K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode
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K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode
A collection of organizations and projects for connecting classrooms outside their local community. Projects connecting classrooms to community will also be considered. Send recommendations.
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Connected Learning Lab (CLL) | Research

Connected Learning Lab (CLL) | Research | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
The Connected Learning Lab (CLL) is dedicated to studying and mobilizing learning technologies in equitable, innovative, and learner-centered ways. Located at the University of California, Irvine, the CLL supports interdisciplinary research and design, and partnerships with a broad network of educational practitioners and technologists. The CLL’s focus is defined by the “connected” in connected learning, which refers to both social relationships and emerging digital and networked technologies. Connected learning is when someone is pursuing a personal interest with the support of peers, mentors and caring adults, and in ways that open up opportunities for them. It differs from technology and institution centered approaches to educational technology in being people-first, prioritizing student interests, cultural relevance, and the life of communities. Connected learning is also a uniquely interdisciplinary and cross-sector approach that brings together the learning sciences, social sciences, design, informatics, and computing to develop new research frameworks, engage in pressing real world problems, and develop and test breakthrough innovations. The research is clear that young people learn best when actively engaged, creating, and solving problems they care about, supported by peers who appreciate and recognize their accomplishments. Today’s digital world offers an unprecedented opportunity to make these forms of engaged, relevant, and interest-driven learning accessible to young people in all walks of life. The CLL investigates both formal and informal learning settings, and supports connection and alliance building across varied institutions and sectors. The Connected Learning Alliance, a project of the CLL, is dedicated to building a cross-sector network of organizations dedicated to the spread of connected learning. The CLL grows out of over a decade of MacArthur Foundation investment in the Digital Media and Learning Hub at UC Irvine, and the research of the Connected Learning Research Network and the Youth and Participatory Politics Research Network.to edit the content
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Register now for the BRIDGE Program in Spring 2018! - BRIDGE - An iEARN Program

Register now for the BRIDGE Program in Spring 2018! - BRIDGE - An iEARN Program | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Are you a middle school or high school teacher interested in bringing global projects into your classroom?  Do you want to connect your students with classrooms in the Middle East and North Africa?  You can start this Fall by joining iEARN’s BRIDGE Program.

The Spring 2018 program activities will run February-May 2018. As a BRIDGE educator, you will receive a one-year iEARN membership, access to our network of global educators and 100+ projects, professional development opportunities, and continued support for incorporating global collaborative projects into your classroom.

If you are interested in joining the BRIDGE Program this Spring, please fill out this Application Form. Spring registration deadline has been extended to January 15th. 
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iEARN in Action: September 2017

iEARN in Action: September 2017 | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Join us for the 2017-2018 iEARN project cycle! This edition of the newsflash includes new and ongoing projects to join and register for in the next month.
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Navigating the Digital Shift II: Implementing Digital Instructional Materials for Learning

Navigating the Digital Shift II: Implementing Digital Instructional Materials for Learning | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it

Navigating the Digital Shift II:
Implementing Digital Instructional Materials for Learning



Overview

SETDA expands upon the 2015 Navigating the Digital Shift report with a focus on living and learning in the digital age. In this second publication, stakeholders will learn about states’ guidance and policies around the implementation of digital instructional materials, as well as best practices. Specifically, this report:

Identifies the essential conditions for teaching and learning in a digital environment
Highlights the on-going shifts in policies
Provides an update on acquisition policies and practices
Reports on funding options
Suggests tips for the selection and curation of digital instructional materials
Offers guidance on accessibility policies and practices 

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Want to have your project included in the 2017-2018 iEARN Project Book? - iEARN Collaboration Centre

Want to have your project included in the 2017-2018 iEARN Project Book? - iEARN Collaboration Centre | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Are you facilitating an iEARN project? Do you have an idea for a new iEARN project? The 2017-2018 iEARN Project Book will be published in September 2018 and we would love to include all new and active iEARN projects in the collection!

Continuing iEARN Projects

If you are facilitating a currently active iEARN project, please submit an updated project plan using the iEARN Project Template form. This project template can be submitted in any language. Please note that ALL projects, including those currently listed in iEARN, must submit an updated project template in order to be considered renewed and included in the book.

New iEARN Projects

We encourage all participants to first look closely at existing projects to see if there is a way that your idea can fit with an already active project. If you see a connection with an existing project, contact the facilitators of that project about possible collaboration.

