Asian Popular Culture
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by CeeFu
onto Asian Popular Culture
Scoop.it!

Roundtable: 2NE1 vs. SNSD

Roundtable: 2NE1 vs. SNSD | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
It’s been a while since we had such a matchup of industry titans going head to head.
CeeFu's insight:

This article features various opinions about the simultaneous comebacks of two of K-pop's most successful and popular girl groups. Members refer to the "anti-aegyo" discourse often targeted to SNSD, as well as the continued use of the "fierce" concept for 2NE1. Described as a competition between the two girl groups, it overlooks the fact that some fans like both groups. 

more...
No comment yet.
Asian Popular Culture
K-pop, K-drama, Anime, Chinese and Hong Kong Drama
Curated by CeeFu
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Can Korean animation break into the US market?

Can Korean animation break into the US market? | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
By The Korea Times Los Angeles staff Do Korean animated characters like Pororo and the Larvas have what it takes to break into the American market?
CeeFu's insight:

Korean animation may face more competition from Japanese animation than from domestic animation in an American market.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

EXO To Appear On 'Yoo Hee Yeol's Sketchbook' For First Time Since Debut

EXO To Appear On 'Yoo Hee Yeol's Sketchbook' For First Time Since Debut | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
The idol group will perform live and talk to the show's host.
CeeFu's insight:

This will be interesting. Because artists are expected to perform live, Sketchbook functions as a litmus test for some to see if artists are really talented. Idols have made frequent appearances on the show. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Korean culture conference makes Japan debut (2015/04/26)

A file photo of KCON, a business convention on Korean cultural content that includes a K-pop concert, held in Los Angeles last year.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Girls' Generation Show Off Their Dance Skills In 2015 Comeback 'Catch Me If You Can' Music Video

Girls' Generation Show Off Their Dance Skills In 2015 Comeback 'Catch Me If You Can' Music Video | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
The 2015 comeback single "Catch Me If You Can" is still days away from release but the music video is now streaming.
CeeFu's insight:

The new dance-intense video by Girls Generation hearkens back to earlier videos like "Into the New World." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

The Daily Beast Takes on Black K-Pop Fans?

The Daily Beast Takes on Black K-Pop Fans? | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Hear those rap interludes, ultra-catchy choruses, and dance breaks? MisterPopoTV is here to show you that African Americans can be into Korean pop music.
CeeFu's insight:

It’s nice when major news outlets recognize that black K-pop fans are part of the general K-pop fandom. However, this piece trades in overused tropes about race and K-pop.  Many of the black K-pop fans I know would not recognize themselves in this piece. However, they would recognize the repeated assumptions made about African Americans and K-pop.

 

This piece reinforces the notion that it is strange for African Americans to like K-pop, even as it tries to disabuse readers of that notion. Given that K-pop utilizes R&B and hip-hop and that K-pop artists have been collaborating with black music artists since the 1990s, it should surprise no one that K-pop has black fans.  In addition to the K-pop’s godfather, Seo Taiji, artists such as uber-producer Yoo Young Jin, first generation girl group Baby V.O.X and pioneer hip-hop group Jinusean collaborated on tracks with African American artists.  Often, these collaborations occur on albums, not on promoted tracks where casual K-pop fans spend most of their energy.

 

The piece also features black K-pop fans who share their views on the web via YouTube and tumblr. While they are the most visible on the Internet, they are not necessarily the most representative.  Like most global K-pop fans, black K-pop fans access their K-pop through the Internet, but do not participate in K-pop via the Internet. Many do not make reaction videos, write about K-pop or leave comments on social media. In other words, a more realistic look at black K-pop fans would be to see who shows up to concerts, or track their viewing habits, something increasingly difficult with the changes in the information provided by analytics of social media sites.

 

Moreover, while hip-hop has a clear impact on K-pop, R&B has even more. All of the Big Three Korean agencies produce groups that delve into a variety of R&B genres. This makes sense, especially for those seeking wide mainstream appeal. Despite its long and staid history, hip-hop is still viewed by some as youth culture that challenges authority and the status quo, something that turns off older generations.  However, a wider variety of people find soul ballads or even R&B-inspired dance tracks appealing.  By suggesting  “the genre’s hip-hop influences act as a gateway drug,” it ignores the wide variety of music within K-pop as well as the ability of black fans to like aspects of K-pop that do not involve hip-hop. 

