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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Tourist Experience Design and Insights
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Summer Reading List: Picks From the TED Community

Summer Reading List: Picks From the TED Community | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Summer: the season for cracking open a good book under the shade of a tree. TED has compiled about 70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. Warning: not all of these books can be classified as beach reads. And we think that is a good thing.
Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Andrea Rossi
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
I with I can find the time to read at least 40 of these
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Escape Google With These 12 Search Engine Alternatives

Escape Google With These 12 Search Engine Alternatives | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Google isn't the only game in town and isn't even the best alternative for many specific search tasks and needs. Here's how to escape Google's grip with Bing, Blekko, BuzzSumo, DuckDuckGo, SocialMention, Quantcast, Topsy, Wolfram|Alpha, and more.As concerns over the de facto monopoly status of Google continue to grow, I'm reminded of the great philosopher Herman Cain and his infamous line "blame yourself". As long as "Google" is a generic phrase for Internet search, their dominant position is assured. That said, you can do something about it.There are plenty of Google alternatives and many of these players offer a bettersearch experience, depending on your needs. Here are 12 alternatives to escape your reliance on Google for all things search...
Via Jeff Domansky
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
There are plenty of superior alternatives to Google
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The Seven Deadly Sins of Startup Storytelling

The Seven Deadly Sins of Startup Storytelling | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
So you called a cab, but no one’s showing. The only thing the cranky dispatcher will say is “He’ll be there in 15.” You call back in 15, and he now says, “Driver’s on the way. Any minute now.” Click. It’s cold, it's getting dark, and you’re already late.Wouldn’t it be great if there was an app that let you tap into an unused supply of empty cabs and cars to get you where you want to go, perhaps with a little style? So goes the legendary inspiration behind Uber, a story now encapsulated in a single tagline: “Everyone’s private driver.”When it comes to persuasion, companies have traditionally appealed to the left side of the brain — logic, pricing, specs. Emotion, however, has proven to be the better marketing tool. As Daniel Pink, author of Drive, writes, “Right-brain dominance is the new source of competitive advantage.” Appealing to the right side of the brain allows for deeper engagement by uniting an idea with an emotion. The best way to do this: Tell a story.That said, the way you tell a company’s story is (and should be) quite different from the way you’d tell a story at a party. While the same techniques for success apply, too often business stories fall flat or set unnecessary fires, particularly in the domain of start-ups. You see it all the time. But in my experience, you can’t teach a company how to tell its story — just like you can’t teach someone to have a certain personality. Instead, I’ll give you the big don’ts....
Via Jeff Domansky
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
And the storytelling tips just continue
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Technology tools and shiny stuff
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100 Useful Websites You’ve Probably Never Heard of

100 Useful Websites You’ve Probably Never Heard of | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“ The Internet is full of great websites, but it's often tough to separate the duds from the superheroes. We've got you covered, with our list of 100 Useful Websi”
Via Deborah Welsh
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Technology in Business Today
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9 Favorite Content Creation Tools that make life Dramatically Easier

9 Favorite Content Creation Tools that make life Dramatically Easier | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“ Products that are remarkable get talked about.-Seth Godin Yes, that is very true Seth … great products get talked about often.”
Via TechinBiz
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Content Creation, Curation, Management
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10 Common Blog Writing Mistakes (Infographic)

10 Common Blog Writing Mistakes (Infographic) | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“Ever wondered what the most common grammar mistakes are that bloggers make? Run-on sentences, punctuation, or maybe use of wrong tenses? This infographic highlights common blog post writing errors and blogging facts.”
Via Philippe Trebaul, massimo facchinetti
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
This is not only true for BLOGing - perhaps something that should be printed and hung on the wall?
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14 Google Tools You Didn't Know Existed

14 Google Tools You Didn't Know Existed | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
From the Ngram Viewer to Google Dart, check out some of these lesser-known Google applications.
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
Some really usefull tools in this list
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Content Marketing and Curation for Small Business
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TIPS - 12 Lessons About Content from 11 Tech Companies

TIPS - 12 Lessons About Content from 11 Tech Companies | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“There are a lot of companies on the web producing content, but to me, these are the ones doing it the right way.”
Via Peg Corwin
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
These are great lessons about content development an how to " keep it real"
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from healthcare technology
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Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world

Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Today we’re accustomed to going on the Internet to visit websites, send e-mails, shop online, run mobile apps, and even get up to the second and down to the inches directions from satellites orbiting the earth. We’re seeing medical devices and related hardware moving faster towards the same kinds of consumerization, their sensors switching from analog to digital native, becoming more mobile, and perhaps most importantly, becoming part of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) by generating enormous amounts of coveted clinical data.What’s going to be even more spectacular is that you’ll soon be wearing smart watches that can know your vital signs, electronic “bandaids” that can sense whether wounds are healing, and many other personal medical devices that continuously monitor things going on within and around your body. These kinds of devices will make up what will soon become the “Medical Internet of Things” (mIOT). mIOT devices will generate significant amounts of data and managing this data becomes what’s known as a “big data” problem. The reason is obvious – data flowing continuously from your body comes in rapid velocity, large volumes, and many different kinds of variety.As we create and upgrade future devices, our designers must realize that they’re no longer just making standalone devices, they’re likely crafting a system component that fits into a larger system of systems ecosystem that is creating and moving around enormous amounts of coveted data. Coveted because that data can be used to improve diagnostics, tailor clinical workflows, improve patient safety, and advance care coordination. All of these kinds of tasks and the data that will make them possible become even more important as payment models move from FFS to outcomes-driven.Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/keeping-medical-device-designs-relevant-big-data-world-slideshow/#ixzz2tf5cOHMI
Via nrip
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
Speaking the truth
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Infographic: How To Be More Creative

Infographic: How To Be More Creative | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“There are a lot of ways to beat creative block. A particular infograph created by Who Is Hosting This? is a good resource on how to bring back your creative self.”
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11 Must-Measure KPIs for Content Marketing Success

11 Must-Measure KPIs for Content Marketing Success | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Content has value beyond simple search engine optimization. Content marketing, when done correctly, has its own ROI as a channel, and thus must be measured by a set of unique KPIs, including links, engagement, social sharing, and conversions.
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What really makes a good story? | ABC Copywriting

What really makes a good story? | ABC Copywriting | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
"This post draws on academic research into political storytelling, and other sources, to argue that the most effective commercial stories share seven closely related characteristics: drama, familiarity, simplicity, immersion, relatability, agency and trust in the teller."Read the full article to see examples and find out more about these 7 characteristics highlighted in the infographic.
Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose), massimo facchinetti
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Content Creation, Curation, Management
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A Framework for Using Content Curation in a Learning Organization

A Framework for Using Content Curation in a Learning Organization | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“A framework for using Curation in a learning organisation”
Via Robin Good, massimo facchinetti
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Content Creation, Curation, Management
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How to create a prezi that will blow away your audience

How to create a prezi that will blow away your audience | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“The folks at gtcreate know how to make a Prezi look awesome and blow audiences away becau...”
Via Baiba Svenca, Rui Guimarães Lima, massimo facchinetti
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
Good and helpful tips for prezi making
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Content Creation, Curation, Management
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5 Tips for Creating Landing Pages That Convert

5 Tips for Creating Landing Pages That Convert | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
For most of you, creating a landing page that converts is critical for success. Whether you’re doing lead generation, building a subscription list, or closing a sale, the quality of your landing page determines your success.
Via Stefano Principato, massimo facchinetti
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Your User is a Hero: Applying Joseph Campbell’s “Monomyth” to User ...

“ Chances are, you’re already using User Journeys to plan how people will interact with products you design. Writers have been doing this for centuries – creat...”
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
There is some good advice for creating "feels" in your (user)stories
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Inspired By Design
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"I was what they call in America an asshole." Do what you want to do. | Slomo

“Dr. John Kitchin quit a medical career to pursue his passion: skating along the boardwalk of San Diego’s Pacific Beach. He calls himself “Slomo.””
Via Tyler Negus Snidow, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
Feel good movie of the day...
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Social Media and Healthcare
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Can you promote drugs and medical devices through social media?

