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Paul Stamets on 6 ways mushrooms can save the world

Mycologist Paul Stamets lists 6 ways the mycelium fungus can help save the universe: cleaning polluted soil, making insecticides, treating smallpox and even flu ... Read more.
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▶ Chaos, Complexity, and Public Policy

Irene Sanders Executive Director and Founder of the Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy and author of "Strategic Thinking and the New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, and Change."

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXxs-JtvkkQ


Via Complexity Digest
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:09 PM

A way cool panel discussion.  I wish I could be a full practitioner of this new, empirically based governing and political strategic thinking.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:34 AM

Loving these new video resources for understanding complexity and it applications.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 23, 2014 9:16 PM

are our politicians aware of these concepts?

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'Content Industry' set to privatize net infrastructure: putting digital rights management in html-5

'Content Industry' set to privatize net infrastructure: putting digital rights management in html-5 | things i found | Scoop.it

It seems that the internet as we knew it is about to pass away, giving way to a much more controlled environment where websites can code what can and what can’t be done with so-called ‘content’, which becomes something akin to a controlled substance.

 

David Bollier, in his recent article

The Piecemeal Privatization of Web Infrastructure

 

relates how the governing entity for the web, the World Wide Web Consortium or W3C, is working on standards that will incorporate Digital Rights Management (DRM) right into the guts of the internet’s language. HTML-5, the next version of the language that displays websites and other things on the net, will be armed … with DRM.

 


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, October 23, 2013 12:58 PM

Digital rights management means you don't have control over what you download from the net ... even if you bought it. Your computer can tell you that you're not authorized to see this or to run this program, and the internet itself is adapted to become the watchdog.

Upstart Collaboratory's curator insight, October 24, 2013 11:43 AM
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Digital rights management means you don't have control over what you download from the net ... even if you bought it. Your computer can tell you that you're not authorized to see this or to run this program, and the internet itself is adapted to become the watchdog.

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Google introduces new ‘Hummingbird’ search algorithm

Google introduces new ‘Hummingbird’ search algorithm | things i found | Scoop.it
Hummingbird better equipped to cope with longer, more complex queries (RT @giustini: #canmedlibs Google's new search algorithm is called Hummingbird http://t.co/klyjLXBFMA)...
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Mushroom Hunting With the Pros

Mushroom Hunting With the Pros | things i found | Scoop.it

Langdon Cook:  "In early August I got a call from a producer for the PBS TV series Food Forward. He had seen a review copy of my new book, The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America, and wanted to film itinerant mushroom harvesters for an episode on wild foods. I knew just the guy to talk to.

 

Doug is one of the characters in my book. He's been hunting mushrooms commercially in the Pacific Northwest for 30 years. Before that he was a logger and he also captained a crab boat. Sometimes Doug cuts steel to make a little extra cash or digs razor clams. He's been roaming up and down the West Coast for decades doing outdoor jobs to pay the bills, mostly picking mushrooms. In recent years I've been roaming with him, meeting the pickers and buyers who work in a hidden economy known as the mushroom trail. Many of the pickers are refugees -- from the Old Economy at home or war-torn countries abroad. They move with the seasons, preferring the fluctuations of a crop tended by nature (and the Gold Rush hope of hitting the mother lode) to the more stable yet monotonous alternative of agricultural work."

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Social Implications of Local Fabrication

Social Implications of Local Fabrication | things i found | Scoop.it
Reposted from the CubeSpawn site
As the title implies, there is more to local fabrication than meets the eye.


How would things change (meaning society in gen…
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(EN) - Beer Brewing Glossary | Brew-Monkey.Com

(EN) - Beer Brewing Glossary | Brew-Monkey.Com | things i found | Scoop.it

"To keep you in the know about brewing and beer terminology..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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andrewo'harecogc's curator insight, September 14, 2015 5:31 AM

Brewing Process Diagram

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Why Aren't There More People Of Color In Craft Brewing?

Why Aren't There More People Of Color In Craft Brewing? | things i found | Scoop.it
Few African-Americans make beer for a living. Latinos and Asian-Americans are also scarce among the nation's more than 2,600 breweries. How did American craft brewing end up so lacking in diversity?

