Justin's Geographical Thingy
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Place and Flash Mobs

The idea of flash mobs has spread quickly, diffusing at a time when online video sharing can immortalize the moment in time and social media can amplify the audience beyond just one place.


Via Seth Dixon
Justin Cardoso's insight:

we saw this flash mob in my first geography class and i just thought that it was amazing how many people gathered around to listen to the street performers.  i also love how it escalated so quickly from a single performer into a complete orcastra in a matter of a couple minutes. #georic

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Jimmy Power's comment, December 25, 2012 4:30 AM
Love it
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:02 PM

I love the consept of a flash mob. How a planed performace can start in the steet and instantly people are attracted and engaged. They are done all over the world, but where the mob takes place is the important part. The location of the mob is more likeley to be in a popular city, or near a highly populated area (park, beach, ect..).  Its important to realize how something like this would serve no signicinace if it was done say at a shopping center in a surban town. Its also interesting to see what the message of the mob is, this video was more of just entertainment while some mobs have clear messages that there trying to comminucate to socioty.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:38 AM

The people who were apart of this flashmob picked a very good place to do it. They decided to do it rightin the center of a town or market area where many people would notice them. They wanted everyone to focus their attention on them even if it was just for a few minutes. If they were to pick an are that was not in a city or town area not that many people would be gathered around and watching them. 

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Justin's Geographical Thingy | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html


Via Seth Dixon
Justin Cardoso's insight:

well i have always wanted to go and see Venice. i always thought of it as being an amazing achievement of human engineering. the city on the water. i know a couple milimeters a year isnt that bad, but at that rate im worried my childrens children may only be able to hear about the wonderful city of Venice in the history books and never in person. hopefully we find a way to keep Venice afloat for many more generations. #georic

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

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A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums

A stunning turn that could silence Syria war drums | Justin's Geographical Thingy | Scoop.it
While light on details, a Russian proposal for Syria to turn over chemical weapons shifts the war debate.
Justin Cardoso's insight:

i seriously hope this whole Syria business can be solved without any American bloodshed. this is not our problem to handle. we have our own issues on our own land to worry about. we have no need for a war with them.#georic

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Place and Flash Mobs

The idea of flash mobs has spread quickly, diffusing at a time when online video sharing can immortalize the moment in time and social media can amplify the audience beyond just one place.


Via Seth Dixon
Justin Cardoso's insight:

we saw this flash mob in my first geography class and i just thought that it was amazing how many people gathered around to listen to the street performers.  i also love how it escalated so quickly from a single performer into a complete orcastra in a matter of a couple minutes. #georic

more...
Jimmy Power's comment, December 25, 2012 4:30 AM
Love it
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:02 PM

I love the consept of a flash mob. How a planed performace can start in the steet and instantly people are attracted and engaged. They are done all over the world, but where the mob takes place is the important part. The location of the mob is more likeley to be in a popular city, or near a highly populated area (park, beach, ect..).  Its important to realize how something like this would serve no signicinace if it was done say at a shopping center in a surban town. Its also interesting to see what the message of the mob is, this video was more of just entertainment while some mobs have clear messages that there trying to comminucate to socioty.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:38 AM

The people who were apart of this flashmob picked a very good place to do it. They decided to do it rightin the center of a town or market area where many people would notice them. They wanted everyone to focus their attention on them even if it was just for a few minutes. If they were to pick an are that was not in a city or town area not that many people would be gathered around and watching them. 

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Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | Justin's Geographical Thingy | Scoop.it

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.


Via Seth Dixon
Justin Cardoso's insight:

the wold cities quiz was pretty cool.I got stuck on the northern most city one for a bit though. lol

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 6:54 PM

I love this geography, map-based quiz that let's people explore the world as they learn about some interesting places.  

Douglas Vance's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

This is a brand new and to me, a unique way of exploring global geography by using trivia questions as a means to explore the world.

Kami Romeike's curator insight, April 8, 5:29 PM

I love this geography, map-based quiz that let's people explore the world as they learn about some interesting places.