Can you promote drugs and medical devices through social media? | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
In recent years, guidance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA” or “Agency”) for industry on the use of social media has continued to evolve in incremental steps, but the pharmaceutical and medical device industries continue to await more comprehensive guidance regarding the use of social media for drug, biologic, and medical device product communications. Beginning with the “sponsored link” warning letters to 14 pharmaceutical manufacturers in April 2009 and through the most recent untitled letter involving social media promotion sent to Swiss drug manufacturer Institut Biochimique SA (“IBSA”) in February 2014, much of FDA’s guidance on the use of social media for product communications has come in the form of untitled and warning letters to manufacturers. These letters demonstrate, in particular, that FDA has been independently scrutinizing social media outlets, including Facebook,1 Twitter,2 and YouTube,3 and offer a window into FDA’s nascent social media policies.While it is clear that FDA has held social media promotions to the same standards as traditional prescription drug promotional media (e.g., balance of therapeutic benefits and potential risks, and stating only FDA-approved indications), drug and medical device manufacturers are still uncertain about the boundaries on using social media to promote products and interact in real time with customers and about how to submit such materials to FDA for approval. Though recently issued guidance documents shed some light on the manner in which companies may utilize social media platforms to communicate regarding their products, FDA has not yet provided the more extensive guidance anticipated by industry in advance of the July 2014 deadline for FDA to issue social media guidance established by Section 1121 of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (“FDASIA”). In the absence of comprehensive guidance, an increasing number of manufacturers are forging ahead to promote their products through social media.FDA’s Latest Facebook Enforcement ActionFDA’s Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (“OPDP”) recently sent an untitled letter to IBSA and its U.S. agent, Akrimax Pharmaceuticals, LLC, warning IBSA that its Facebook site for a prescription drug, Tirosint, violates FDA’s promotional labeling requirements.4 The letter stated that IBSA had failed to disclose any risks associated with Tirosint, whose label contains a Boxed Warning and other specific Warnings and Precautions, and did not include material information about the drug’s FDA-approved indications that limit its therapeutic uses. OPDP stated that the Facebook post was misleading because it “suggests that Tirosint is safer than has been demonstrated” and failed to convey the limited extent of the FDA-approved indications.As with some previous enforcement actions involving social media,5 FDA became aware of the violation through its internal monitoring and surveillance program, meaning that FDA continues to monitor manufacturers’ social media sites, as well as traditional static websites, for statements that violate promotional labeling rules. This enforcement action highlights why manufacturers must pay close attention to information about their products posted on social media outlets, and should carefully consider the recently released Draft Guidance (discussed below) on submitting social media promotional materials for FDA review.Draft Social Media GuidanceOn January 13, 2014, FDA released a significant piece of the social media guidance that manufacturers have been seeking. The document, “Draft Guidance: Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human and Animal Drugs and Biologics” (“Draft Guidance”),6 sets out the Agency’s expectations for submitting prescription drug promotional materials to be posted on social media sites. The Draft Guidance states that FDA intends to exercise its enforcement discretion regarding regulatory requirements for postmarketing submissions of interactive promotional media under “certain circumstances.” In its determination of whether a drug or medical device manufacturer is responsible for submitting specimens of interactive promotional media, FDA will consider the following criteria:
  1. A firm is responsible for product promotional communications of sites that are owned, controlled, created, influenced, or operated by, or on behalf of, the firm, including any site to which the firm posts materials, such as Facebook, Twitter, firm blogs, and any other site over which the firm exerts influence, even if the influence is limited in scope.
  2. Under certain circumstances, a firm is responsible for promotion on third-party sites. This includes third-party sites over which the firm has control or influence, including editorial, preview, or review privileges or any sort of collaboration, even if the influence is limited in scope. However, this does not include circumstances in which the firm provides only financial support to the third party.
  3. A firm is responsible for the interactive promotional content generated by an employee or agent who is acting on behalf of the firm to promote the firm’s product. This includes postings on Facebook, Twitter, or a blog, or responses to consumer questions on an electronic forum or discussion board. Notably, however, FDA will not hold manufacturers accountable for third-party user- generated content posted to a site that it controls.The Draft Guidance recommends that manufacturers submit interactive promotional media using the following possible approaches:
    1. At the time of initial display, a firm should submit, in its entirety, each site for which it is responsible on Form FDA 2253 or Form FDA 2301. For example, the firm should submit the comprehensive static product website with the addition of the interactive or real-time components, including annotations to indicate the interactive portions.
    2. For third-party sites on which a firm’s participation is limited to interactive or real- time communications (e.g., a public electronic forum or discussion board), a firm should submit the home page of the third-party site, along with the interactive page within the third-party site and the firm’s first communication, on Form FDA 2253 or Form FDA 2301 at the time of initial display.
    3. Once every month, a firm should submit an updated listing of all non-restricted sites for which it is responsible or in which it remains an active participant and that include interactive or real-time communications, but the firm need not include screenshots of the actual communications.
    4. If a site has restricted access, a firm should submit all user-generated content related to the discussion, as well as screenshots or other visual representations of the site and communications, to provide context to facilitate FDA review.
    5. When submitting the site, FDA recommends that a firm take formatting factors (e.g., appearance, layout, and visual impression) into consideration to enable the Agency to view the communications as a whole.FDA specifies that the Draft Guidance applies only to interactive promotional media rather than traditional static webpages (e.g., a product webpage without interactive elements).Broader ImplicationsWhile the Draft Guidance answers some basic questions about how companies may submit interactive promotional media to FDA, the guidance does not address all aspects of social media use for product communications. FDA is expected to provide additional guidance covering other aspects of social media promotion in the near future.One particularly notable example of the Draft Guidance’s incompleteness is the absence of any mention of the “like” function on Facebook or any similar function on other social media sites allowing one to “endorse” another’s post. FDA warning letters have addressed the use of the “like” function,7 indicating that the Agency considers such use a promotional activity; however, the Draft Guidance does not clarify whether “liking” or “re-tweeting” someone else’s post gives a manufacturer “control or influence” over a third-party site.FDA’s recommended approaches for submitting interactive promotional media clarify that manufacturers need not report all real-time communications in separate submissions. Instead, a manufacturer must initially submit (1) its own entire interactive or social media website, or (2) the home page of a third-party site on which the manufacturer posts along with the first communication on that site. Otherwise, a manufacturer must submit monthly reports listing sites on which the manufacturer is an active participant. This implies that FDA will independently monitor manufacturers’ real- time promotional communications by periodically reviewing the listed sites. We expect that the interactive media submission requirements will continue to evolve as FDA begins regular surveillance of reported websites. Given the greater visibility resulting from required submissions, the industry will likely continue to see FDA enforcement in this area.Compliance ConsiderationsAlthough the Draft Guidance is not yet final, it represents FDA’s current thinking on enforcing manufacturer compliance regarding interactive, real-time promotion of prescription drug products on social media outlets. Manufacturers should review current policies and procedures on product promotion and submitting marketing materials to FDA in light of the Draft Guidance and determine whether to take advantage of the comment period to provide comments and suggestions to FDA before the April 14, 2014, deadline. FDA has stated that it will provide clarification on the Draft Guidance in July 2014.In light of the recommendations offered by FDA in the Draft Guidance, manufacturers should consider the following questions:
      • Does the manufacturer currently have a mechanism for tracking websites on which its employees and agents post messages or statements about its products so that it may submit all representative interactive promotional materials to FDA?
      • Does the manufacturer have the capability to track its employees’ and agents’ product-related posts on social media sites to ensure that it may efficiently locate a post that becomes the subject of an FDA enforcement action?
      • Will the manufacturer’s current policies and procedures for company and employee posting of product-related statements on social media websites and submitting such materials to FDA need to change in order to comply with FDA’s recommended submission methods?
      • Will the manufacturer use website functions to endorse third-party posts, such as the “like” or “re-tweet” functions? How will the manufacturer ensure that these uses conform to the Draft Guidance?
      • Will the manufacturer implement internal monitoring or auditing of social media promotions—e.g., by requiring a review of social media activities and/or postings by a promotional review committee and an annual review by audit and monitoring committees?

