Kaveh's Organization Design
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4 Ways to Discover Your Strengths

4 Ways to Discover Your Strengths | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it
You may have talents you didn't even know about. Here are some creative ways to unlock your potential.Get the latest blog articles on business ideas and...

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Rescooped by Kaveh Sedigh from Higher Education Business Strategy
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Innovation Excellence | The Truth about Radical Innovation

Innovation Excellence | The Truth about Radical Innovation | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it
The problem is that radical innovation is rarely a prudent course. It not only disrupts competitors, but also your value network: customers, suppliers, partners and even employees.

Via Alison Pendergast
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Rescooped by Kaveh Sedigh from Business & Innovation
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Why Starbucks Succeeds In China

Why Starbucks Succeeds In China | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it

Any go-to-market strategy involves a well-defined plan comprising of a market study on all aspects of the target customer with details on demographics, preferences, location, etc. This is followed by the brand positioning and pricing of the products.


In addition to this, Starbucks focused on two main areas where the other foreign companies failed - Localization of the products & employee welfare


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Lessons for your business? Refugee camps not designed for refugees | World | DW.DE | 09.10.2012

Lessons for your business? Refugee camps not designed for refugees | World | DW.DE | 09.10.2012 | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it
Refugee camps have to work fast to supply people with their basic needs. As a result they are set up according to a standard plan - which leads to problems for the daily life of the people living there.

 

There are at least 4 lessons for the commercial world in this story

 

1.  You will always things your organization structure is correct or "good enough' until you are confronted with the experience of your customers.  If the design of your organization does not begin with the user experience then chances are your structure is based more on your convienience than user needs.  In the end you will lose sales.

 

2.  There is no "standard" plan anymore.  What worked with Katrina will not work for Fukashima.  What works for your next big customer may not be what worked for your last big customer.  If you are still trying to become "agile" and your organization design has changed little in the last 10 years... well, then you may not be ready for "inventive". 

 

3.   Change fast or people die.  Ok this may seem dramatic.  However, over the past few years I have witnessed a number of people - who have families - experience a dramatic economic crisis in their lives.  Not all could have been avoided.  However, somewhere along the way there was that one business or one leader who could have and should have looked ahead and seen the coming disaster.  Unfortunately, they waited until the last minute when it was too late to shift resources from recreation into re-creation.

 

4.  You must survive in order to rebuild.  Have you ever met a survivor?  They are wonderful inspirations.  Man is a wonderful creation.  No matter how much we get wrong, we can learn, become stronger, and adapt.  As long as we survive the crisis.  How quickly you adapt.  How deliberately you inact change... those will help you to be the winners in the end.  Look at your organization now, 2013 will be a better year for many, if you are working on your structure, processes, and people performance right now you will be on of the surviving winners.  If not...

 

 

www.pyramidodi.com

 

 

 


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Rescooped by Kaveh Sedigh from Small Business Development Advice
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7 Steps To A Brilliant B2B Marketing Plan

7 Steps To A Brilliant B2B Marketing Plan | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it
Don't get left behind, follow these 7 Steps to Brilliant B2B Marketing! Many Business-to-business (B2B) companies are already successfully getting great r. Marketing topic(s):Digital strategy development.

Often B2B organisations are not getting the most from today’s marketing since they don’t have a planned approach based on an integrated inbound marketing plan.

Smart Insights created an Infographic showing the latest research on how companies are using inbound marketing and digital marketing with advice on key issues to think through at each step which are relevant to all involved in inbound and content marketing.

The results across different studies show that while many companies are delivering brilliant results,  many could do more.

 

By Dave Chaffey. http://bit.ly/LBVse2

Source. http://bit.ly/QVmv5q


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Vitor Martins's curator insight, November 25, 2013 1:59 PM

51% of businesses don´t have a strategy, do you?

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What's Wrong with This Picture: Kodak's 30-year Slide into Bankruptcy

What's Wrong with This Picture: Kodak's 30-year Slide into Bankruptcy | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it

When new technologies change the world, some companies are caught off-guard. Others see change coming and are able to adapt in time. And then there are companies like Kodak -- which saw the future and simply couldn't figure out what to do. Kodak's Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing on January 19 culminates a long series of missteps, including a fear of introducing new technologies that would disrupt its highly profitable film business.


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Know your customers and what they want

Know your customers and what they want | Kaveh's Organization Design | Scoop.it

It still amazes me to find businesses that fall apart simply because they simply don;t know their customers.


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