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Perché gli italiani credono alle bufale su Facebook - Wired

Perché gli italiani credono alle bufale su Facebook - Wired | Journalism | Scoop.it
«Ieri il Senato della Repubblica ha approvato con 257 voti a favore e 165 astenuti», si leggeva in un post ...
socialNONmente's insight:

"A scambiare più spesso la satira e le bufale diffuse dai troll politici per fatti sono i lettori che frequentano maggiormente le pagine di «controinformazione». Ovvero, proprio quelli più critici dei media tradizionali; che li ritengono cioè più corrotti, manipolati e incapaci di dare notizie affidabili..."

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The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion

The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion | Journalism | Scoop.it

"News sources can't just give us the facts. They must tell us what those facts mean."


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, February 24, 2014 4:55 PM



Here's a refreshing look at the future of news that highlights the importance of going deeper into creating value for readers by providing more focus, relevance, context and opinion.

These are the characters that properly define what we now refer to as "curation" when it comes to content and news.


The following passages, extracted from the book, The News: A User's Manual, are by Alain de Botton, and have been excerpted from a lengthy article on The Week entitled "The Future of News".


"News organizations are coy about admitting that what they present us with each day are minuscule extracts of narratives whose true shape and logic can generally only emerge from a perspective of months or even years — and that it would hence often be wiser to hear the story in chapters rather than snatched sentences.


They [news organizations] are institutionally committed to implying that it is inevitably better to have a shaky and partial grasp of a subject this minute than to wait for a more secure and comprehensive understanding somewhere down the line.


...


We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends.


To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to "put" it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about.


A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed.


... the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call "feeling bored" is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.


...We might need help in transporting such orphaned pieces of information to the stacks that would most appropriately reveal their logic.


...it is news organizations to take on some of this librarian's work. It is for them to give us a sense of the larger headings under which minor incidents belong."

 


The call for understanding how much greater value can be provided by curating news and information in depth, rather than by following the shallow, buzzy and viral path beaten by HuffPo, Buzzfeed and the rest of the gang, is clear.


But beyond context and depth, real value can only be added if we accept the fact that going beyond the classic "objective fact reporting", by adding opinion and bias in a transparent fashion, can actually provide greater value in many ways, as Alain de Botton clearly explains:


"Unfortunately for our levels of engagement, there is a prejudice at large within many news organizations that the most prestigious aspect of journalism is the dispassionate and neutral presentation of "facts."


...


The problem with facts is that there is nowadays no shortage of sound examples. The issue is not that we need more of them, but that we don't know what to do with the ones we have...


...But what do these things actually mean? How are they related to the central questions of political life? What can they help us to understand?


...The opposite of facts is bias. In serious journalistic quarters, bias has a very bad name. It is synonymous with malevolent agendas, lies, and authoritarian attempts to deny audiences the freedom to make up their own minds.


Yet we should perhaps be more generous toward bias.


In its pure form, a bias simply indicates a method of evaluating events that is guided by a coherent underlying thesis about human functioning and flourishing.


It is a pair of lenses that slide over reality and aim to bring it more clearly into focus.


Bias strives to explain what events mean and introduces a scale of values by which to judge ideas and events. It seems excessive to try to escape from bias per se; the task is rather to find ways to alight on its more reliable and fruitful examples. 


There are countless worthy lenses to slide between ourselves and the world." 


Overall, these ideas offer a truly refreshing look at the future of news and at the relevance that context and opinion could play in transforming this medium from a vehicle of mass distraction to one of focused learning and understanding for those interested. 



Must read. Rightful. Insightful. 9/10



Full article: http://theweek.com/article/index/256737/the-future-of-news 


Reading time: 10':20"






Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 25, 2014 2:36 PM

El futuro de las Noticias no es sobre los Hechos, sino sobre contexto, relevancia y opinión.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:12 AM

 Intéressant 

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Using social media in news coverage

Tips for integrating Twitter, Storify, Facebook, Google Plus and much more into your newsroom. Presentation at workshop for International Press Institute World Congress in Amman, Jordan, 2013.


