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To keep and bear arms

To keep and bear arms | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
WITH one of the highest murder rates among OECD countries—second only to Mexico—America retains its reputation as a disproportionately dangerous...

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I am a firm believer in the second amendment, to keep and bear arms.  I think that people are going to kill if they want to.  It isn’t a choice you make just because you have a gun.  There is rational thought behind it.  People blame guns too much, it just does not make any sense to me. 

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The Confusing Science of Stoned Driving | VICE | United States

The Confusing Science of Stoned Driving | VICE | United States | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it

The trick, when it comes to marijuana and driving, involves determining what exactly “dangerously impaired” means. Ask a few average all-American, pot-smoking teenagers, and they'll likely say there's no such thing. A recent survey conducted by insurance giant Liberty Mutual, for example, found that among teens who admitted to driving after consuming cannabis, more than 70 percent self-reported no negative effects whatsoever on their competence behind the wheel, including 34 percent who believed, however dubiously, that getting blazed was actually performance enhancing.

Meanwhile, at least ten states mandate severe penalties for any trace of THC in a roadside drug test, even inactive metabolites that remain detectable up to a month after use.


Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

If it alters your mood, mind, behavior and you are behind a wheel you should be arrested for driving under the influence (DUI).  Anything that alters your behavior and you make the rational choice to get behind the wheel of a vehicle it quickly raises the risks for a recipe for disaster.  It really depends on the user how they act while under the influence but they are under the influence, which should be illegal.  It is only fair.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 25, 2015 1:02 PM

We need to charge under the old "impairment" section of the DUI code and go back to performing thorough Field Sobriety Tests (FST's).  FST's have taken a real hit in terms of officers being thorough since the advent of .08, Admin per se (where folks must submit to a test or lose their license), and the introduction of the portable breathalyzer.  Let's face it, we just don't do FST's like we once did...time to go back to the old practice.

 

If someone is impaired by THC/Cannabis, then we should arrest; but, not otherwise.

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Mankato police chief's license suspended for training errors

The board found the 12 new officers were not trained in police pursuit or emergency vehicle operations before taking their licensing exams. But the settlement said "it is undisputed" that the officers got that training before operating an emergency vehicle.
Miller told the Star Tribune on Friday the document proves his department's mistakes were "clerical, process or timing issues" — in one case using an equivalent, but incorrect, form.
"There's nothing intentional. There is no misrepresentation," he said.
City Manager Pat Hentges called the findings "irregularities," and said there were no grounds to discipline Miller.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

The board found the 12 new part time officers were not trained for police and emergency pursuit.  In my opinion I do not think that a board should have any say whether or not if a peace officer is suspended/fired or whatever.  I think it is up to the people of the community where the peace officer is serving.  It is a city position so I think it should be the people of the cities decision.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 26, 2015 1:06 AM

I dislike a system where a political body can suspend a Chief's license.  If the Chief is not a good chief, his city should discipline him/her.

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Gruesome weekend leaves Chicago police chief reeling - CNN.com

When a city has seven killings in two days, including the death of a 7-year-old boy, something is systemically wrong.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

So, if 7 killings a day in a city means that something is wrong with the system I also think that it has a lot to do with the community as well.  You cannot blame the system for people murdering other people.  There is a lot of crazy people who are influenced by crazy stuff.  The system cannot stop a repeat offender from offending unless they keep them locked up for a long time.  Inorder for this to happen the offender has to do something drastic enough to get locked up.

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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 2015 8:39 PM
This is a very sad story right here. I do agree with the statement "if Amari's dad was in jail he would still be with us today." Amari's dad had been arrested 45 times is a bit on the ridiculous side if you ask me. What happened to 3 strikes and you are out rule? What makes Amari's dad special that he wasn't put away for a while since his excessive arrest record. I want to believe that our justice systems are there to rehabilitate those that are entering them but this just makes me believe that they are so full there is no one being rehabilitated. I hope too that they find the other gang member that shot and killed Amari is put away for a very long time. Maybe they can make an example out of him so the other gang members can learn a lesson. But I know that is wishful thinking at this point.
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The Worst Things That Have Ever Happened at the Dentist | VICE | United States

If your mouth hurts like a mother after a root canal, at least you didn't wake up with permanent brain damage or all your teeth missing.

