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Changing the face of healthcare documentation one patient at a time
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Keys To Medical Transcription: What You Need To Know - EMRs

Keys To Medical Transcription: What You Need To Know - EMRs | Just My Type Transcription | Scoop.it
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Medical leaders in an ideas economy

Medical leaders in an ideas economy | Just My Type Transcription | Scoop.it

Bryan Vartabedian, MD (@Doctor_v) writes:

 

In medicine we’re trapped in a system that values laundry lists over ideas. But we need to think about what we value.

 

In the knowledge economy, ideas are the new commodity. Steven Johnson tells us that the most innovative ideas throughout history have resulted from networks of creative people collaborating and challenging one another to explore the adjacent possible. It’s how we begin to solve problems. Peter Diamandis has it right in his book, Abundance: ”In a rapidly changing technological culture and an ever-growing information-based economy, creative ideas are the ultimate resource.”

 

While we are likely to remain preoccupied with lengthy lists, the medical leader of tomorrow will trade globally in the currency of ideas.

 

[AS: Who is accruing intellectual capital on behalf of healthcare, and were are they going to spend it?]

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Health Premiums Rise A Relatively Modest 4 Percent, Study Finds - Kaiser Health News

Health Premiums Rise A Relatively Modest 4 Percent, Study Finds - Kaiser Health News | Just My Type Transcription | Scoop.it

Via Phil C. Solomon
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The Trials and Tribulations of Going Paperless - OutpatientSurgery.net

The Trials and Tribulations of Going Paperless - OutpatientSurgery.net | Just My Type Transcription | Scoop.it
OutpatientSurgery.netThe Trials and Tribulations of Going PaperlessOutpatientSurgery.netMy EMR project has me feeling a bit deflated, I'll admit. Deflated, but not defeated.
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Physicians, humility, and the transformation of healthcare

Physicians, humility, and the transformation of healthcare | Just My Type Transcription | Scoop.it

A great post from Kent Bottles, MD (@KentBottles) from last month that I missed:

 

Three physicians got me thinking about humility.

 

At the health care innovations summit in Washington, DC earlier this year, I heard Atul Gawande, MD call for medical schools to do a better job at training physicians in humility, discipline, and teamwork (http://careandcost.com/2012/02/03/notes-on-the-care-innovation-summit/). In a 2010 Stanford School of Medicine Commencement speech, Dr. Gawande stated:

 

“And when you are a doctor or a medical scientist this is the work you want to do. It is work with a different set of values from the ones that medicine traditionally has had: values of teamwork instead of individual autonomy, ambition for the right process rather than the right technology, and perhaps above all, humility – for we need humility to recognize that, under conditions of complexity, no technology will be infallible. No individual will be, either.”

(http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2010/06/gawande-stanford-speech.html)

 

Eric Van De Graaff, MD wrote a blog titled “Why Are So Many Doctors Complete Jerks?” Dr. Van De Graaff was chagrined when his own mother was disappointed when he became a physician; she “had a deep-seated disdain for doctors.” Dr. Van De Graaff answered his own question with two theories. His first theory was that some physicians “let the glory of their careers go to their heads and begin to treat patients and underlings like chewing gum on a movie theater floor.” His second theory was that physicians act like jerks when emergencies occur and they feel overwhelmed and frightened.

 

Dr. Van De Graaff offers two simple rules, which he admits he sometimes does not follow:

 

“Rule #1: It is simply not allowable to be impolite, mean, nasty, or snippy with staff or patients even when you are in a stressful situation.

 

Rule #2: Whatever is stressing you is probably stressing those around you as much or more. Under those circumstances you have to go out of your way to be kinder and more understanding. As a doctor, you control the mood in the clinic and operating room even if you can’t control the situation.” (http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/08/doctors-complete-jerks.html)

 

A physician left the following comment on the above Van De Graaff blog post:

 

“Frustrations and stress mount, yes. I think in medicine we should be aware that continuing bad behavior is partially the responsibility of us all. We have social standards and maybe should ask ourselves how much have we allowed these actions to continue? None of us function in a vacuum. We all have the ability to affect change and reward positive communication.”

 

How do we as a community of physicians respond to these three physicians who are clearly calling for physicians to exhibit more humility in our practice of medicine? Do we know how to affect this change in behavior in our colleagues and ourselves? T. S. Eliot once wrote, “Humility is the most difficult of all virtues; nothing dies harder than the desire to think well of oneself.” (‪Shakespeare and the Stoicism of Seneca.‬ ‪An address read before the Shakespeare Association 18th March, 1927)‬

 

The English words humility and humble are derived from the Latin noun humilitas and the adjective humilis which can be defined as grounded, from the earth, respectful, unassuming, modest, and low. Humility is often contrasted with the terms pride, haughtiness, and arrogance (See the Frank Lloyd Wright quotation at the beginning of this post). Humility has been held up as a virtue in both religious and ethical writings.

 

Pride and arrogance are commonplace among physicians and provide the punch line for the famous New Yorker cartoon where a physician goes to the front of the line in heaven “because he thinks he is God.” In the Christian tradition, part of humility is self-knowledge about the limits of one’s own skills, knowledge, and authority. (http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Humble)

 

When a professional like a physician or a teacher does have superior content knowledge when compared to the patient or the student, arrogance is an all too common attitude. Bertrand Russell was talking about teaching, but his lesson applies to physicians as well:

 

“In the presence of a child [the teacher] feels an unaccountable humility – a humility not easily defensible on any rational ground, and yet somehow nearer to wisdom than the easy self-confidence of many parents and teachers.” (http://www.williamhare.org/assets/hare_humilityasvirtue.pdf)

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