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La passione per le cattive notizie - #Ferrara

La passione per le cattive notizie - #Ferrara | Journalism | Scoop.it
E’ noto che le cattive notizie attraggono l’attenzione di più di quelle buone. Ogni giornalista lo sa: le cattive notizie aumentano le tirature dei quot
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2014 will be the year of brand journalism

2014 will be the year of brand journalism | Journalism | Scoop.it
2014 will be the year of brand journalism - SHIFT Communications PR Agency | Boston | New York | San Francisco
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È falso che in Grecia metà degli infetti ha preso l'Aids per avere sussidi

È falso che in Grecia metà degli infetti ha preso l'Aids per avere sussidi | Journalism | Scoop.it
Prima di riportare una notizia, quale essa sia, è doveroso riscontrarne la pressoché totale certezza. Questo vale sempre, ma deve valere un po' di più, se lo concedete, quando si parla della salute delle persone.
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Ebyline Launches WordPress Plugin To Pay Freelancers - 10,000 Words

Ebyline Launches WordPress Plugin To Pay Freelancers - 10,000 Words | Journalism | Scoop.it
Ebyline Launches WordPress Plugin To Pay Freelancers
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» Doctored photo with tornado *and* UFO is posted on Indianapolis TV station website JIMROMENESKO.COM

» Doctored photo with tornado *and* UFO is posted on Indianapolis TV station website JIMROMENESKO.COM | Journalism | Scoop.it

Via Mark Tatge
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Immersive Storytelling and Presentation Tools for Journalists

Immersive Storytelling and Presentation Tools for Journalists | Journalism | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Moses B. Tambason's curator insight, November 15, 2013 10:21 PM

Watch this video to help the special needs in Africa this thanks giving holiday http://www.africatube.net/video/932/Neglected-people-of-Africa-need-your-help ;

Gianfranco Marini's curator insight, November 17, 2013 1:21 PM

Da http://www.journalism.co.uk 9 strumenti web based per lo storytelling. Si tratta di strumenti che consentono di realizzare storie visuali con elementi multimediali e interattivi.

 

Utili per la content curation e per realizzare presentazioni.

 

Possono essere utilizzati senza problemi nelal didattica per realizzare raccolte e/o narrazioni di eventi e/o problemi di carattere disciplinare e interdisciplinare.

Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, March 28, 2016 11:35 PM



Here is a good collection of nine web tools that allow you to create multimedia-rich, visual story-telling, immersive stories and reports alongside some impressive examples.


My comments: Great tools list showcasing a nice array of visual presentation tools that can be effectively for journalistic reporting.


Useful. Resourceful. Great examples. 8/10


Original article: http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/9-tools-for-journalists-to-produce-immersive-stories/s2/a554425/ ;







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Brand journalism, le aziende "senza filtro" - Corriere delle Comunicazioni

Brand journalism, le aziende "senza filtro" - Corriere delle Comunicazioni | Journalism | Scoop.it
Corriere delle Comunicazioni
Brand journalism, le aziende "senza filtro"
Corriere delle Comunicazioni
È il giornalismo visto dalle aziende, per le quali il brand journalism è una sorta di “ufficio stampa 2.0”.
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Journalism *is* curation: tips on curation tools and techniques

Journalism *is* curation: tips on curation tools and techniques | Journalism | Scoop.it

Curation is a relatively new term in journalism, but the practice is as old as journalism itself. Every act of journalism is an act of curation: think of how a news report or feature selects and combines elements from a range of sources (first hand sources, background facts, first or second hand colour). Not only that: every act of publishing is, too: selecting and combining different types of content to ensure a news or content ‘mix’. 