...or had a fake dentist...or been raped while under anesthesia....


Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Going to the dentist has always been a eerie feeling, the smell of the office the sounds of the machines that are running, and the look of other patients that are present in the dentist office.  I think there are some doctors that are unethical but I feel that this article is trying to scare its readers to thinking that you are at risk for suffering from something when you go to the dentists office.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 9, 2015 2:36 PM

White Collar Crime, plus some regular old predator behavior....

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Brazilian Car Chase VS Aerial Platform Sniper - The Firearm Blog

Brazilian Car Chase VS Aerial Platform Sniper - The Firearm Blog | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
A video was released by Patrulha Policial (Police Patrol) on YouTube. The video appears to be from the body camera of a Brazilian officer, in a helicopter, observing a runaway suspect involved in a high speed pursuit with other Brazilian officers. The sniper next to him appears to be using a FAL.   Warning: Some …

Read More …

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

It is amazing how different our police handle situations compared to other places.  It seems that institutions do not take more risks to handle a situation.  I thought some of the shots taken from the helicopter was pretty intense but you could tell the shooter was taking shots when he had the opportunity, this being that there was less chances of accidently shooting someone else.  It seemed that his shots were on target.  Some countries have higher and more violent crime rates so I think it is understandable that violence is fought with violence.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 12, 2015 2:29 PM

We're a lot different than the rest of the world.  See these cops in a pursuit with a chopper door gunner.  At 1:07, I'm amazed that he starts opening fire at the car.

 

Warning: graphic at the end, they show the suspect who is shot.

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The lawyer who handled Dylann Roof's drug case says he seemed like "just a normal kid."

The lawyer who handled Dylann Roof's drug case says he seemed like "just a normal kid." | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
Roof was previously arrested in March. Here's what else we know.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I'm wondering if he suffered from opiate abuse because he was carrying some on him while he was arrested the first time for drug possession.  His shooting is being called a hate crime, sounds like he has some other things going on in his head that needs to be evaluated because this is pretty horrible stuff.  

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Jay Fulk's comment, June 20, 2015 12:11 AM
This is a really tough one to take in. Lately, every time black person is killed, it turns into a huge racial issue. The problem is that they are usually never a racial issue to begin with. In this case, it doesn't get any clearer that this was racially motivated and is definitely classified as a hate crime. First of all, I don't even understand why people have such racial hatred in their hearts. It just doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever. Why does the color of a persons skin matter so much that it ends up in mass murder? I pray for the families of those lost in this tragedy and I pray for Dylann and his family.
William Estrin's comment, June 20, 2015 2:11 PM
I have been following this case very closely because it shocked me and I'm struggling to comprehend why a seemingly harmless kid would commit such a hateful act in a place people come to worship and find peace. I mean there are millions of people in this country who are antisocial, loners, and have some mental issues going on and they are absolutely harmless and never cause any problems to society. But then there a minute few such as this guy, the Colorado theater shooter, and the Boston Marathon bomber who go on to commit unspeakable acts of hate and violence. What I want to know is if there are ways we can detect these select few loners that are potentially dangerous versus the vast majority that are harmless. Is there some sort of psychological abnormality all these people possess that can be detected by a trained professional? Perhaps when Roof had been previously arrested, he should have had a psychological evaluation to determine if he was possibly dangerous. People like this give all loners a bad name. I mean I'm not necessarily the most social person in the world, I've had my struggles, and I like to be alone, but I would never in a million years harm a fly. My sympathy goes out to the community of Charleston and the family of the victims of this senseless tragedy. The governor of South Carolina announced that she will urge prosecutors to seek the death penalty against Roof and I fully support that. It was premeditated, he knew exactly what he was doing, he waited patiently until he felt the time was right, and he was completely unprovoked and murdered nine innocent people who had done nothing wrong against him. If this isn't deserving of the death penalty, then I don't know what is.
Bethany McNutt's comment, June 23, 2015 1:07 PM
I picked this article because of the headline, he seemed like “just a normal kid.” This caught my attention because it makes you truly wonder what causes people who seem to be “normal” commit such heinous and horrific crimes. How could someone who seems completely normal go into a church and shoot almost a dozen people? Is it nature VS nurture? Is he mentally ill? Does he live in a less fortunate home and are his acts a desperate cry for help? Since he seems like “just a normal kid” I believe his actions and motivations are much deeper than what we see on the surface. However, since I don’t know much about who he is as a person or his upbringing, it’s very hard to determine which factors contributed to him committing such an awful hate crime. It’s strange to me how someone who looks completely normal can tell their roommate things such as how he wanted to start a civil war, was in favor of segregation, and would kill himself. I’m curious to see how the court proceedings go with this case.
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Arrest made in case of dog found with muzzle taped shut

