Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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Virtual reality puts human in rat world: 'Beaming' technology transforms human-animal interaction

Virtual reality puts human in rat world: 'Beaming' technology transforms human-animal interaction | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Using cutting-edge virtual reality technology, researchers have "beamed" a person into a rat facility allowing the rat and human to interact with each other on the same scale.
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Is China more legitimate than the West?

Is China more legitimate than the West? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

China and the United States are about to choose new leaders via very different methods. But is a candidate voted for by millions a more legitimate choice than one annointed by a select few, asks Martin Jacques.

This week will witness an extraordinary juxtaposition of events. On Tuesday the next American president will be elected. Two days later, the 18th congress of the Chinese Communist Party will select the new Chinese president and prime minister.

The contrast could hardly be greater.

Americans in their tens of millions will turn out to vote. In China the process of selection will take place behind closed doors and involve only a relative handful of people.

You are probably thinking, "Ah, America at its best, China at its worst - the absence of democracy. China's Achilles heel is its governance. This will be China's downfall."

I want to argue quite the contrary.

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Your future smartphone and tablet will have 48 cores: Intel | KurzweilAI

Your future smartphone and tablet will have 48 cores: Intel | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Single-chip cloud computer (credit: Intel) Intel researchers are working on a 48-core processor for smartphones and tablets --- making them many times more...
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Nuclear Fusion Project Struggles to Put the Pieces Together: Scientific American

Nuclear Fusion Project Struggles to Put the Pieces Together: Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Contracting woes may cause further delays for $19.4-billion ITER, a project designed to show the feasibility of nuclear fusion as a power source...
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Sahara solar plan loses its shine

Sahara solar plan loses its shine | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Siemens’ decision to pull out of DESERTEC reignites doubts.
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IBM Breaks Another Barrier in Its Race to Beat Moore’s Law

IBM Breaks Another Barrier in Its Race to Beat Moore’s Law | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
IBM has successfully created a processor powered by 10,000 carbon nanotubes instead of silicon transistors.
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Sequencing the Connectome | KurzweilAI

Sequencing the Connectome | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Converting connectivity into a sequencing problem can be broken down conceptually into three components.
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Sci-fi writers help scientists bridge gap between fantasy and reality - CNN.com

Sci-fi writers help scientists bridge gap between fantasy and reality - CNN.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A new research body at Arizona State University is aiming to bridge the gap between the science lab and the most evocative inventions of the sci-fi genre.
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First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed | KurzweilAI

First micro-structure atlas of the human brain completed | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Rendering of long white-matter fiber bundles (credit: CONNECT) European scientists have built the first atlas of white-matter microstructure in the human...
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Constructor Theory | Conversation | Edge

Constructor Theory | Conversation | Edge | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

There's a notorious problem with defining information within physics, namely that on the one hand information is purely abstract, and the original theory of computation as developed by Alan Turing and others regarded computers and the information they manipulate purely abstractly as mathematical objects. Many mathematicians to this day don't realize that information is physical and that there is no such thing as an abstract computer. Only a physical object can compute things.

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Buddhas 2600th enlightenment day A robot blesses the masses

Buddhas 2600th enlightenment day A robot blesses the masses | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Assuming the tremendous advances in computing power and robotics continue unhindered for the foreseeable future, what would it feel like to have a real Buddha teacher robot?
Furthermore, assuming that we can create a robot Buddha, having all the characteristics and features of that which is considered an enlightened state amongst those that think about such things, will we accept its authority?


Strange questions indeed, and yet strange as these issues might seem presently, I do believe they pose an interesting challenge to our sense of aesthetics and our sense of the perennial.

The image of the robot and the praying alms-offering pilgrims, monks and nuns around it, is to a certain extent more disturbing because it appears so natural, so, in its correct place.

It makes sense.