If yours is a new idea, and you are proposing a new iEARN project, please first post your project idea in the Teachers Forum to find interested partners. If you find partners who are interested in collaborating with you and your students, please fill out the iEARN Project Template form.

Not sure if you're ready to facilitate a new iEARN Project? Check out the project facilitation guidelines to see if you are ready for the role. You can also view the project template and checklist here. You must be a current iEARN member to submit a project - please click here to join if you are not a current member.  

Submission Guidelines

The submission deadline for the 2017-2018 iEARN Project Book is Friday, August 11th, 2017. The book will then be published in early September, and the Project Space of the iEARN Collaboration Centre will also be updated with current project information as you submit your new project templates. We will be in touch with you after submitting to review your project proposal.
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All media content | DW.COM

All media content | DW.COM | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
German and European news, analysis, opinion and breaking news from Germany's international broadcaster
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NAEP - 2015 Science Assessment

NAEP - 2015 Science Assessment | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
The average NAEP science scores for the nation increased 4 points between 2009 and 2015 in both grades 4 and 8, but did not change significantly at grade 12. Scores for most student groups at grades 4 and 8 were higher in 2015 compared to 2009, but were not significantly different at grade 12. At grades 4 and 8, Black and Hispanic students made greater gains than White students, causing the achievement gap to narrow in comparison to 2009. Explore national score gaps.

Compared to 2009, scores were higher at grades 4 and 8 in all three science content areas (physical science, life science, and Earth and space sciences) in 2015, while there were no significant changes in content area scores at grade 12.

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@digitalPromise Global Story Map

@digitalPromise Global Story Map | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it


How are learners connecting with the world?



Explore stories from educators, schools, and programs that support globally connected learning.

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Amy Poehler's Smart Girls

Amy Poehler's Smart Girls | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Amy Poehler's Smart Girls is an online community for young girls and the young at heart, which encourages women in volunteerism, activism, cultural
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Home

Home | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Mission: World Savvy educates and engages youth to learn, work, and thrive as responsible global citizens in the 21st century.

Vision: As the leading provider of global competence education, World Savvy envisions a K-12 education system that prepares all students with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for success and active engagement in the global community.
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Training Future ‘Lady Bosses’

Training Future ‘Lady Bosses’ | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it

As this city grows its fledgling tech and business sectors, some residents want to make sure women hold leadership roles from the beginning. In the United States, women are severely underrepresented in both areas. An analysis last year found that just 15 percent of U.S.-based startups that received funding between 2009 and 2014 have a female founder. Only around 13 percent of Twitter’s tech employees are women, a percentage in line with those at other companies, such as Facebook and LinkedIn. While Silicon Valley struggles to address the disparity, a group of women in Reno wants to prevent it from growing in their city by inspiring girls to start businesses and pursue leadership roles.

On a recent Saturday morning, about 45 girls and young women, ages 7 to 23, filed into a local art venue to attend Girl Empire. They were there to learn how to pitch ideas to investors and take the lead in solving community problems—two crucial skills for entrepreneurs, but not necessarily ones taught in school.


For Lauren Klein, the CEO of Girlmade and the organizer of the event, helping women start businesses is personal. Her teenaged daughter expressed an interest in being an entrepreneur, but Klein had to supplement her daughter’s school work with lessons on how to start and run a business. Klein, who devised growth and marketing strategies for Silicon Valley companies, realized not all parents have the time or ability to do what she did. “This market is ripe for this,” she says. “Eventually, we could be the Girls Who Code of entrepreneurship,” she adds, referring to the nonprofit that focuses on getting more girls into tech.  

After initial introductions, participants divide into teams led by local business owners, all of them women, to brainstorm solutions to problems they see in their community. Later, they pitch them and receive feedback. In the beginning, there are wide stares and mumbled ideas. The lack of directions and the freedom to make choices seem foreign to some. “You can make the rules,” Klein encourages them. “You can be a lady boss.”

Several of the teams decide they want to tackle women’s inequality, a nebulous phrase they eventually realize they need to define as they brainstorm solutions.  “Maybe it can start with women getting paid more,” offers 11-year-old Leilani Carlos. “I don’t get why we’re not, because we’re more qualified,” says Mandisa Bailey, 13, correctly noting that more women than men earn bachelor’s degrees.