Arrest made in case of dog found with muzzle taped shut | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
Police in North Charleston have arrested a suspect in a dog abuse case that's made headlines around the country.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Well, you have to wonder what drove the owner of this dog to engage in a horrid act on an animal this like.  In my opinion this gives me more insight to what law enforcement has to engage in everyday.  Not only do they have to deal with calls against persons but animals as well.  This makes the job harder because it compels the police force to be more aware of different criminal activities that happen in cities.  I can see how it could be a problem because some people may not think that animals deserve the same treatment as people but animals are beings too.

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Angela Perry's comment, June 3, 2015 5:11 PM
This is a very sad story of cruelty towards animals. I am very glad that the suspect was apprehended, as he should face the steepest penalty that could be imposed on him. Animals are just not pets, they are members of our families. This is not allowed to be done to little children so why let this be done to an animal. Animals are like young children that can't speak or say what they want yet and he had the audacity to tape the dog's mouth shut. I sure would hate to see what he would do to a child that wouldn't stop crying.
Jay Fulk's comment, June 3, 2015 8:43 PM
Animal abuse of this nature definitely deserves harsh punishment for the offender. If a person feels the need to react this way to an animal, how far away are they from reacting in a similar manner towards a human being? I firmly believe that murders and violent offenders often start by harming animals. That is why I believe that the punishment for animal cruelty and torture should be extensive and serve as a deterrent. If a guy gets 5 years in prison for animal cruelty charges, then he will probably connect the dots and understand that harming a human being will carry a much heavier penalty.
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New Meds Block Heroin Craving, But Reporter Finds Treatment Centers Don't Use Them

New Meds Block Heroin Craving, But Reporter Finds Treatment Centers Don't Use Them | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
The Huffington Post's Jason Cherkis investigated the heroin epidemic in Kentucky, and found that the abstinence-based approach used in most treatment centers was leading to many fatal relapses.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Well, it sounds like the drug only satisfies the cravings for narcotics such as heroin because suboxone is a type of opioid, which is otherwise known as a narcotic.  Taking this drug will temporarily sate your cravings for narcotics and helps with withdrawals.  I found this article to be a bit misleading because it makes it sound like this drug Suboxone to be a wonder drug to cure people of narcotic addiction.  I just don’t really know how I feel about this article, other than it to be misleading.

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A year after marijuana legalisation in Colorado, 'everything's fine' confirm police

A year after marijuana legalisation in Colorado, 'everything's fine' confirm police | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
It's been a year since Colorado became the first state in the US to legalise marijuana, and its impact on health, crime, employment and other factors can now be more empirically measured.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I find the whole idea of legalizing marijuana very interesting,  I am curious to find out what will happen to future crime rates and impaired driving and regulations that come of legalizing it. Also with illegal drug dealers.  In my opinion, I think I am indifferent with the whole idea legalizing the substance.

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Gaynor Johansen's comment, January 21, 2015 4:53 PM
I find the whole concept of legal marijuana rather intriguing for several reasons. The first reason is that even if a state legalizes it the Federal law still considers it illegal. Another reason is how it affects the community by being legal. Overall I support the legalization because of many of the reasons stated in the article like it creates jobs, seems to lower the number of youth but also it makes it safer since the government can regulate it and we can tax it so the state can have more money.
Julius Matilainen's comment, January 22, 2015 2:43 AM
In my opinion this is a good example that crime is also a product of its time and it kind a mirrors the values od the society at current time. Hey, it is not that many years that being gay was considered as a crime…

