Major Misconceptions about College Education | Kaoru | Scoop.it
This may appear heavily biased, but many people now are predisposed to the position that the only difference between a high school diploma and a college degree is a million dollar’s worth of lifetime savings. It is quite a radical deviation from the traditional paradigm parents use to indoctrinate their children about the value of college education and the role it plays in one’s quest for success. Many people are simply too adamant to admit that there are misconceptions about college and these are handed down from one generation to another. Misconception 1: College is one’s passport to success. The highlighted distinction in the foregoing paragraph is far from being preposterous. Interestingly, such cynicism about the value of a college degree is not a mindset borne out of developments in the new millennium. As early as the 1970s, a handful of great minds presaged the bleak scenario contradicting the vaunted power of knowledge gained from college for a successful career. The recurring themes in the works of Ivar Berg (1970), Caroline Bird (1975), and Richard Freeman (1976) exposed the fallacious argument that college degree is a gilt-edged investment en route to future success. Berg wittily played with words when he lambasted college education as the “great training robbery”. Bird bared her misgivings about the necessity of attending college and the quality of education provided to college students/graduates.Freeman appended a qualifying clause to the old adage that knowledge is power, arguing that the gasconaded power of knowledge applies only when the competition does not possess knowledge. With the strong emphasis given to the tertiary education system, every graduate is practically on equal footing in terms of academic qualification. While it is true that a college degree can help one land a job, there are far more important influences to a successful career or business than the highly over-rated college diploma. The strong link between a college degree and future success is a misconception. Misconception 2: One is not well-educated without college education. If the foregoing contention is erroneous, how would you explain the phenomenal success of Richard Branson, Sean Connery, Bill Gates, Henry Ford, Steve Jobs, Abraham Lincoln, John D. Rockefeller, Will Smith, Mark Zuckerberg, and a host of others? The legendary success achieved by these gentlemen came about without the benefit of college education. Some of them dropped out, the others did not complete high school or had no formal schooling. In one way or another, fate had a hand in bringing these people away from college. Their lives, however, uncovered another misconception - that those who do have college education are not well-educated. The nine guys above are living testimonies that “students” from the “university of experience” can give college graduates a run for their money. This is because in the university of experience, “students” undergo continuous development, have a lot of “hands-on” training, and learn perpetually. Some individuals do well by squeezing themselves into the mold designed for them by people who care for them, the people they…