 

"I believe robots have the buddha-nature within them—that is, the potential for attaining buddhahood,"

 

This quote from the book : The Buddha in the Robot: a Robot Engineer's Thoughts on Science and Religion by Masahiro Mori (森 政弘) (a Japanese roboticist noted for his pioneering work on the emotional response of humans to non-human entities, as well as for his views on religion and robots. The ASIMO robot was designed by one of Masahiro's students).

 

I made a small non-scientific experiment; I have shown this image to a few people asking what they think is seen in the picture. Surprisingly enough not one of the persons involved raised any questions concerning the Robot. One asked an interesting question however:” how long before I can have my own personal Buddha robot teacher?”

 

I am uncertain as to the realism involved in having a Buddha Robot teacher, though truth to tell I could find no argument against it (no argument that holds water that is).

 

In trying to clarify the issue at hand I find myself wondering about the propositions that might be entailed by such a new reality, a reality where robot Buddhas perform rituals and teachings.

 

Think about it for a moment, what would happen if in conjunction with having huge armies of drones busy performing acts of surveillance and outright violence, a concomitant army of Buddha teachers performing acts of compassion and benevolence is deployed in the world?

 

Let me know what you think.

 

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Finland’s Next Laws To Emerge From Online Crowdsourced Proposals

Finland’s Next Laws To Emerge From Online Crowdsourced Proposals | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Why isn’t that a law? You may have muttered this phrase or heard someone else say it out of frustration, but chances are that question has popped up in conversation in one form or another.
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New Scientist TV: 3D fetus fly-through peers inside abnormal bodies

New Scientist TV: 3D fetus fly-through peers inside abnormal bodies | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Thanks to MRI techniques, you can see what a baby looks like before it's born. But now these images can also be used to peer inside the body of a fetus, generating a fly-through of internal tissues that rivals the view you would get from a video.

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The most important education technology in 200 years | KurzweilAI

The most important education technology in 200 years | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Education is about to change dramatically, says Anant Agarwal, who heads edX, a $60 million MIT-Harvard effort to stream a college education over the Web, free, with plans to teach a billion students, Technology Review reports.

“Massive open online courses,” or MOOCs, offered by new education ventures like edX, Coursera, and Udacity, to name the most prominent (see “The Crisis in Higher Education”) will affect markets so large that their value is difficult to quantify.

A quarter of the American population, 80 million people, is enrolled in K–12 education, college, or graduate school. Direct expenditures by government exceed $800 billion. Add to that figure private education and corporate training.

At edX, Agarwal says, the same three-person team of a professor plus assistants that used to teach analog circuit design to 400 students at MIT now handles 10,000 online and could take a hundred times more.

Coursera, an alliance between Stanford and two dozen other schools, claims that it had 1.5 million students sign up.

Changing the world

The rise of the MOOCs means we can begin thinking about how free, top-quality education could change the world.

Khan’s videos are popular in India, and the MOOC purveyors have found that 60 percent of their sign-ups are self-starters from knowledge-hungry nations like Brazil and China. Nobody knows what a liberal application of high-octane educational propellant might do. Will it supersize innovation globally by knocking away barriers to good instruction? Will frightened governments censor teachers as they have the Web?

The eventual goal isn’t to stream videos but to perfect education through the scientific use of data. Just imagine software that maps an individual’s knowledge and offers a lesson plan unique to him or her.

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Why We Have An Open Wireless Movement | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Why We Have An Open Wireless Movement | Electronic Frontier Foundation | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The Open Wireless Movement envisions a world where people readily have access to open wireless Internet connections—a world where sharing one's network in a way that ensures security yet preserves quality is the norm. Much of this vision is attainable now. In fact, many people have routers that already feature "guest networking" capabilities. To make this even easier, we are working with a coalition of volunteer engineers to build technologies that would make it simple for Internet subscribers to portion off their wireless networks for guests and the public while maintaining security, protecting privacy, and preserving quality of access. And we're working with advocates to help change the way people and businesses think about Internet service.

