Jasmine J. bought me the prettiest necklace for Christmas *hugs*. This would imply that I hugged Jasmine, not physically, but virtually. In addition to typed actions the article mentions emoticons, which are throughout postings on my Facebook page. “The best known of [compensatory strategies to replace social cues] is the use of emoticons…composed of ascii characters (Herring, 11).” For instance =) -_- o_o :-p and many others, even ones that wiggle on the screen. These little emoticons signal many things and to no surprise most people in the CMC world understand them since we all share the CMD. Language is very important in Computer Mediated Communication.

 

 

Resources:

 

Computer-Mediated Discourse by Susan C. Herring http://www.let.rug.nl/redeker/herring.pdf

 

 

www.facebook.com

 

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Networking: LinkedIn profile

Networking: LinkedIn profile | Krystal B. CMC 375 Final Portfolio | Scoop.it

http://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?trk=hb_tab_pro_top

 

 

LinkedIn is the perfect example of networking. In my own words, LinkedIn is a social networking site that connects individuals in the professional world. My LinkedIn page shows as much information about me as I let it. I have the options to post my employment history, upload my resume, ask for recommendations, or even link other possible social network accounts. I can build my network via this account by adding classmates, colleagues, or friends. These additions are also known as my connections, thus far I only have 8, but they will continue to grow. I can even add individuals whom I aspire to work with. If there’s great information on one’s LinkedIn page this is a sure plus and the next step to potentially landing an interview.

 

This relates to the Danah M. Boyd reading, Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. “…Professional sites such as LinkedIn…focus on business people” (Boyd, 216). The article contains a graph that shows the launch dates and even relaunche dates of several SNS’s (Social networking Sites). LinkedIn was launched in the year 2003. The article suggests that social networking sites have become deeply embedded in user’s lives. Facebook reunites individuals and maintains ties. However LinkedIn is a great example of a way to maintain old and build new beneficial relationships. “What makes social networking sites unique is not that they allow people to meet strangers, but rather they enable users to articulate and make visible their social networks”(Boyd, 211). Networking is important in this day and age, because to get where you want to be it’s not necessarily what you know, but often times who you know. As my LinkedIn profile improves, my network will continue to grow.

 

 

Resources:

 

boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.html

 

www.linkedin.com

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