Juvenile Brain theory
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Juvenile Brain theory
Adolescent Developing Brain Theory and Sentencing. This topic could fill up a book or two. This post — which is not going to be substantive – is intended only to remind people of this issue, stuff most of you probably already know.
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Iowa prison inmates sue state over release dates - Chicago Tribune

Iowa prison inmates sue state over release dates - Chicago Tribune | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it
KCRGIowa prison inmates sue state over release datesChicago TribuneAP Some Iowa prison inmates have filed a class-action lawsuit against the state, saying they were held past their release dates.
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THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN -- WHY TEENAGERS THINK AND ACT DIFFERENTLY-- - Advocates for Abandoned Adolescents

THE ADOLESCENT BRAIN -- WHY TEENAGERS THINK AND ACT DIFFERENTLY-- - Advocates for Abandoned Adolescents | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it
It now appears some of that baffling behavior of your teenage child (or student) may be the result of neurobiology not raging hormones For many years it was…...
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Disputation about inflammation in the immature brain, the role of Toll ...

Disputation about inflammation in the immature brain, the role of Toll ... | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it
Disputation about inflammation in the immature brain, the role of Toll-like receptors. November 13, 2011. Last Fiday there was a disputation about the inflamamtion in the immature brain, the role of Toll-like receptors focused.
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Study: Teenage brain lacks empathy - Advocates for Abandoned Adolescents

Study: Teenage brain lacks empathy - Advocates for Abandoned Adolescents | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it
If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it's probably because they're just incapable of doing so.
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Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Does the Adolescent Brain Make Risk Taking Inevitable? A Skeptical Appraisal

Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Does the Adolescent Brain Make Risk Taking Inevitable? A Skeptical Appraisal | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it

Increasingly influential theories hold that the “teenage brain” suffers cognitive flaws that impel risk taking. Aside from warnings by leading researchers that brain science is insufficiently advanced to yield definitive findings that teenage behaviors are internally driven, the belief that adolescents take excessive risks has been developed using biased measures and without first ruling out alternative external explanations. In fact, the best demographic, crime, and health statistics show that adolescents do not take excessive risks compared to adults, adolescent risks are associated much more significantly with conditions of poverty and corresponding adult behaviors than with uniquely adolescent factors, and middle-aged adults exposed to the same high poverty levels as American youth display similar or higher levels of crime, violent death, firearms mortality, traffic fatalities, and other behaviors conventionally associates with adolescents. “Teenage brain” theories and the views of youth and policies they entail require much more rigorous scrutiny than they have received to date.

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Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Juvenile Brain Development, M11 and Rodriguez/Buck

Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Juvenile Brain Development, M11 and Rodriguez/Buck | Juvenile Brain theory | Scoop.it

Adolescent Developing Brain Theory and Sentencing
People v. Chappell, 2011 WL 105652 (Cal. App. 2 Dist. 2011)
The use of neurological evidence to justify lesser sentencing for juvenile offenders was popularized by the dropping of a footnote to the APA amicus brief on the adolescent developing brain theory in Roper v. Simmons (2005). In this case, a fourteen-year-old defendant was found guilty of first-degree murder under the theory of felony-murder with special circumstance and was sentenced to 50 years to life. On appeal, defendant claims (among other things) that his sentence constitutes cruel and unusual punishment because of his age. Defendant cited several Supreme Court opinions (including Roper) to the effect that juveniles should be treated differently than adults in sentencing, arguing that “developments in psychology and brain science continue to show fundamental differences between juvenile and adult minds.” The court of appeals recognizes that “the sentence is very severe for a crime committed by one so young.” It nevertheless affirmed the judgment because the defendant’s age was taken into account already when he was given a sentence less than life without possibility of parole.

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