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We Are The Filter Bubble

We Are The Filter Bubble | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
Computer algorithms aren't the only thing contributing to the 'Internet Filter Bubble.' Who we choose to connect with in our social networks deeply affects who...
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Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why

Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it

I curated and posted this a few months ago but feel it's relevant and timely today. (What brought this to mind was another important article written by Axel Schultze, which I have commented on below.

 

Here's what I said about Gideon Rosenblatt's post.

 

This is one of those gems that I love to share. It was written by Gideon Rosenblatt in response to an earlier article written by Eli Pariser, "The Filter Bubble", which is about the way algorithms (based on our personal searches) affect the results that are returned to us, as a result, we're not seeing the whole picture.

 

"Computer algorithms aren't the only thing contributing to the 'Internet Filter Bubble."

 

**In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

 

**In that power to choose our connections, rests our ultimate power to reshape our information filter bubbles and radically improve our perception of reality.

 

**Who we choose to connect with in our social networks deeply affects our ability to see a diversity of information.  

 

My takeaway from this is that whereas technology may restrict the results returned to us by search engines, the other, and perhaps more important half of the equation is controlled by us!  It is well documented that we are more likely to influenced by our circle of friends and associates than by anything else that we may find (or that may find us!). 

 

By effectively curating our circles of influence, we increase the value of this ever important means of discovery and therefore of our entire online experience. 

 

**This in turn can make us far more effective and informative consumers as well as curators, when we widen our own circles.

 

Great article by Axel Schultze CEO of xee.me

 

"Why SEO will Be Gone in 5 to 10 Years" as he talks about "Relationships and Recommendations Soon More Valuable Than SEO" (Robin Good)

 

Jan Gordon: "Here's what caught my attention:

 

Axel: As long as people search for a product not knowing their name or a technology, not knowing its source or a solution not knowing who is a potential supplier SEO is an important part of the marketing mix...

 

However, this is slowly and steadily changing.

 

**Today 60 – 80% of the so called educated purchase decision is based on recommendations by trusted individuals or groups that have no or no significant interest in the sale but helpful and experienced people using or knowing the product or service in need.

 

And the number of recommendation based purchases is steadily growing. I'm sure it will hit the 80 – 90% range in the next 5 to 10 years.

 

Now – what does that mean to SEO?

 

Why should a business invest in search engine optimization if most of the purchase decisions are based on recommendations?

 

Wouldn't it be smarter to invest into the "recommendation chain" instead in SEO?

 

Wouldn't it be more effective and successful to make sure people recommend a product than hoping to come up higher in the list of search results?"

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read the full article: http://bit.ly/AxRrEr

 

Via janlgordon

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Image by Istockphoto  from an article by Social Media Examiner

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/AxRrEr]


Via janlgordon, k3hamilton, juandoming
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janlgordon's comment, March 15, 2012 8:05 PM
Gideon.Rosenblatt
You made my day! I always love reading and curating your articles this was definitely no exception. Thank you for always raising the bar and making us pay attention to what's really important.
janlgordon's comment, June 17, 2012 3:53 PM
Thank you for this Robin, it's greatly appreciated. It's exciting to watch and be a part of all this change, I'm sure you agree:-)
Robin Good's comment, June 18, 2012 2:28 AM
Yes Jan... I don't know exactly what you are referring to, but this the only sure thing we have today: this is time of fast and continuous change... so I am certainly enjoying the ride.

On another note: I would humbly suggest to consider posting shorter stories, especially when you are also pointing to the original, as what I am looking for from you, is not a rehash of what's in the article - outside of a 1-3 para excerpt - but the reasons why you are recommending it. You are already doing both, but it is overwhelming for me. Too much stuff, and I haven't even seen the original yet.

I would also gently mute some of the visual noise you create by heavily formatting with asterisks, bolds and big font sizes. In my case that doesn't help much. It actually hinders my ability to rapidly scan and check whether you have something good there.

I suggest to limit greatly the formatting options you use and to highlight only what is really relevant, because when too many things are highlighted, bolded, asterisked, none has any more an effect on me. It's like a crowd screaming: who do you help? :-)
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Best Free Content Curation Tools 2012

Best Free Content Curation Tools 2012 | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
Blog post at iBlogzone - Online Business Resources : Content Curation has been on the upside lately, and while there are some who don’t think that it is an ethical form of “content creation[..]...
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Content Curation No Substitute For Content Creation | Forrester Blogs

Content Curation No Substitute For Content Creation | Forrester Blogs | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
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How to Share Content More Efficiently by Integrating Google Reader and Buffer | Social Media Explorer

If you subscribe to a lot of blogs and invest time in sharing useful content with your audience this workflow will help you streamline your process.
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Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
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Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 1:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 5:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 5:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
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Twitter acquisition confirms that curation is the future

Twitter acquisition confirms that curation is the future | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
Twitter's purchase of Summify, which delivered an email summary of interesting links from a user's social networks, shows Twitter is trying to get smarter about how it filters the flood of information users are exposed to.
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Reduce Information Noise Through Social Curation and Collaborative Discovery: Calm Technology

Reduce Information Noise Through Social Curation and Collaborative Discovery: Calm Technology | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Among the five digital trends presently shaping the consumer experience economy, according to Macala Wright who first wrote about this on Mashable, there is one that has as its key objective the reduction of "information noise", distractions and approaches to digital communication that make it harder to grasp and understand a message or to complete a key task one is after.

 

It reads like there is more to information curation than people scanning feeds and selecting relevant items to write about.

 

From the original article I have extracted a few passages: "Calm technology refers to applications that cut down on the digital noise of high-volume data to show the user only enough information that he or she needs to complete a task.

 

...It refers to technologies that do not disrupt our workflow.

 

The whole idea is to reduce distractions to our work flow without losing functionality.

 

Calm technology fights against many of the principles of digital marketing: instead of screaming for attention with flashing banner ads, technologies and applications politely take a backseat to the user’s primary focus...

 

...

 

Examples of calm technology can be found in the growing popularity of social curation and discovery.

 

Social product discovery sites such as Lyst, Mulu.Me, Buyosphere, Svpply and Discoveredd are essentially social filters that enable their communities to curate the products that are most relevant to them.

 

Moreover, the rise of interest networks and the idea of following someone who has similar likes and shared interest topics are examples of the principles of calm technology driving user behavior.

 

Google Circles, Pinterest and Chime.In, even location apps such as Sonar, Glancee and Highlight, can all be classified under the “term interest network.”

 

Excellent reading. 8/10

 

Full article: http://fashionablymarketing.me/2012/06/digital-trends-consumer-experience-economy/ ;


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7 Acts Of Content Curation | Social Media Max

7 Acts Of Content Curation | Social Media Max | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
Interesting presentation by Pawan Deshpande, founder and CEO of Curata. Pawan Deshpande, founder and CEO of Curata, makes the argument that with the all of the content being created today, ...
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Screen Capture

Capture anything you see on your PC screen with SnapIt. It is convenient tool for graphic designers, bloggers who capture and crop images for their posts, for tech writers who need to describe menus and interfaces of applications, web designers and those who work with graphics every day. It captures and auto saves images with one click.

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FUMSI Article: Is Pinterest of interest to the info pro?

FUMSI Article: Is Pinterest of interest to the info pro? | Knowledge Curator | Scoop.it
Pinterest - the social network that allows you to create a virtual pinboard of things you...
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