"Eventually, we could be the Girls Who Code of entrepreneurship."
One team agrees it’s unfair that a member isn’t allowed to play lacrosse with boys after eighth grade and builds a case for inclusion. Another ...

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"Eventually, we could be the "Girls Who Code" of entrepreneurship."

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Digital Promise Global

Digital Promise Global | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it

Opportunities to improve the quality of and access to education throughout the world are abundant and spreading, thanks to global expansion of broadband, increasing ubiquity of mobile devices, and the power of technology. No longer do the best learning opportunities need to remain exclusive to certain people. Today, access to professional tools, quality interactions with peers and experts regardless of geography, and robust digital content on myriad topics are just some of what is available to the connected learner.

Digital Promise Global aims to spur innovation in order to improve the opportunity to learn around the world, through technology, research, and collaborative partnerships with global educators, researchers, and entrepreneurs. We connect with changemakers and widely share their stories to affect a clearer common understanding of the vision they want to achieve, and catalyze efforts towards expansion.

Our Focus

As our world continues to grow more complex and interconnected, one critical aspect of improving learning opportunity is enabling the development of the skills to collaborate and communicate across borders, and to critically and creatively solve problems as engaged citizens. We envision a world where all students are “globally connected learners,” using technology and digital media in powerful and authentic ways to address challenges with peers around the world.

Our History

Authorized by Congress in 2008 and launched by President Obama in 2011, Digital Promise was created to capitalize on innovations and “harness…digital technologies to improve all levels of learning and education…to provide Americans with the knowledge and skills needed to compete in the global economy.” Digital Promise Global was incorporated alongside Digital Promise to expand the work to include education innovation around the globe. Through our work with educators, entrepreneurs and developers, researchers, and leading thinkers, Digital Promise and Digital Promise Global design and implement initiatives that support people and unleash the power of technology and research to improve learning opportunity.

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If you learned here

If you learned here | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Collaboration. Authentic learning. Authorship. Global friendship. Are you ready for year 2 of If You Learned Here?   2015-16 project registration is open NOW! Visit our Calendar for other...

 

 

If You Learned Here is a global collaboration and authoring project for students in Pre-K through 8th grade. Inspired by the book If You Lived Here: Houses of the World, this project will engage students in a global dialogue about their learning communities. Each school will generate pages for an eBook that we will write and publish together. We hope this global book will provide information and inspiration for readers around the world! 
This project has three phases: 
1) Explore & Share - Using FlipGrid and Padlet, each school participates in 4 weeks of video and image sharing around 4 focus questions. 
2) Write & Publish - Each school uses Book Creator to make 2 pages for our global eBook.
3) Reflect & Celebrate! - Together, we share our learning and celebrate our experience as authors, learners, and friends.

We'll also have a "Week 0" just for teachers. This will be a time to get to know one another, try out our collaboration tools, and answer questions.

The time commitment is approximately one hour per week throughout the months of March and April, 2015. Our blog will walk you through the entire process step by step! You'll need a general comfort level with technology, but you certainly don't need to be a tech expert to participate happily. All levels are welcome.
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The Future is Bright: Young Women’s Leadership in Pakistan

The Future is Bright: Young Women’s Leadership in Pakistan | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it

Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm EST


and recorde


About the Presenter 

Saba Ismail co-founded Aware Girls when she was 15 years old. She supports the idea of strengthening girls’ voices for bringing prosperity in her community. She firmly believes that change has to come through the younger generation. She completed her Masters in Biotechnology from COMSATS University AbbotAbad, completed a Hurford Youth Fellowship with the National Endowment for Democracy in 2013, and has had the honor of speaking at George Mason University in Washington, DC and the University of Maryland. She is an alumna of the International Visitors Leadership Program USA. Her bravery and activism was acknowledged by Foreign Policy Magazine by awarding her as one among 100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2013. She is also on the Steering Committee of UNOY and represents Asia in the World Youth Movement for Democracy. Saba has done research on the “Role of Young women in Emerging Democracies.” She is the co-founder of South Asian Regional Feminists Forum on Women’s Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. She has worked as Youth Ambassador for Asia Pacific Youth Network (APYN: 20120-2013). She joined Aware Girls as Executive Director in September, 2011.

