Kidnappings - Italy - 1970s
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10 Fascinating Kidnappings - Listverse

10 Fascinating Kidnappings - Listverse | Kidnappings - Italy - 1970s | Scoop.it
Kidnapping is one of the most fascinating modern crimes, due to the psychological effects on the captive, the captors, and the captive’s family. For example, the captors who care for the victim at times become quite protective of their captive.
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Read number 10 - John Paul Getty III

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Italy Sets Hard Line on Kidnappers and on Ransom - New York Times

Long plagued by well-organized gangs of kidnappers, Italy took its first steps this week toward a new hard-line policy against both the abductors and the families who are willing to negotiate with
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Italian extradited over 1970s kidnap and murder of duke

Italian extradited over 1970s kidnap and murder of duke | Kidnappings - Italy - 1970s | Scoop.it
· Sussex engineer, 66, loses 12-year legal battle · Friends and colleagues vow to fight on his behalf
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Kidnapping of Aldo Moro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro (Italian: Rapimento Moro) was a seminal event in Italian political history.

On the morning of 16 March 1978, the day on which the new cabinet led by Giulio Andreotti would not undergo the confidence vote at the Italian Parliament, the car of Aldo Moro, former prime minister and then president of Christian Democracy (Italian: Democrazia Cristiana, or DC, Italy's relative majority party at the time), was assaulted by a group of Red Brigades (Italian: Brigate Rosse, or BR) terrorists in Via Fani in Rome. Firing automatic weapons, the terrorists killed Moro's bodyguards (two Carabinieri in the car which presumably housed the politician and three policemen in the following car) and kidnapped him.

On 9 May 1978 Moro's corpse was found in the trunk of a Renault 4 in Via Caetani after 55 days of imprisonment, during which Moro was submitted to a political process and the Italian government was asked for an exchange of prisoners. Despite the common interpretation, the car location in Via Caetani was not halfway between the locations of the national offices of DC and of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) in Rome.[1]

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Reviewing the experience of Italy in the 1970s - Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Toni Negri was one of the historic leadership of the Italian revolutionary group Potere Operaio (Workers' Power) and is currently serving a prison sentence in Rebibbia prison, Rome.
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In Italy, Kidnapping A Centuries-old Specialty

In Italy, Kidnapping A Centuries-old Specialty | Kidnappings - Italy - 1970s | Scoop.it
The lonely ordeal of Alessandra Sgarella, 39, began one afternoon eight months ago when she was abducted near the entrance of her apartment building in an exclusive neighborhood of Milan.Her...
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Red Brigades - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Red Brigades (Italian: Brigate Rosse, often abbreviated BR) is a Marxist-Leninist vanguard paramilitary organization, based in Italy, which was responsible for numerous violent incidents, assassinations, and robberies during the so-called "Years of Lead". Formed in 1970, the organization sought to create a "revolutionary" state through armed struggle, and to remove Italy from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The Red Brigades attained notoriety in the 1970s and early 1980s with their violent attempts to destabilise Italy by acts of sabotage, bank robberies, and kidnappings.[1]

Models for the Red Brigades included the Latin American urban guerrilla movements. Volumes on the Tupamaros published by Feltrinelli were influential", a sort of do-it-yourself manual for the early Red Brigades" and also the Italian partisan movement of 1943–45 which was interpreted as an example of a youthful minority using violent means for just ends.[2]

The group's most infamous act took place in 1978, when the second groups of the BR, headed by Mario Moretti, kidnapped the former Christian Democrat Prime Minister Aldo Moro, who was trying to reach a compromesso storico, or "historic compromise", with the Communists.[1] The kidnappers killed five members of Moro's entourage, and murdered Moro himself 54 days later. The BR barely survived the end years of the Cold War following a split in 1984 and the arrest or flight of the majority of its members. In the 1980s, the group was broken up by Italian investigators, with the aid of several leaders under arrest who turned pentito and assisted the authorities in capturing the other members. After the mass arrests in the late 1980s, the group slowly faded into insignificance.[1] A majority of those leaders took advantage of a law that gave credits for renouncing the doctrine (dissociato status) and contributing to efforts by police and judiciary to prosecute its members ("collaboratore di giustizia", also known as pentito).

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