Electronic Frontier Foundation 


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Atlantica Undersea Colony - Undersea Colonization and Research

Atlantica Undersea Colony - Undersea Colonization and Research | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
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If You Can't Beat 'Em, Subvert 'Em: Countering Misinformation on the Viral Web

If You Can't Beat 'Em, Subvert 'Em: Countering Misinformation on the Viral Web | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Our information networks no longer even try to optimize for truth. Here's how we worked with the imperfect system.
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Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible

Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

 

In order to build a quantum internet – a network that is faster and more secure than the current internet – the key is the ability to transmit quantum information between remote quantum computers (i.e., nodes). The most familiar approach involves entangling the links between nodes and then using quantum repeaters at intermediate locations to provide entanglement swapping, extending the range of entanglement across km-long networks. In such a system, the performance is inherently limited by the time it takes to establish entanglement between nodes. This time is at best the classical signaling time between the nodes, but with many schemes it is even longer, and increases as network size increases. Since the qubits that store the quantum information are unstable and quickly decohere, quantum memories are required to store quantum information for milliseconds or longer while they wait for entanglement. The result is a theoretical limitation on speed due to the system's design and the need for additional components – quantum memories – to enable a functioning network.

 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-10-quantum-entanglement-faster-previously-thought.html#jCp

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Evolution for free? Self-organization as driver of natural selection

Evolution for free? Self-organization as driver of natural selection | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

 In his book "The Origins of Order", Stuart Kauffman [3] uses the term "order for free". Order for free refers to the seeming lack of thermodynamic cost to the spontaneous generation of order observed in self-organizing systems. Of course, self-organizing processes must conform to thermodynamic constraints, but nevertheless result in highly ordered patterns. Two common examples of self- organization in biology are morphogenesis (a developmental process - [4]) and insect nest building (a behavioral process - [5]).


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Building powered by algae growing on its facade | KurzweilAI

Building powered by algae growing on its facade | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The very first building in the world with a shading system consisting of live micro-algae is being built in the suburb of Wilhemsburg in Hamburg.
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Scientists believe they have come close to solving the 'Matrix' theory - Telegraph

Scientists believe they have come close to solving the 'Matrix' theory - Telegraph | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The question of whether we live in a real world or a simulated one has plagued philosophers for centuries - but now scientists believe they finally have found a way to test the theory.
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Next-generation-sequencing report published | KurzweilAI

Next-generation-sequencing report published | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Credit: Wikimedia Commons) The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) has published the report of the Whole Genome Analysis (WGA) Working Group of the...
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Funded By Atomico, Evrythng Hopes To Create The Internet Of Things, Starts With Drinks Giant Diageo | TechCrunch

Funded By Atomico, Evrythng Hopes To Create The Internet Of Things, Starts With Drinks Giant Diageo | TechCrunch | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things. It's a phrase that holds so much promise but to date has not yet turned our world into one filled with tiny connected sensors feeding a vast matrix of data - just yet.
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Maya demand an end to doomsday myth

Maya demand an end to doomsday myth | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Guatemala's Mayan people accused the government and tour groups on Wednesday of perpetuating the myth that their calendar foresees the imminent end of the world for monetary gain.
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The Selfish Meme-Twitter, dopamine, and the evolutionary advantages of talking about oneself

The Selfish Meme-Twitter, dopamine, and the evolutionary advantages of talking about oneself | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

This spring, a couple of neuroscience researchers at Harvard published a study that finally explained why we like to talk about ourselves so much: sharing our thoughts, it turns out, activates the brain’s reward system. As if to demonstrate the thesis, journalists and bloggers promptly seized the occasion to share their own thoughts about the study, often at a considerable cost to accuracy. “Oversharing on Facebook as Satisfying as Sex?” the Web site for the Today show asked.

Well, not really. The study, which combined a series of behavioral experiments and brain scans, didn’t suggest that anyone, in the lab or elsewhere, had found sharing on Facebook to be an orgasmic experience. What it did suggest was that humans may get a neurochemical reward from sharing information, and a significantly bigger reward from disclosing their own thoughts and feelings than from reporting someone else’s.

 

keep reading..

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