 

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos’ in his talk to employees at the Washington Post said: “People will buy a package … they will not pay for a story.” Previously that package was limited to what your staff produced, and wire copy. But as more content becomes digitised, it is possible to combine more content from a wider variety of sources in a range of media - and on any one of a number of platforms.

 

Curation is nothing new – but it is becoming harder...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 1, 2013 4:09 PM

Very interesting perspective  on curation and journalism from Paul Bradshaw. 

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Crowdsourced Content: Beyond Creation and Curation -

Crowdsourced Content: Beyond Creation and Curation - | Journalism | Scoop.it
Multiple resources for crowdsourced content for blogs and websites.
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The apocalypsticle: birth of a new media genre?

The apocalypsticle: birth of a new media genre? | Journalism | Scoop.it
by Vincenzo Marino – translated by Roberta Aiello
How (not) to report the Ukraine crisis on the web

For weeks, protests and street violence in Kiev have dominated the media landscape. This interest of online media in the Ukrainian crisis, and the way (between tragic and frivolous) it has been reported, have prompted Sarah Kendzior of Politico to ask when and how this obsession began, in an article entitled The day we pretended to care about the Ukraine. The author points to the trend of digital media to define the situation with the adjective 'apocalyptic' and to describe the events through catchy phrases and particularly evocative photos, which tend to make the facts spectacular, aimed at getting more visits. Business Insider, Talking Points Memo, BuzzFeed, Mashable, Huffington Post, became involved in a type of reduction into listicles of events that were not at all light or easy to understand (Kendzior speaks of apocalypsticle), through vivid images in sequence, a few numbers and no explanation of the context. The author believes that these websites use disaster porn (the same as that which focuses on photos like those of World War II), ignoring what they could do for Ukrainians through honest journalistic work and paying attention to what Ukrainians can do for them. According to Kendzior, just more traffic.

Emily Bell deals with the issue too in the Guardian. The use of images for sensationalist purpose together with disinterest in the general context are not new practices, nor a result of online journalism - which, however, makes the capture and dissemination easier (here a reflection by Steve Buttry on the idea of rigor in digital and classical journalism). Nevertheless the author wonders if is too shallow to use for complex articles the same techniques as for horses that look like Miley Cyrus. For younger audiences or those disengaged from the mainstream media, one thing is sure: that the exploration of an alien topic – such as Kiev's crisis A/N - will very rarely start with a 5,000-word article on Foreign Policy. Protagonists  such as BuzzFeed, Vice, PolicyMic have the advantage - Bell continues - to attract young audience and bring it to their subjects - such as the conflict - that would not be approached in another way (we all must start somewhere). Whether this is a necessary evil intended to desensitize the public and media, or rather a benefit, is an issue for which more research is needed, Bell concludes.
Live update and verification of sources

foto via
A lot of amateur content (the so-called user generated content) has been spread from the Ukraine, which needs to be verified for a journalistic use. William Pimlott of Editor's Weblog asked Alan O'Riordan of Storyful which is the best method to create order - and cleansing - among masses of live, and amateur, content. Storyful is a platform created to help newsrooms (for example BBC, Al Jazeera, Wall Street Journal) to verify the content produced by social media, and which was purchased last December by NewsCorp for 18 million euros. O'Riordan says to use Twitter lists which he follows personally, keeping an eye on the users who are in the field and selecting those who can be considered more credible after a check made through available tools. After that it is possible to rely on a smaller group of people, although one needs to understand - adds O'Riordan - whether the videos they posted are actually owned by them. Most of the material - he continues - is certainly pertinent, but there is no assurance that it was produced by those who publish it online, with consequent problems of copyright in case it is not possible to attribute with certainty the authorship of the material to those who have shared it. It is crucial to get to the original source, to contact it and obtain the necessary permission.