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Free Higher Ed Update for 2018: 5 of the Best Free College Course Resources | Emerging Education Technologies

Free Higher Ed Update for 2018: 5 of the Best Free College Course Resources | Emerging Education Technologies | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
One of the best things to come out of the web when it comes to education is the offering of free courses, and even free degrees (if your grades earn them), available to anyone, anywhere, from leading universities. Below we have 5 of the best online sources for these types of offerings, compiled by guest writer Ray Bennet.

Via Jim Lerman
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Global Collaboration Day

Global Collaboration Day | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Join Global Educators & Organizations on September 21st!
Students, teachers, and organizations will celebrate global collaboration on September 21, 2017!  On this day (and beyond), experienced global educators and professionals will host connective projects and events and invite public participation. The primary goals of this whole day event are to demonstrate the power of global connectivity in classrooms, schools, institutions of informal learning and universities around the world, and to introduce others to the tools, resources and projects that are available to educators today. 

We believe in the power of connected learners.....let's show others what globally connected learning looks like on September 21st!
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TEN WAYS TO FIGHT HATE: A community resource guide - Southern Poverty Law Center 

TEN WAYS TO FIGHT HATE 

Hate in America has become commonplace. A presidential candidate wins election after denigrating Muslims, Latinos, women and people with disabilities. A young white man opens fire and kills nine African Americans who welcomed him into Bible study at a church in Charleston, South Carolina, telling his victims, “I have to do it.” A Muslim woman is seated on a bench in front of a coffee shop in Washington, D.C., when a woman begins screaming anti-Muslim epithets. A swastika and other anti-Semitic graffiti appear at an elementary school in Stapleton, Colorado. A lone gunman carrying an assault rifle and a handgun storms a well-known gay club in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and wounding 53 others. What can we do to STOP THE HATE? 

Bias is a human condition, and American history is rife with prejudice against groups and individuals because of their race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or other characteristics. As a nation, we’ve made a lot of progress, but stereotyping and unequal treatment persist. 

When bias motivates an unlawful act, it is considered a hate crime. Most hate crimes are inspired by race and religion, but hate today wears many faces. Bias incidents (eruptions of hate where no crime is committed) also tear communities apart and can escalate into actual crimes. 

Since 2010, law enforcement agencies have reported an average of about 6,000 hate crime incidents per year to the FBI. But government studies show that the real number is far higher — an estimated 260,000 per year. Many hate crimes never get reported, in large part because the victims are reluctant to go to the police. In addition, many law enforcement agencies are not fully trained to recognize or investigate hate crimes, and many simply do not collect or report hate crime data to the FBI. 

THE GOOD NEWS IS … 
All over the country people are fighting hate, standing up to promote tolerance and inclusion. More often than not, when hate flares up, good people rise up against it — often in greater numbers and with stronger voices. This guide sets out 10 principles for fighting hate in your community
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ReportGirlsEqualRightEducation.pdf

Realisation of the equal enjoyment of the right to education by every girl

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
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Power of Digital Age Learning Shared with Malaysian Ministry of Education Coaches Responsible to Train 11,000 School Principals

Power of Digital Age Learning Shared with Malaysian Ministry of Education Coaches Responsible to Train 11,000 School Principals | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Today, the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE®) and the Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC) announced the completion of an educator professional development program that prepares Malaysian educational leaders to share the power of digital age learning with more than 30,000 students around the Southeast Asian country. Eighty-five Malaysian educators have completed the ISTE Coaching Certificate Program that uses blended instruction to train coaches who will prepare school principals to transform instruction through the integration of digital age skills and computational thinking.
“Through our collaboration with MDEC, Malaysian educators are empowered to bring authentic digital age learning to students across their country,” said Cheryl Scott Williams, ISTE interim CEO. “It’s exciting to work with global partners, such as MDEC, who share our vision for transforming learning through the effective use of technology.”
Through the certificate program, participants worked with administrators at local schools, representing a reach of approximately 90 schools, 3,500 teachers and 40,000 Malaysian students.
The certificate program used blended instruction, comprised of on-site trainings by a team of ISTE faculty in the Malaysian regions of Enstek, Kedah and Sarawak, as well as two online courses. The participants were introduced to the ISTE Standards and Essential Conditions for learning, teaching and leading in the digital age. The curriculum explored digital age learning topics such as student-centered learning, computational thinking, and exploring and connecting tools to content.
In an interview for entrsekt, ISTE’s member magazine, MDEC CEO Yasmin Mahmood said, “ISTE provides a platform for Malaysian educators to be part of a global network of 100,000 educators and education leaders worldwide to exchange and learn from new ideas and experiences.”
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Liter Of Light