Via Dave'sWildSide
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Mario Mycology | Shirtoid

Mario Mycology | Shirtoid | things i found | Scoop.it
Mario Mycology. “Mario Mycology” by Dianne Delahunty and Nicole Frisk. Mushroom identification chart. Buy at Threadless. Share this: Pin It ... Poketryoshka – Water Type · Double Trouble » · Mario Mycology.
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Hacker Scouts

Hacker Scouts | things i found | Scoop.it

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Jeannine Huffman's curator insight, July 29, 2013 9:59 AM

"Earn a badge for completing an arduino electronic components sheild."

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A Sesame Street for Makers? | MIT Technology Review

A Sesame Street for Makers? | MIT Technology Review | things i found | Scoop.it
Adafruit’s educational series is a brilliant, necessary corrective to our “magic box” tech culture.
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MYO - Wearable Gesture Control from Thalmic Labs

Preorder at www.getmyo.com. Supports Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android.
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Everything you need to know about the piracy-battling Copyright Alert System

Everything you need to know about the piracy-battling Copyright Alert System | things i found | Scoop.it

 

The internet providers and copyright holders have begun using peer-to-peer (P2P) surveillance methods to try to sniff out when copyrighted content is uploaded or shared illegally.

 

A company called MarkMonitor has been contracted to join BitTorrent networks (the most common way to illegally share files) and search for the names of copyright-protected movies, music, and TV shows. The list of those names is provided by the MPAA, RIAA, and NCTA.

 

When MarkMonitor finds a file in violation, they snag the IP address of the user who's sharing the file and send it off to that user's internet provider, who issues a series of escalating warnings.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, March 9, 2013 2:41 PM

Hollywood has found a way to criminalize sharing. But will all those efforts to catch the criminals who don't intend to be Hollywood's clients end up hastening the movie industry's demise?

 

Perhaps entertainment will be different tomorrow and there will be a more direct line - artist-to-fan and vice versa - that leaves no room for Hollywood.

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The War on Reason

The War on Reason | things i found | Scoop.it
Scientists and philosophers argue that human beings are little more than puppets of their biochemistry. Here's why they're wrong.

Via Wildcat2030
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Mark Waser's curator insight, April 2, 2014 12:09 PM

Paul Bloom is always worth reading . . .

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Antibiotic ‘Smart Bomb’ Can Target Specific Strains of Bacteria

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Antibiotic ‘Smart Bomb’ Can Target Specific Strains of Bacteria | things i found | Scoop.it

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a de facto antibiotic “smart bomb” that can identify specific strains of bacteria and sever their DNA, eliminating the infection. The technique offers a potential approach to treat infections by multi-drug resistant bacteria.

“Conventional antibiotic treatments kill both ‘good’ and ‘bad’ bacteria, leading to unintended consequences, such as opportunistic infections,” says Dr. Chase Beisel, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper describing the work. “What we’ve shown in this new work is that it is possible to selectively remove specific strains of bacteria without affecting populations of good bacteria.”

The new approach works by taking advantage of a part of an immune system present in many bacteria called the CRISPR-Cas system. The CRISPR-Cas system protects bacteria from invaders such as viruses by creating small strands of RNA called CRISPR RNAs, which match DNA sequences specific to a given invader. When those CRISPR RNAs find a match, they unleash Cas proteins that cut the DNA.

The NC State researchers have demonstrated that designing CRISPR RNAs to target DNA sequences in the bacteria themselves causes bacterial suicide, as a bacterium’s CRISPR-Cas system attacks its own DNA.


Via Wildcat2030
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New Phytologist: The Phytophthora parasitica RXLR effector Penetration-Specific Effector 1 favours Arabidopsis thaliana infection by interfering with auxin physiology (2013)

New Phytologist: The Phytophthora parasitica RXLR effector Penetration-Specific Effector 1 favours Arabidopsis thaliana infection by interfering with auxin physiology (2013) | things i found | Scoop.it

Pathogenic oomycetes have evolved RXLR effectors to thwart plant defense mechanisms and invade host tissues. We analysed the function of one of these effectors (Penetration-Specific Effector 1 (PSE1)) whose transcript is transiently accumulated during penetration of host roots by the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica.Expression of PSE1 protein in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was used to assess the role of this effector in plant physiology and in interactions with pathogens. A pharmacological approach and marker lines were used to charcterize the A. thaliana phenotypes.Expression of PSE1 in A. thaliana led to developmental perturbations associated with low concentrations of auxin at the root apex. This modification of auxin content was associated with an altered distribution of the PIN4 and PIN7 auxin efflux carriers. The PSE1 protein facilitated plant infection: it suppressed plant cell death activated by Pseudomonas syringae avirulence gene AvrPto andPhytophthora cryptogea elicitin cryptogein in tobacco and exacerbated disease symptoms upon inoculation of transgenic A. thalianaplantlets with P. parasitica in an auxin-dependant manner.We propose that P. parasitica secretes the PSE1 protein during the penetration process to favour the infection by locally modulating the auxin content. These results support the hypothesis that effectors from plant pathogens may act on a limited set of targets, including hormones.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Dartmouth researchers discover how and where imagination occurs in human brains