Among the new products which report live events there is also Reddit. The platform is testing the beta version of a tool that will allow live blogging updates to be published - a move which is defined as crucial for the development of  ''opensource journalism. The platform, which is accessible now only to some users and will later be open to all, has so far been tested on two different topics. An experiment with thousands of people on an old Pokémon video game (A kind of stereotypical Reddit discussion, as Mathew Ingram suggests), and the real-time reported uprisings in Ukraine, in the /r/UkrainianConflict thread. Graphic and technical results are still to be improved, but the development seems to be continuous and rather transparent thanks to a public post in which programmers and beta-testers commented on the use of trying to implement new features almost in real-time. Despite the fact that Reddit is often journalistically associated with the erroneous identification of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect, for Ingram this tool can be useful to bring the practice of journalism to a wider audience. As Jay Rosen of FirstLookMedia stated journalism gets better when more people are doing it and the reader help is fundamental to the process of construction and dissemination of news evoked by Gawker founder Nick Denton, in an interview released this week in Playboy.
The search for an ideal format for the news

Online news always needs new formats and more intuitive methods in order to tell stories, as well as being  economically viable and attractive to readers. One of these is live video, analyzed this week by Dylan Byers of Politico. The author cited some of the most unlucky examples: the Washington Post as well as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal experimented with how to create live TV that turned out to be economically disadvantageous (the Post had invested millions of dollars) and often not attractive to readers and advertisers (Video would not be the savior of online journalism). Traditional TV models simply do not work on the Internet, cost too much, take immense resources and almost always do not correspond to economic expectations: We realized quickly that (...) we would just be 'bad CNBC': CNBC already makes 'great CNBC', so there was no reason for us to make a bad version of it, explained Henry Blodget, founder of Business Insider. An alternative is to look for new formats, to create different content that can survive in the sea of online competition. For example, re-packing segments of videos and posting them on the website after they have aired: this is the technique used by HuffPost Live, which has - according to President Sekoff - 111 million video views (January 2014).

The key is content that is usable on mobile devices, a trend which has become necessary as data shows a growing trend in consumption of mobile news. Therefore, news websites are adapting to the situation. According to Meyer Robinson of The Atlantic (The year most news home pages looked the same), the race to responsive design (the construction of websites which can be read on any device) would bring everybody to conform to a single model: Box. Image. Text. Joshua Benton of NiemanLab talks of the plague of uniform rectangles of BloombergView (just presented and object of the debate), NBC News, Gothamist, TheVerge, Vocativ, Digg, Slate and many others. A phenomenon that wants to build desktop and mobile websites with an easily adapted single structure (geometric shapes), and which risks seriously infecting news on the web. Also on NiemanLab, Joseph Lichterman presents the example of Rookie, a sports website which is searching for a new type of storytelling. There is no lack of rectangles, and inside, after a brief introduction, there are only quotes: choose an event, insert the comment of different characters and build the page (like this) Therefore each element of the news becomes shareable (from the entire article to single phrases), creating a new form of atomization of news.
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Lessons in the crowdsourced verification of news

Lessons in the crowdsourced verification of news | Journalism | Scoop.it
Real-time verification of breaking news increasingly involves the use of crowdsourcing and other social tools, and both Storyful and Reddit’s Syrian civil war forum are good examples of how to do it properly and effectively
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#crowdsourcing and #journalism 

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Is brand journalism really the only way to succeed?

Is brand journalism really the only way to succeed? | Journalism | Scoop.it
I have trouble believing it, but that's what my professors and nearly all the speakers they've invited to our classes are telling us. Us journalism students must define and capitalize on our "perso...
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Four reasons why great photojournalism is art

Four reasons why great photojournalism is art | Journalism | Scoop.it
Great photojournalism is a strange sort of art. Many of its creators do not see themselves as artists, but as ...
socialNONmente's insight:

"Art tolerates any number of sub-genres. Yet the debate may never end over whether news photos are too real to be art. Still, I hope one day our esteemed critics and academics will realize there is a reason some of these pictures simply will not go away. Trying to understand that reason will lead them to an exciting adventure into the art of photojournalism."