The article also continues to promote the reductive argument that combines misappropriation, authenticity and K-pop.  Given that both black culture and K-pop are hybrid types of cultural production, drawing hard and fast rules who can and cannot borrow and under what circumstances is nearly impossible, as consensus is hard to come by.  Are black K-pop fans required to express “a genuine desire to connect” with Korean culture? When the article takes the expected turn to blackface in Korean popular culture, it makes it seem that racism runs rampant in K-pop, and in doing so, recycles this tired cliché about race and K-pop:  “Incidents of blackface and other similarly offensive events happen so often in Korean pop culture that one might attribute it to some sort of cultural naiveté or ignorance of historical context.”  There are far more incidents of blackface in the country that originated it than in Korean pop culture and the article distorts instances of blackface to make a false point about racism and K-pop.

Black K-pop fans are quite savvy and diverse, and this article only shows a glimpse of them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

K-pop and the Middle East: The Foray

K-pop and the Middle East: The Foray | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
When ZE:A announced that they were traveling to the United Arab Emirates for a fan sign – my immediate thought was “Who’s gonna turn up?”
Thousands did.
CeeFu's insight:

K-pop continues its spread around the world, and this article examines recent forays of K-pop artists into the region.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

The Way Forward: Sam Hammington

The Way Forward: Sam Hammington | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
The entry of non-Koreans in to the Korean entertainment scene has gained a steady momentum in the past few years. These non-Koreans have mainly stuck to the idol industry — debuting with girl and guy groups too many to mention.
CeeFu's insight:

Just some questions: Why is Korean entertainment obligated to embrace non-Koreans in its industry? Are other national entertainment industries obligated to do the same? if so, how is the United States, home of Hollywood, one of the biggest entertainment industries on the planet, doing with embracing international stars into its entertainment industry?  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Super Junior talks to gov't

Super Junior talks to gov't | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Super Junior, Left to Right : Choi Si-won, Eun-hyuk, Sin Dong-hee, Sungmin, Henry and Zhou Mi Members of the K-pop group Super Junior visited the National Assembly in Yeouido, western Seoul, yester
CeeFu's insight:

K-pop artists frequently represent not just sources of entertainment for fans, but also participate in government conversations related to Hallyu, the Korean wave. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

The 1960′s American K-Pop Tale of “The Kim Sisters”: From Post War Korean Poverty to USA Prime Time

The 1960′s American K-Pop Tale of “The Kim Sisters”: From Post War Korean Poverty to USA Prime Time | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
If asked “What is the first Korean music you were introduced to?” how would you respond? Fans from the 90′s might say H.O.T., Seo Taiji and Boys, g.o.d, Fin.k.l and etc.
CeeFu's insight:

This is a great article about the Kim Sisters, showing the lesser-known aspects of Korean celebrity before Hallyu-era K-pop idols. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Princeton professor’s take on K-Drama

Princeton professor’s take on K-Drama | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Endings are often too “corny,” and the really bad characters are forgiven too easily   By Park Si-soo A lecture presentation written in English popped up on Facebook several weeks ago, instantly taking Korean users of the social network website by...
CeeFu's insight:

K-dramas have large followings among a diverse audience. Here in the United States, K-drama viewership is up. The article seems to be more of a personal take on K-dramas, but overlooks some of the other reasons why viewers watch K-drama, reasons that include the high production values, global locations and the glimpses into Korean society. Many K-drama viewers watch modern K-dramas, and tend to like the romantic comedies and melodramas more so than historical K-dramas. Those who watch historical K-dramas like the narratives as well as the costuming and historic settings. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Gummy Leaves YG and Signs Exclusive Contract with JYJ’s C-JeS Entertainment

Gummy Leaves YG and Signs Exclusive Contract with JYJ’s C-JeS Entertainment | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
It’s official! Gummy will be joining JYJ at C-JeS Entertainment.
K-Pop officials confirmed on October 24 Gummy has signed an exclusive contract with C-JeS Entertainment.
CeeFu's insight:

This particular move is interesting. YG has  reuptation for giving its artist more creative freedom, yet Gummy did not renew her contract. Instead, Gummy becomes the second musical act represented by C-JeS. One can only speculate as to what motivated her decision, but this challenges the notion that artists never have the freedom to make such decisions. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Album Review: Drunken Tiger's "The Cure"

Album Review: Drunken Tiger's "The Cure" | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
After a four-year hiatus and hot on the heels of Tiger JK’s departure from Jungle Entertainment, Drunken Tiger returns with The Cure, the “group”’s ninth release.
CeeFu's insight:

While we can all disagree on the technical or aesthetic aspects of music and have different opinions on what is good or bad, this article reflects the tendency to reduce hip hop to just one mode. Even as it identifies Tiger JK's personal travails as inspiration for the release, it blasts the The Cure because of its lack of "acid flows, endless cool, and sick production."  Erika explains that "the emotional sentiments are as hackneyed as the beats, not because Tiger JK comes from a place of insincerity, but because the audience has been there, done that, and come home with the t-shirt." Overall, Erika says that this album is not up to Tiger JK's previous work because its too mello and not "bombastic" enough. 


