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South Africa's official gateway - investment, travel, country information

South Africa's official gateway - investment, travel, country information | Karoo Boy-South Africa | Scoop.it
The all-in-one official
gateway to South Africa. Comprehensive country information for
investors, tourists, citizens and South Africans abroad
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The largest database of everything South Africa. This website will answer any questions you may have.

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Visit South Africa

Join Ticket to Ride in South Africa on one of their Gap Year programmes, surf camps, or surf travel courses.
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Now that the violence in South Africa has dissipated, it is a beautiful place to visit. It has everything from safaris to surf experiences. The recently build hotels are extravagant, though pricey.

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Apartheid Did Not Die

This is "Apartheid Did Not Die" by John Pilger on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.
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Though the apartheid laws are officially massacred, the apartheid ideals still remain in South Africa today. The black working class gained the right to vote in a democratic system. They gained the right to buy and sell land. They did not, however, gain the right to choose their occupation. Native Africans are still used as basically slaves. Payed next to nothing and, though technically illegal under the new government, are being forced to work. Threats come through of murdered and kidnapping. This documentary brings up and interesting idea that Nelson Mandela ,and all that he did for the Native Africans of his home country, was staged. This is explained as it being a safety net to keep the small white population safe from the massive amount of Africans living in the country. From this perspective, that means that Nelson Mandela was payed off by public officials. This would make sense due to Mandela's life sentence to prison. These points are brought up and argued by the two directors/ narrators. This documentary is an in depth look at why racism and segregation is not even close to being dispersed in South Africa.

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Apartheid Government

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Since 1910, South African government has held in place a body of segregation policies. This carried on for 30 years before the National Party won an election by a slim margin and began to implement an apartheid state of law. The term apartheid refers to the institutions and laws implemented by the Nationalist Party to keep the native African population segregated and repressed at any cost. The reason for this was the fact that the immigrated Europeans felt the need to hold all of the power of a nation, though the population ratio was near four to one (Native South Africans to European settlers). This policy was held so tightly by  the South African government that violent acts were the norm on day to day life. One act that was particularly vicious occurred on March 21, 1960, when the police force opened fire on a group of protesting Native Africans. The police ended up killing 69 protesters and quelled protest for a short time and the government banned the National African Council (ANC) and the Pan African Conference. This brought these parties to use methods of violence to fight their oppression. Nelson Mandela, a up and coming force in the ANC, was arrested and sentenced to a life of imprisonment. After a short time, it was clear that apartheid policies could not stay in tact as the majority of the countries population was the labor force and they were being oppressed. The 1970's is when the governments policies began to unravel. This is credited to the immense amount of Africans that migrated to South Africa, which between 1940 and 1980 was 29 million. Pieter Willam Botha (State President from 1983-1989) tried one last attempt to reinvigorate the apartheid policies by allowing Africans to buy their own land. This was essentially the beginning of the end for apartheid based government. Within three years of this, Africans were given full rights and citizenship. After Botha's term, De Klerk was inaugurated in 1990. De Klerk was the nail in the coffin of the apartheid government. He lifted the bans on the ANC and released leaders such as Mandela. Over the next several years of his leadership, most of the major apartheid laws were lifted.

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South Africa Government Online Homepage

South Africa Government Online Homepage | Karoo Boy-South Africa | Scoop.it
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South Africa's government runs in an interesting fashion since the riddance of the apartheid policies.

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Going to War

Going to War | Karoo Boy-South Africa | Scoop.it
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This shows the oppressed working class, all black, about to violently protest the apartheid government.

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South African History Online

South African History Online | Karoo Boy-South Africa | Scoop.it
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South African History Online (SAHO) is a historical database of South African History. The website is periodically updated with biographies that explain the lives and importance of some of the most significant figures of South Africa. Another feature of the website is the art section. This shows the brighter side of the South African culture and highlights the artistic ability of the inhabitant of the nation. The timeline is a feature that takes all of South Africa's rich history and places it on to a linear way to view it. This is the most dynamic and interesting part of the site as you can explore everything from the life of a important figure or the rise and fall of an entire government. This timeline also is the home of several other, smaller facts that, if one were to investigate, would find how rich and deep the culture of South Africa has always been. The part of this website that I focused mainly on was the social politics section. This gave a very in depth look into every part of social life since the early 1400's. This section also gave a very thorough explanation of the apartheid South African government's rise and fall. 

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The Game of Cricket

The Game of Cricket

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The game of Cricket is one that has spanned since the beginning of the 16th century. The rules of the game vary by those who play the game. Despite this there is still an accepted set of rules that dictate the games play. Though the game is fundamentally similar to baseball, the differences between the two are vast. The main difference lies in the scoring. To score a point in cricket the ball must first be put into play by the bowler (pitcher). The bowler bowls the ball trying to knock a bail off of the wickets behind the striker (batter). The wickets are three vertical stakes of wood with horizontal planks set in the grooves on the top of the wickets (bails). If the ball knocks a bail off of a wicket, the striker is out. If the striker hits the ball on the bowl then and the non-striker ,standing next to the bowler, and the striker must run to the wickets opposite of them to score. They may run back and forth until the bowler receives the ball from someone in the field. If the striker happens to hit the ball so far that the ball goes out of play, the striker is awarded six points. If the striker gets in the way of a bowl that could have potentially hit a wicket, it is up to the referee to decide the outcome of the play. The referee can call the striker out or simply call it as a ball and leave the ball out of play. The striker can get out many other ways including timing out, this is if the striker does not finish his at-bat 2 minutes after the last wicket fell. Another way for the striker to get out is if he hits the ball and the player behind him catches it, the man that catches it can hit the wicket with the hand he has the ball in. This can only occur, however, if the striker steps out of the batting box due to his belief that he hit a ball further than could be caught by the man behind the striker box. Cricket seems to be a very complex sport and one that I am unfamiliar with. Learning all of this was refreshing.

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Xhosa Tribe

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Since before 
     the Dutch colonization of the 1650's, the Xhosa tribe has lived near the    Zulu as both a pastoral and foraging tribe. After almost two centuries of   uninterrupted living in their traditional ways, the european colonization  began and all of the African tribes were split. This, however, did not affect the Xhosa tribes traditions and ceremonies. Throughout the Xhosa history, they have used rites of passage to determine the age group and status of the members of the tribe. One of these sacred and ancient rites is the male initiation. The men line up naked as the ingcibi, or doctor, of the tribe sharpens his knife. The ingcibi then circumcises the men one by one. They then are wrapped entirely for a day in leaves. As the men are removed from the leaves they are plastered with white clay that will remain on their skin for 3 months. These three months they also spend in isolation with no contact to anyone but the other abakweta, or initiates. After these three months of confinement, the abakweta run back to their village, remove all clothing (which for this period of time is just a loincloth), and wash off the clay in the river. This displays to everyone in the tribe that they are no longer boys or abakweta, but men. Another of these rituals is the less brutal rite of female initiation. The intonje, 
or female initiate, is isolated in her own tent for a week. During this week the intonje must observe food restrictions and be a part of animal sacrifices and dances. After this ritual she removes her veil and is in plain view of everyone. She is then considered a woman. These traditions are at the basis of the Xhosa culture.

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