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Content Shock: Why content marketing is not a sustainable strategy - {grow}

Content Shock: Why content marketing is not a sustainable strategy - {grow} | justtesting123 from Company Name | Scoop.it
Is the end of the content marketing era in sight?

 

Advanced/ Excerpt...

 

The volume of free content is exploding at a ridiculous rate. Depending on what study you read, the amount of available web-based content (the supply) is doubling every 9 to 24 months. Unimaginable, really.

 

However, our ability to consume that content (the demand) is finite. There are only so many hours in a day and even if we consume content while we eat, work and drive, there is a theoretical and inviolable limit to consumption, which we are now approaching.

 

This intersection of finite content consumption and rising content availability will create a tremor I call The Content Shock. In a situation where content supply is exponentially exploding while content demand is flat, we would predict that individuals, companies, and brands would have to “pay” consumers more and more just to get them to see the same amount of content.


Via CYDigital
testcompany123456's insight:

What's the answer?

 

Throughout history, whenever there was an overabundance, a middleman would emerge to discern what was worthy for the audience, and what was crapola. This middleman was paid by his/her ability to find that which would be desired (and profitable), and that which could not compare (thus not profitable).

 

If content is truly bringing about shock, then it makes sense to separate the good from the crapola, and deliver the good to the audience. Isn't that the role of curation?

more...
CYDigital's curator insight, January 7, 2014 7:15 PM

What's the answer?


Throughout history, whenever there was an overabundance, a middleman would emerge to discern what was worthy for the audience, and what was crapola. This middleman was paid by his/her ability to find that which would be desired (and profitable), and that which could not compare (thus not profitable).


If content is truly bringing about shock, then it makes sense to separate the good from the crapola, and deliver the good to the audience. Isn't that the role of curation?

Rescooped by testcompany123456 from The MarTech Digest
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How To Double Your Content Marketing ROI In 2014 - Forbes

How To Double Your Content Marketing ROI In 2014 - Forbes | justtesting123 from Company Name | Scoop.it
December brings many traditions: enjoying the holidays, wrapping up projects from the year that’s ending, and gearing up for the year ahead.

 

Intermediate/ Digest...

 

Setting up your editorial calendar isn’t difficult. A basic Excel sheet or Microsoft Word Table will do the trick. At a minimum, it should contain the following information:

DateWriter or content producer responsible for drafting the pieceWorking titleYour target keywordsContent format (e.g. blog post, white paper, etc.)Call to actionStatus

 

More fleshed out content calendars can include any or all of the following:

For individual pieces, they might include approval chains, alternate titles, and target publicationsOverall campaign goals, mapped to each individual pieceDetails on your audience profiles, mapped to each individual piece. Who are you speaking to with this article? What aspect of their experience do you want to dial up, specifically?What publications are you targeting with your overall campaign, what’s their demographics and contact details?What are your key performance indicators overall for the campaign? How is each individual piece performing against those metrics?What are the biggest successes of the campaign?What roadblocks or issues have you run into as part of the content campaign you’re managing?

 

Your editorial calendar can become much more than just a list of dates and targets. It can serve as a centralized workbook where you manage your entire content flow. It can also serve as a strategic hub that makes it easy to evaluate your progress at any specific moment in time.

 

 


Via CYDigital
testcompany123456's insight:

What's interesting about this article is that it harkens back to the basic outline, where you start with the components then slowly build each section out until you have an article. Same process.

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CYDigital's curator insight, December 30, 2013 8:53 PM

What's interesting about this article is that it harkens back to the basic outline, where you start with the components then slowly build each section out until you have an article. Same process.