Via Plus91
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Changing Behavior Through Persuasive Design - SXSW 2014

“Presented during SXSW 2014 on Saturday, March 8th, 2014, 12:30-1:30pm, Austin Convention Center, Ballroom A. http://schedule.sxsw.com/2014/events/event_IAP2...”
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
Striving for a behavioral change - it is what every didactical designer does!
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Slidedocs: Spread Ideas with Effective Visual Documents

“Download the interactive PowerPoint at slidedocs.com! Nancy Duarte’s fourth book, Slidedocs, introduces a new medium: slidedocs. Slidedocs are visual documen...”
Via Jeff Domansky
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
There are a lot of good ideas and observations within these 171 pages
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from Knowledge Broker
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How To Be Interesting (In 10 Simple Steps)

How To Be Interesting (In 10 Simple Steps) | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
A wonderful compilation of charts from Jessica Hagy’s book: How To Be Interesting (In 10 Simple Steps).
Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
This is just plain an simple info - but it is explained in a nice and visual way. I especially enjoy the " fun not had" graph
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Rescooped by Uffe Duvaa from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
“ The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.” “ Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products. ”Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work. After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.
Via Gust MEES, John Evans
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The 25 Must-Read Content Marketing Presentations of 2013

“ 2013 was the year for content marketing about content marketing! This presentation contains 25 of the top presentations on SlideShare that I bookmarked through”
Via Lydia's Marketing & Communication Consulting, massimo facchinetti
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
This is a great collection!!!
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7 Ways to Run an Unsuccessful Mobile Email Campaign - Business 2 Community

7 Ways to Run an Unsuccessful Mobile Email Campaign - Business 2 Community | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Mobile gadgets are the preferred media for opening email and responding to mobile marketing. That’s true across demographics, but especially among the youth set known as Millennials and Generation Y. As revealed in the infographic below from our client Reachmail, among the general population, 75 percent are using smartphones regularly to manage email. Millennials’ use of iPhones, Android phones and iPads to scour daily mail is as high as 80 percent. Most don’t even re-check mail on desktops and are intolerant of marketers who don’t cater to the small screen revolution. This means a great deal for businesses who don’t wish to lose the business of new clients or customers. Specifically it means that advertising will become a game of who can satisfy the most mobile users. The companies with most the mobile-friendly promotions and resources win.
Via massimo facchinetti
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The 25 Best Slideshare Presentations Of 2013

The 25 Best Slideshare Presentations Of 2013 | Knowledge stocks | Scoop.it
Sellection of the top 25 slideshare presentations of 2013 for business leaders, marketers and growth hackers. Reading through the list and paging through the slides is like taking a training course on some of the biggest trends in business and marketing.
Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Uffe Duvaa's insight:
A lot of great topics covered in these 25
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