Liter Of Light | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
About Liter of Light 

Liter of Light is a global, grassroots movement committed to providing affordable, sustainable solar light to people with limited or no access to electricity. Through a network of partnerships around the world, Liter of Light volunteers teach marginalized communities how to use recycled plastic bottles and locally sourced materials to illuminate their homes, businesses and streets. Liter of Light has installed more than 350,000 bottle lights in more than 15 countries and taught green skills to empower grassroots entrepreneurs at every stop. Liter of Light’s open source technology has been recognized by the UN and adopted for use in some UNHCR camps. Liter of Light is the proud recipient of the 2015 Zayed Future Energy Prize and a winner of the 2014-2015 World Habitat Award.
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Bosh Bosh

Bosh Bosh | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Bosh Bosh is an ethical fashion brand and NGO in Liberia, West Africa, that unites people from all over the world that believe poverty can be alleviated by empowering women and girls through education and economic development.
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The Urgent Call to Replace Fear With Curiosity

The Urgent Call to Replace Fear With Curiosity
By Maya Soetoro-Ng & Alison Milofsky

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In an earlier installment of the blockbuster "Star Wars" film series, the Jedi master Yoda delivers another of his classic rhetorical gems that connect to the real-life strife darkening so much of our planet today. "Fear is the path to the dark side," Yoda reasons. "Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering."
It's a simple observation that captures a common and destructive phenomenon: the individual's fear of the unknown "other." In the name of cultural or physical survival, it can be manipulated to fuel tensions that can spiral into cycles of violence. Taken to extremes, the results are evident—from sectarian divisions in Iraq and Syria, to religious divides in Nigeria or Myanmar. Tensions still threaten in Bosnia-Herzegovina more than 20 years after the end of that crushing war. Fear also contributes heat to the political debates about terrorism and refugees in the U.S. presidential campaign.