I must say that I am not surprised that the effects have been positive or neutral. And I honestly believe that this might be the real first step of getting upper hand in war against drugs. I am not saying that other drugs should be legalized, but I prefer carrot over stick in this problem. All and all It is about education, if kids can be taught about the effects of marijuana in a safe environment without the pressure of the group of addicts and in secrecy, which usually is the environment currently, fewer young people choose to continue using it, right?
Kyle May's comment, January 26, 2015 3:42 AM
I'm interested in the affect that this may have on paper production, and whether it will take a sizeable share out of that market.
I guess we are going to be seeing first hand very soon what 'legal' Marijuana will do to our community. With North Pole up in arms to ban it, and Fairbanks more following the idea that business is business, they'll either do it here or elsewhere.
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Doctor shot at Brigham & Women's hospital in Boston dies, police say - The Boston Globe

Doctor shot at Brigham & Women's hospital in Boston dies, police say - The Boston Globe | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
A 2012 study of news reports by the Johns Hopkins Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response identified 154 shootings from 2000 through 2011, with 235 injured or dead. The most common victim was the shooter, 45 percent, and physicians and nurses were rarely victims, the study found.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

This is a clear case of intent to inflict harm on someone.  Some of the comments here state that stronger gun laws should be established but my opinion will remain the same.  If someone is intending to harm another person they will find a way to do so.  If a gun is not within reach, the offender will find a way to inflict intended harm.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, January 21, 2015 1:44 AM

A 2012 study of news reports by the Johns Hopkins Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response identified 154 shootings from 2000 through 2011, with 235 injured or dead. The most common victim was the shooter, 45 percent, and physicians and nurses were rarely victims, the study found.

Rob Duke's comment, January 21, 2015 6:01 PM
Jeffrey, yes, just from a theory standpoint, there's very little evidence that people are deterred from crime by laws or punishment. Add emotion and people become irrational.
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Robbery with a twist: Both the suspects and the victim in New Mexico robbery facing charges

Robbery with a twist: Both the suspects and the victim in New Mexico robbery facing charges | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
The driver and the passenger were robbed by three men, but after the robbery took place the driver mowed down two of the robbers as they attempted to escape.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Could this case be used as a self-defense case?   The article says that using a vehicle, as a weapon is not excusable.  Could it be justified if it were for self-defense?

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Christopher L. Baca's comment, August 16, 2015 4:28 PM
I don't agree with having hit the men with a vehicle, or in fact using any sort of violence to stop any one, but in responce to Jeffery's comment, I don't believe that this could be thought of as a self defense case due to that the action had already occurred and that the man had actually go after the men proving to be aggressive rather than defensive.
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Dashcam footage clearly shows the real reason Sandra Bland changed lanes in the first place

Dashcam footage clearly shows the real reason Sandra Bland changed lanes in the first place | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
Upon analysis, it quickly confirms something Bland herself states later to the officer—the only reason she changed lanes, which the officer claimed was his rationale for pulling her over, was so that she could get out of the way for his patrol car.

As you will see below, when Sandra Bland turns onto University Drive, she gets a significant distance away from Officer Encinia, who was driving in the opposite direction, but made a sudden U-turn and mashed on the gas to catch up to Bland's vehicle. His speed is evident as he barrels down the road, which has a speed limit of 20 mph.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I personally think there has to be another reason that the police officer pulled the driver over.  It is hard to analyze video footage, especially if there is not any audio for majority of the footage.  She could have been looking at a phone, or texting, calling.  That could be the reason the driver did not use a turn signal to switch lanes.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 24, 2015 12:15 PM

It's hard to argue that this wasn't a pre-text stop....

DERRICK NELSON's comment, July 26, 2015 7:32 PM
From the footage being shown it was a legitimate stop for improper lane change. However, there was no reason for the officer to gain entry into said car to pull out the traffic offender (Sandra Bland). Sandra should've still performed a proper lane signaling as she was getting out of the way of the patrol car to let the officer go by. Officer Encinia used unnecessary force resulting in his corrupt behavior.
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Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime

Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
The Anchorage Police Department has asked the city to deploy a drastic, rarely-used tool known as criminal abatement if things don't change. The city would go through a judicial process to seize the property from its owner.

