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Australasian telehealth celebrates its coming of age

Australasian telehealth celebrates its coming of age | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
Pulse+IT Magazine - Australasia's First and Only eHealth and Health IT Magazine...
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Telecare benefits being 'missed' - UKauthorITy.com

Telecare benefits being 'missed' - UKauthorITy.com | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
UKauthorITy.comTelecare benefits being 'missed'UKauthorITy.com"Telecare and telehealth can play a transformative role in reducing carer stress and give them the peace of mind to take time for themselves, socialise or even enable them to work...
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Learning to love e-health

Learning to love e-health | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
4 essential requirements to wean doctors off paper and make e-health more attractive (Learning to love e-health http://t.co/ChKuJe1T #ehealth #pcehr (repost)...)...
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The Telehealth Daily

The Telehealth Daily | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
A newspaper by Michael Byrnes - updated daily with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos. (The Telehealth Daily is out!
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Telemedicine Improves Health Of Diabetics, Research Says

Telemedicine Improves Health Of Diabetics, Research Says | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it

Diabetics in low-income communities can improve their blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure readings by using telemedicine--mobile devices and Web-based portals--according to a new report from nonprofit eHealth Initiative (eHI). These improvements in turn can lead to reductions in emergency room visits and hospital readmissions.


An Issue Brief on eHealth Tools and Diabetes Care for Socially Disadvantaged Populations says "e-health" tools can assist clinics that have limited resources and personnel, are often the only center of care within a large geographic area, and are not connected to a large health system.


The new research shows that e-health technologies can reduce healthcare costs, said Jennifer Covich Bordenick, chief executive officer of eHI, an independent group that seeks to improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of healthcare through technology. Bordenick noted that, for instance, as more affordable smartphones get into the hands of consumers, they will increasingly use them to access apps to count calories and obtain nutrition information; log fitness workouts; monitor vital signs; calculate disease risks; and monitor adherence to medications. These tasks can have a significant impact on diabetic care.


Via nrip, Paul Epping
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Download Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services report

Download Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services report | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
Released: 4 Oct 2012 Author: AIHW Download a copy of key results report here More info or purchase hard copy This is the third national report on health services provided by Aboriginal community controlled and ...
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NACCHO Aboriginal health media release for Mental Health Week Oct 2012

NACCHO Aboriginal health media release for Mental Health Week Oct 2012 | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
Aboriginal health leader calls on Aboriginal communities, families and government  agencies to talk openly and honestly about so called mental health issues? Mr Justin Mohamed, Chair of NACCHO repr...
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Teleheath: Would you trust this machine to act as your GP?

Teleheath: Would you trust this machine to act as your GP? | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it
Known as telehealth, this is how the Government hopes health will be managed at home: not in the future, but from now.

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Mobile health apps don't always follow conventional wisdom

Mobile health apps don't always follow conventional wisdom | Kimberley Telehealth | Scoop.it

Propaganda and non-truths abound all around the Internet saying that mobile health apps are everything from a threat to Big Pharma to a way to save billions of dollars in healthcare costs. There may be a future for mobile apps but a lot of work is yet to be done.

 

Last year I led some market research into mobile apps across all demographic segments and several disease conditions. While we did uncover some opportunities for mobile health we also learned that patients are very finicky about what they want in health apps and even more finicky about being reminded of their health conditions.

 

We found, for example, that type 1 diabetics are open to mobile apps that help them better manage their diabetes. This was especially true for caregivers of type 1 diabetics but when it came to apps to help type 2 diabetics manage their health there was a lot of pushback such as “I don’t want to be reminded that I have diabetes” and “I don’t want to have to consult my phone to choose what to eat from the menu.”

 

In younger demographics we found that people were more likely to download health apps that helped them make healthier choices in their lifestyles. However the key for these people, since they are tech savvy, is to ensure that the health apps are up to date and provide real value as they define value.

Now what about apps that remind patients to stay compliant with medications? Wrong answer. The last thing patients wanted was their smartphones buzzing with a reminder to take their medication because they found it intrusive and they also had privacy issues with it.

 

In my opinion, the future of mobile health is not via smartphone but in devices that patients can use at home to monitor everything from blood pressure to their heart. Patients would use these devices at home and then the devices would wirelessly send the data to either their PC for collection or to their doctor. Physicians would then be able to communicate with patients about the results via email or in person.

 

Does this mean that there isn’t a market for mobile health apps? No, not at all. What it means is that if pharma wants to get serious about mobile health they are going to have to integrate the level of expertise needed to ensure these apps are user friendly and have utility for their target audience not to mention the back end analytics to measure the impact and keep the apps up to date.


Via nrip, ISEEU Global
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