Dartmouth researchers discover how and where imagination occurs in human brains | things i found | Scoop.it
Philosophers and scientists have long puzzled over where human imagination comes from. In other words, what makes humans able to create art, invent tools, think scientifically and perform other incredibly diverse behaviors?

Via Wildcat2030
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CubeSpawn Needs Votes to Get Funded!

CubeSpawn Needs Votes to Get Funded! | things i found | Scoop.it
For those that have followed the developments in CubeSpawn: I'll give a brief introduction to the current request for support,
 
For folks new to the concept: …
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Ice Brewing Gyokuro

Ice Brewing Gyokuro | things i found | Scoop.it
Have you heard of ice brewing? It's done with ice instead of water. In this post I'll be showing you how to ice brew gyokuro.

Via Frank Kusters
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Tasting Shackleton’s Polar Whisky

Tasting Shackleton’s Polar Whisky | things i found | Scoop.it
The replication of a historic whisky might reflect merely our fascination with artificial artifacts---but the whisky yielded a surprise...

[excerpt]

During the 1908 Nimod expedition, the ill-equipped British adventurer Earnest Shackleton attempted to be the first to reach the South Pole. Having failed to do so less than 100 miles short of his destination, he abandoned the continent–and the entire contents of his supply huts. In 2007, mycology experts recommended cleaning out the ice under one of the huts on Ross Island to help stave off an invasion of hungry Antarctic fungi. In the process, conservators discovered three crates of Mackinlay’s Rare Old Highland Malt Whisky, apparently left by Shackleton or a member of his crew.

[...]


Via Northern_Clips
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Mesh Potato - Fast, cheap mesh networks

Mesh Potato - Fast, cheap mesh networks | things i found | Scoop.it

The Mesh Potato is a device for providing low-cost telephony and Internet in areas where alternative access either doesn't exist or is too expensive. It is a marriage of a low-cost wireless access point (AP) capable of running a mesh networking protocol with an Analog Telephony Adapter (ATA).


Via The Asymptotic Leap
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Will.i.am Thinks Being a Maker is the new Aspiration

Will.i.am Thinks Being a Maker is the new Aspiration | things i found | Scoop.it
The musician and technophile has a very important thing to say about makers.Read more on MAKE

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Moore's Law and the Origin of Life

Moore's Law and the Origin of Life | things i found | Scoop.it
As life has evolved, its complexity has increased exponentially, just like Moore’s law. Now geneticists have extrapolated this trend backwards and found that by this measure, life is older than the Earth itself.

Via Spaceweaver
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Generation Y struggling to start their adult lives

Generation Y struggling to start their adult lives | things i found | Scoop.it
Congratulations, Generation Y. After several years of study sessions and midterms, you survived relatively unscathed. You’re a post-secondary graduate, the proud owner of a brand-new bachelor’s degree.

Via Digitives
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The Internet Deserves Its Own Holiday | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

The Internet Deserves Its Own Holiday | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | things i found | Scoop.it
Every so often in human history, something new comes along that warrants a celebration, and that deserves its own holiday. That’s why I propose we celebrate “Internet Freedom Day” later this month.

Via Wildcat2030
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Wildcat2030's curator insight, January 2, 2013 7:50 AM

We need to celebrate. Because before the internet, we were in a different sort of dark age: We had to wait to hear news on TV at night or in print the next day. We had to go to record stores to find new music. Cocktail party debates couldn’t be settled on the spot. We had to wait years for encyclopedia entries to be updated. And even wizards like Hermione Granger could only find what they needed in a library full of dusty parchment books.

The internet swept through our lives and changed all of these things, and more. We hear about earthquakes before they even reach us. We can fix broken encyclopedia entries … ourselves. We can find reported news and sentiment instantly (even those of software millionaires on the run). We can share, comment, remix, create, even make – all with just a few clicks.