The technique is used only in “exceptional circumstances,” said Gary Gilliam, head of the Anchorage Police Department’s Community Action Policing team. He couldn’t think of the last time it was used against a private homeowner.

“You don’t want the government to suddenly come in and take somebody’s property, like right now. There has to be due process. This is huge: You’re taking a man’s home from him.”

Fenner, a former municipal snowplow driver who retired after an on-the-job injury, denies his neighbors' claims. He says they have launched a campaign to harass him with “nonsense” calls to the police.

“I’m not trying to damage the neighborhood,” he said.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Police say that they have visited this home 51 times in one year, that is a very high response rate to one address.  The whole city is expanding and crime rates are on the rise as well.  Anchorage is a town that people talk about and are beginning to fear because of the daily shootings in Downtown Anchorage and it’s neighborhoods.    It is obvious that something needs to be done to fix problems like this but I imagine very difficult to do so. 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 6, 2015 12:17 PM

This is a Problem Oriented Policing tool normally reserved for seedy motels, and crack houses....what do you think about it's use here?

Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 7:33 PM
After reading this article, I am a bit shocked at the number of police calls to one single house. It's obvious that something has to be done, but I'm not sure that seizing his home is the right way to go. I think a force-sale would be more adequate. If he's forced to sell the house, then the new owners can bring respectability back to the property. The guy's defense is pretty pathetic. He honestly thinks that the neighborhood just hates him for no reason? With that much police activity, I would just force him to sell the house or have it seized if he doesn't agree to it.
Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 7:34 PM
A force sale would then make sure that he financially benefits from his investment.
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U.S. heroin use jumps as costs drop, prescription opiate use rises

Heroin overdose deaths in the United States nearly quadrupled between 2002 and 2013, fueled by lower costs as well as increased abuse of prescription opiate painkillers, U.S. health officials said on

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I think drugs are going to be one of the reasons that ruins our youth and its future, people are well aware of the dangers of using drugs but people get so caught up in it that they do not care of the dangers and eventually they get past the point of quitting because they are ruined.  The article states that the overdose deaths have quadrupled within a 11 year period.

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Marei Benton's comment, July 10, 2015 2:27 AM
Heroin will be the death of this country (no pun intended)... Working in the prison system, I must say that it seems like half of everyone there is there for drug charges.
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Killer Pharmacy: Inside a Medical Mass Murder Case

Killer Pharmacy: Inside a Medical Mass Murder Case | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
How a seemingly innocuous pharmacy was making millions of dollars by cutting corners, fabricating records and ignoring laws designed to keep contaminated drugs off the market.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

It is quite sad that innocent people have to die just so organizations can make a profit.  Stuff like this seems to happen often and goes on ignored and is very sad that people die from pharm malpractice, it seems like this is something that could be avoided.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, July 9, 2015 2:53 PM

Pharm malpractice kills 100,000 a year, which doesn't begin to account for those injured or just not helped by Big Pharm's over-prescription of Americans.

 

Imagine if law enforcement killed this many people a year!

Marei Benton's comment, July 10, 2015 1:58 AM
My life is nothing if not ironic... As an RN, I dispense medications daily at work... In my private life, however, I avoid hospitals at all costs and the only medications I will occasionally take is Ibuprofen when my back is acting up... This story is absolutely horrific; I literally am at a loss for words... I don't generally support the death penalty, but in cases like this, I think that I do... These people betrayed a very sacred trust that the public places in its medical staff... On a more positive note, this article reconfirmed my belief that the CDC is totally bad-ass, and I can't believe that a 34 year-old doctor was one of the main providers that helped catch them. She's younger than I am!!
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First of 'Fairbanks Four' leaves prison for halfway house

First of 'Fairbanks Four' leaves prison for halfway house | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
Marvin Roberts, one of the so-called Fairbanks Four convicted of beating a 15-year-old to death in 1997, left prison Wednesday as questions about the men's guilt remain unresolved.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I do not know much about the Fairbanks Four but I do find that one of the four gets to leave prison for a half way house.  But I cannot tell even from my own opinion about who I even think is in the wrong here.  I suppose just because someone have confessed to the crime, does not exactly mean that it is to be true.  False confessions happen all the time on both opposing sides.