Such opinions represent a refusal to allow hip-hop to grow and change. It keeps hip-hop on one setting, and discourages innovation, or even anything that deviates from a norm that defines hip-hop as hard. We've seen this before, when the norm became gangster rap, and other modes fell to the wayside, and many regret that turn. As Mark Anthony Neal once said, hip-hop has a mortgage. If it is truly a mode for personal expression, then it follows that personal circumstances change, and it may not be as important to talk about what's going on in the club anymore. In addition, the relentless quest for "something new" from artists is just unrealistic to maintain, and at some point, artists of a certain level cease to have to prove themselves. 

 

If we are going to talk about Tiger JK's dialogue with various musical traditions, I would expect the musical knowledge of writers to be wide and varied enough to bring a critical eye to the musical traditions at play, musical references that go beyond the 1980s. 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

TVXQ’s Yunho Once Again Proves His Performance King Status in Short MV of Solo “Burning Down”

TVXQ’s Yunho Once Again Proves His Performance King Status in Short MV of Solo “Burning Down” | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
TVXQ’s Yunho has released the short PV of “Burning Down” for his first solo mini album “U KNOW Y!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

China Blacklists Attack on Titan, Death Note, 36 More Anime/Manga

China Blacklists Attack on Titan, Death Note, 36 More Anime/Manga | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Highschool of the Dead, Assassination Classroom, Terror in Resonance also banned from distribution
CeeFu's insight:

All popular culture does not travel well. China, known for its restrictions on incoming culture, has banned several popular titles, including Attack on Titan, Afro-Samurai and Sword Art Online II. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

SM Rookie Mark Lee Speaks To ABC News About What Makes K-Pop Stars Different From Overseas Musicians

SM Rookie Mark Lee Speaks To ABC News About What Makes K-Pop Stars Different From Overseas Musicians | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Lee is a teenager training to be a K-pop star at SM Entertainment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

‘Wondaland,’ Hip-Hop and Korea: An Interview with MFBTY

‘Wondaland,’ Hip-Hop and Korea: An Interview with MFBTY | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
MFBTY has a longstanding history in the Korean hip-hop scene, as individuals and as a unit. So their latest album Wondaland and single “Bang Diggy Bang Bang” were met with much anticipation and unsurprisingly met with many accolades.
CeeFu's insight:

The group reveals the musical exchange between K-pop and Korean hip-hop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Epik High's Tour Announcement Via Snapchat Highlights The Social Media Platform's Growing Popularity Among K-Pop Acts

Epik High's Tour Announcement Via Snapchat Highlights The Social Media Platform's Growing Popularity Among K-Pop Acts | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
In addition to the YG Entertainment hip-hop group, miss A’s Min, f(x)’s Amber and BTOB's Peniel have also started posting public Snapchat updates.
CeeFu's insight:

Technology is key to the spread of K-pop globally. In addition, different platforms of social media target different demographics, so it would be interested to know if K-pop groups are using social media with these targets in mind.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Is MBC's Lip Sync Ban Good for Global Fans?

Is MBC's Lip Sync Ban Good for Global Fans? | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
In a possible industry changing move, the MBC Show! Music Core chief executive producer (CP) Park Hyun-suk made a statement earlier this week pronouncing that the show is not going to allow singers or artists on stage that rely solely on MR (music recorded). According to him, about 10-20 percent of the singers who go …
CeeFu's insight:

Producers for MBC’s Show! Music Core may think that its decision to ban acts that use MR (music recorded) is a good one, but such a move makes assumptions about what viewers expect from such performances.

 

Expectation is key. While one may have an expectation of a live vocal performance by someone singing a national anthem at an event, one may not have the same expectation for a live vocal performance in a different setting. Producers may think lip-synced performances on Show! Music Core are misleading, but that assumes that viewers expect these performances to be live vocal performances.  Do viewers expect such performances to be live vocal performances?  Many viewers look forward to such performances for other reasons. These shows have a long tradition of being a showcase for a variety of performances, which represent a combination of vocals, styling and choreography.  Many global viewers tune in for this combination, as many will never have the opportunity to see such acts perform live in their country. 