—Jon Krause for Education Week
While political leaders struggle to quell the fires of today's global violence, communities in the United States and elsewhere could take steps to avert another generation of destruction. They must nurture the world's young people toward a more peaceful future. More than half the global population is under the age of 30, and more than two-thirds of them are concentrated in Africa and the Middle East—two regions rocked by violent conflict.
The essential role of young people in preventing and resolving violent conflict received powerful validation recently: The U.N. Security Council adopted Resolution 2250, on youth, peace, and security, with the unanimous support of the United Nations' 193 member states. The resolution calls for involving young people in decisions at the local, national, regional, and international levels, even in peace processes and dispute resolutions.
Local leaders, schools, and families can contribute to this goal. There must be a more concerted effort to help youths develop the habits of mind and the practical skills necessary to engage with people different from themselves and to approach conflict in ways that lead to constructive change. The result could help address the fears that often contribute to cycles of violence.
Schools already are taking basic steps on a small scale, including incorporating lessons into a range of curricula and introducing peer mediation in high school. International Baccalaureate K-12 programs encourage a global mindset rooted in empathy and compassion for the "other." But more support is needed and on a greater scale, with a diversity of approaches. Schools are in a crucial position to help inculcate a more complex and nuanced sense of identity; an understanding of multiple perspectives; and the skills to engage in open dialogue, rather than just debate.
A strong sense of identity contributes to self-esteem and self-worth, which, in turn, help people comprehend and accept other opinions and visions. Research, such as a 2011 study published in the journal Psychological Science, has long established that individuals who have low self-esteem are more likely to show bias toward people who are different from them.
By helping children practice from an early age how to critically examine their own needs and identities and understand those of others, we could better ensure that, as adults, they have the ability to engage in disputes without turning to violence. Students could, for example, create oral histories to explore facets of their identity. They could write letters, diaries, poetry, and speeches from the perspective of peers thousands of miles away in order to practice relating to the lives of others.
"Schools are in a crucial position to help inculcate a more complex and nuanced sense of identity."
Lessons in culture and history should be global and multicultural. The tendency and desire to identify with just one language or just one culture endangers community harmony. Instead, we need to encourage global competence—communicating problems and perspectives across borders, even when we acknowledge that some ideas are better than others.
Root causes of conflict can be moderated with discussion that engenders curiosity about other perspectives, builds empathy, and makes complexity a friend rather than a foe. As some schools are already demonstrating, opportunities abound for incorporating these kinds of lessons into the standard curriculum.
In one New York City history class, one of us—Maya Soetoro-Ng—conducted a yearlong exercise in empathy. Students analyzed the standard curriculum readings—including books and articles—identifying underrepresented voices. Using index cards, students would then write a poem, letter, journal entry, or pulpit speech from the perspective of that individual or group. Taped to the wall, the cards formed a paper bridge which, by the end of the school year, was full of different points of view and histories, connecting past to present, and the world of the classroom to the world outside. Exercises like this give learners a chance to develop a more profound potential for empathy.
Another example is a paper-folding activity we use with young people and adults the world over that was adapted from an exercise by Jules N. Pretty in Participatory Learning and Action: A Trainer's Guide. All participants receive a blank piece of paper and are asked to close their eyes and follow verbal instructions for folding and tearing the sheet. Inevitably, the results vary greatly: Some papers have holes in the middle, some have none. Some papers have corners ripped, and some are ripped into four pieces.
The exercise illustrates how the same message can be interpreted in multiple ways, in the same way that people involved in a conflict can see a disagreement differently.
One approach to considering multiple perspectives is the process of dialogue—a method of increasing understanding through open-ended questions and careful listening. The purpose is not to "win," but to engage in an alternative form of communication. In conflict situations, people tend to become entrenched in their positions, sticking firmly to assumptions and narrow beliefs, trying to persuade others that they are correct.
Through dialogue, people come to recognize that not all situations have one right answer, and they seek to know others' perspectives rather than try to dismantle their arguments.
Already, young people the world over are taking the initiative to pursue constructive action that bridges divides and counters hate. In Afghanistan, youths successfully used street art, theater, and a host of other techniques to encourage peaceful elections in 2014.
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In Uganda, two young men formed an organization called the Uganda Muslim Youth Development Forum to prevent the recruitment of marginalized youths into militant groups like Al-Shabab and the self-styled Islamic State. The group trains young people in leadership and conflict management and conducts a course for imams on communications skills to counter extremist messages more effectively.
In the United States, a group of friends established a website called I Am Your Protector to promote stories of people who defend each other from vitriol or outright physical violence across typical barriers such as race, class, gender, or belief.
But young people need help acquiring the skills necessary to fulfill their potential as agents of constructive change. There is an urgent call to create learning opportunities for the next generation. If we do not answer it, we may be destined to live in a world terminally divided by what we assume people to be, rather than what they really are.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Root causes of conflict can be moderated with discussion that engenders curiosity about other perspectives, builds empathy, and makes complexity a friend rather than a foe. As some schools are already demonstrating, opportunities abound for incorporating these kinds of lessons into the standard curriculum.
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Erin Gruwell on Planting the Seeds of Peace in Israeli Classrooms

Erin Gruwell on Planting the Seeds of Peace in Israeli Classrooms | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Erin Gruwell, author of The Freedom Writers Diary (Broadway Books, October 1999) reflects on her recent trip to Israel I recently returned from the Middle East, and I feel compelled to share. My trip to Israel and the West Bank was inspiring and eye-opening. I did over 20 events in Israel on behalf of the…
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Writers Speak to Kids

Writers Speak to Kids | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
This video series brings the insights and advice of award-winning authors into the classroom.

In this NBC Learn special collection, children‘s book authors share their writing experiences to help students learn more about the craft and techniques of creative writing.

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Fostering Leadership in Women and Girls

Fostering Leadership in Women and Girls | K-12: Connecting outside your zipcode | Scoop.it
Fostering Leadership in Women and GirlsWednesday, Dec. 2 at 3 p.m. Eastern Time
REGISTER HERE

Join us for a presentation by Deb deVries and Kathy Hurley, co-founders of Girls Thinking Global, a nonprofit dedicated to the empowerment and education of adolescent girls and young women worldwide. Deb and Kathy will lead an engaging conversation on some of the latest research on the strengths of women and leaders, and real life experiences of women who have achieved significant leadership roles in education and business based on interviews conducted with women leaders from Kathy Hurley's book, Real Women, Real Leaders.

What are the qualities that make women good leaders? How can we begin to nurture these qualities in girls from a young age? How can we help girls all around the world to get an education and reach their potential? We invite teachers, administrators, education industry executives, parents, and students to join us for this kick-off presentation for the Girls Thinking Global community.

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