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Defendant backs out of plea agreement in Western Alaska platinum mining case

Defendant backs out of plea agreement in Western Alaska platinum mining case | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
A defendant in a major Western Alaska pollution case has changed his mind and is withdrawing from his agreement to plead guilty, according to filings in U.S. District Court in Anchorage this week.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

This is from my neck of the bush, right across the bay from where I was raised anyway.  I personally find this atrocious because everyone from this region relies on subsistence fishing to get by for the winter months.  I personally would never feel the same way again if I was fishing from the streams that the waste was dumped into.  It is difficult to police the southwest regions or any rural areas because of the vast geographical distances law enforcement officers have to travel to respond to certain cases.  Which also makes me glad that they were able to indict the people who were responsible for the mess.  

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Raising the Minimum Wage Will Have No Effect on Jobs

Raising the Minimum Wage Will Have No Effect on Jobs | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
According to an analysis of 64 different studies.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

Raising minimum wages would seem to have companies hiring people with more experience opposed to those who are young and new to job searching.  Having the minimum wages increase may have its advantages, but I am a little skeptical about what would happen to workers with the less experience.

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Rob Duke's comment, February 7, 2015 12:14 AM
That depends entirely on the elasticity of the sector. If the sector is in high demand, then price can probably stretch to cover the extra expense; however, if the item is not in high demand, then the "incidence" of the cost increase (not unlike a tax in this case) would likely fall on the business owner. In actual practice what we find in most industries is that 1/2 the tax is passed on to the consumer and businesses absorb the rest from their former profits.
Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 1:53 AM
As it's been said, raising the minimum wage would be a temporary fix to a long running issue. I've had this conversation with different people and we come across a certain middle ground that we can all agree on.
For service industries such as McDonalds where most younger people work at, the increase in salary should be minimal. However, if say an employee is a mother/father or a main supporter in their family or meets certain criteria, they should be eligible for a higher increase in pay. These workers should have to submit to drug testing while they receive this higher rate of income and have to fulfill different forms and meet certain needs to be eligible to these benefits.
Raising the bar for every job would hurt our economy in a tremendous way and as said before, would only be a fix for the short run. Prices on many goods and services would increase as labor costs rose and it would create this never ending cycle of "I 'need' more to survive in this economy."
Rob Duke's comment, February 9, 2015 3:11 AM
I'm more for "let the market sort out wages" if we had affordable benefits and housing (I don't mean "free", but within reach, but also, with incentive to move on, when possible).
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Growing Up Poor Has Effects on Your Children Even If You Escape Poverty

Growing Up Poor Has Effects on Your Children Even If You Escape Poverty | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
Breaking the cycle of poverty is more difficult than just moving out or moving up.

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I personally believe that you tend to grow up to be what your environment consists of.  Just because you make it out of poverty, moving out or moving up would not change how you always come about doing things.  You tend to carry it around as a weight on your shoulders unless you try to shake it off. People basically absorb their environments, that is my opinion.

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Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 2:17 AM
This article directly goes into learned behaviors that branch off of Differential Association Theory. Directly from the article, there is a multitude of facts and figures that support the notion of Differential Association theory and the affects that an environment has on individuals. Even if you get away from those environments, individuals learned skills and ideas to thrive in these types of areas and as such will have a higher rate of continued use with these already learned behaviors.
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Is It Possible to Find Unbiased Jurors in High-Profile Cases? (Is It Ever Possible?)

Is It Possible to Find Unbiased Jurors in High-Profile Cases? (Is It Ever Possible?) | Just 251x Criminology | Scoop.it
This week, hundreds of Americans are skipping work in order to audition for starring roles in three high-profile criminal trials being staged around the country. The defendants in all three cases—the alleged killer of 6-year-old Etan Patz, in New York; the alleged Aurora shooter, in Colorado; and the alleged Boston...

Via Rob Duke
Jeffrey Evan's insight:

I do not think that it is ever possible to have jurors leave biases at home.  These alleged criminals are being tried in high-profile cases, and they are labeled as bad people.  I think it is human nature to not be able to think biased.  Once people get their mind on something, they generally stick to that thought.

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Rob Duke's comment, January 25, 2015 1:19 AM
Yes, I agree. At best we hope that folks are aware of those biases and not let them unfairly impact their judgement.