 

In addition to vocal reality shows, there are other outlets to experience the vocal talents of idols.  The format of Yoo Hee Yeol’s Sketchbook is specifically designed to allow artists groups to showcase their live vocals, and has hosted a variety of acts, from individuals known for their vocals such as Lyn, Park Hyo Shin and Hwanhee, to hip-hop acts such as Drunken Tiger and Dynamic Duo, to K-pop idols such as Girls’ Generation, Wonder Girls and 4Minute.  Idols also have opportunities to sing live on radio shows such as ShimShimTapa, performances that are also video-recorded and accessible through YouTube.

 

As the article suggests, this may have an impact on choreography-heavy comebacks for groups if this is undertaken as an industry standard, which will not be good for global K-pop fans who routinely cite choreography as one of the appealing aspects of K-pop. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Michael Porter and K-pop: An Analysis

Michael Porter and K-pop: An Analysis | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
K-pop is a business, through and through. No matter how original a concept is or how natural fan interactions may seem, the details even down to how much a performer weighs are all calculated.
CeeFu's insight:

This article begins by looking at K-pop through an economic lens, but falls into a familiar trend of boiling the success of K-pop down to profits and business models and echoing the much-repeated mantra about the manufactured nature of K-pop. At the same time, it leaves out the key to the global spread of K-pop, namely the fans, who have exerted tremendous influence on K-pop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Roundtable: 2NE1 vs. SNSD

Roundtable: 2NE1 vs. SNSD | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
It’s been a while since we had such a matchup of industry titans going head to head.
CeeFu's insight:

This article features various opinions about the simultaneous comebacks of two of K-pop's most successful and popular girl groups. Members refer to the "anti-aegyo" discourse often targeted to SNSD, as well as the continued use of the "fierce" concept for 2NE1. Described as a competition between the two girl groups, it overlooks the fact that some fans like both groups. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

How to Navigate Symbolism in K-pop MVs

How to Navigate Symbolism in K-pop MVs | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it

This A music video has a limited amount of time to make a lasting impression.

CeeFu's insight:

This article attempts to critically read symbolism in recent K-pop music videos. While all interpretations are not valid, some can be said to be invalid if not supported by MV itself.  Grad students exposed to literary criticism may recognize this. They may also remember that what the artist (or author) may have intended cannot be reliably discerned (intentional fallacy, anyone?). The article alludes to the importance of details for any interpretation, but fails to note that symbolism is also dependent on cultural context. In other words, does the writer's reading of the use of red take into account what that may mean in Korean or East Asian cultures? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

The Korean Wave does not really exist

The Korean Wave does not really exist | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
The Korean music scene has changed vastly in the past decade.
CeeFu's insight:

While this article attempts to address the varied uses of the term "Korean wave," it does not address the complex factors that go into the term.  It fails to define the Korean Wave itself, its links to multiple modes of cultural production, such as K-drama and Korean film. The Korean wave is more than a mere marketing tool; it is a phenomenon that has economic, cultural and political implications. Using Psy to make an argument about the Korean wave and its longevity ignores the 20-ish old years of music, television and film that make up the Korean wave, and the fact that K-pop was enjoying global popularity before Psy's appearance. There needs to be more context provided to make these kinds of assertions about the Korean wave. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Epik High Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary with a Video Message

Epik High Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary with a Video Message | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Once a musician, always a musician. October 23 marked Epik High’s 10 year anniversary.  On October 22, Epik High’s official Youtube channel posted a short video with the message “Thank you for the memories” to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of...
CeeFu's insight:

The fan dynamic from Epik High can be described as low-key in relation to idol groups and artists. Yet the fan message is a tried and true strategy. Epik High's message is less a direct message to the fans and more of a peek into their creative world. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CeeFu
Scoop.it!

Why is the human body such a horrible thing nowadays? You show a bit of skin and you're considered a slut? And to blame everything on American music, really? Kpop fans annoy me sometimes.

Why is the human body such a horrible thing nowadays? You show a bit of skin and you're considered a slut? And to blame everything on American music, really? Kpop fans annoy me sometimes. | Asian Popular Culture | Scoop.it
Who knows? It’s especially worse in Korea, as we’ve seen with banned costumes, music videos, dances, ect. Especially with Hyuna.
CeeFu's insight:

There are people who like K-pop precisely because it is devoid of the focus on the body that some see in music in the United States. While the United States may not be directly to blame, it does have a large influence in global culture. 

more...
No comment yet.