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Top 40 Platforms for Crowdfunding Social Change

Top 40 Platforms for Crowdfunding Social Change | Journalism | Scoop.it
socialNONmente's insight:

Crowdfunding’s poster child, Kickstarter, launched in April 2009. It wasn’t the first online crowdfunding platform (ArtistShare launched in 2003), but it was the first to become widely known and scale.  In just 3 and a half years Kickstarter has helped over 32,000 projects raise a total of over $350 million.

But Kickstrater is now just one of over 450 crowdfunding platforms worldwide.  In 2011, these platforms together raised almost $1.5 billion and successfully funded more than one million campaigns. This figure is expected to double to nearly $3 billion by the end of 2012:

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La rivoluzione è finita. E i giornali hanno perso

La rivoluzione è finita. E i giornali hanno perso | Journalism | Scoop.it
Il giornalismo che si sostiene con il native advertising deve rivedere il suo statuto deontologico?
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"La prima nota che occorre appuntare è che la newsletter è un successo economico: il dispositivo del native advertising garantisce entrate più che soddisfacenti dal punto di vista del bilancio di Politico. Gli inserzionisti sono felici di versare 35 mila dollari per una settimana di passaggi nella newsletter di Allen. Si tratta di un dato sensazionale in un mercato, quello del giornalismo, che negli ultimi anni registra quasi solo licenziamenti, riduzioni di redazioni e fallimenti. Mike Allen viaggia a gonfie vele aprendo un varco per i suoi inserzionisti verso le orecchie dei personaggi più potenti d’America."

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So Twitter is ruining journalism? Really?

So Twitter is ruining journalism? Really? | Journalism | Scoop.it
Bronwen Clune: The Australian newspaper published an editorial referring to journalists using Twitter as a 'path to ruin'. It couldn't be more wrong
socialNONmente's insight:

"Here are some of the ways in which Twitter has contributed to journalism (both the profession and the act of it) that is important to our democracy, and not the meaningless "infotainment and fleeting fashions" the editorial suggests it perpetuates.

Egypt and the Middle East. Many journalists, most notably Andy Carvin from NPR (based in the US) and Jess Hill formerly at the ABC (based in Australia) used Twitter to develop trusted sources in Egypt and the Middle East during the 2011 uprisings. They relied on those sources to report and collate what was happening at a time when many media organisations could not get reporters in on the ground. Twitter has also been used to track and analyse political polarisation in Egypt.

The London Riots. During the 2011 riots “citizens collaborated extensively with reporters in the middle of the riots, often advising on and helping refine the coverage.” The Guardian’s Paul Lewis relied on Twitter to connect with citizens on the ground as unrest was unfolding across the capital.

Bin Laden’s death. In May, 2011 it was Keith Urbahn (who formally worked for Donald Rumsfield's office) who broke the news on Twitter that Osama bin Laden had also been killed by the US government.

Asylum seekers in Australia. The Guardian’s Oliver Laughland uses Twitter to get tips on Nauru at a time when the Australian government has developed an aversion to talking to the media about the issue. Laughland has relied on users such as Clint Deidenang to alert him to planes carrying transferred asylum seekers arriving on the island. It was Deidenang who tweeted the first pictures of RPC 3 on Nauru – which is where families and pregnant women are held.

The value of Twitter extends to everyday reporting, with journalists using it to stay on top of their beats. This is particularly useful for journalists reporting in rural areas or niche fields. Jesse Graham from the Mail Newspaper Group said he has search-bars running with the names of some of the towns he covers. “This is particularly useful when CFA incidents occur (such as car crashes or fires), and for finding out about upcoming events that may not be heavily publicised or updates from community groups,” he said.

In response to the editorial’s accusation that Fairfax journalists were not “getting out into the suburbs of our great cities and towns,"

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Live Crisis Map of Disaster Damage Reported on Social Media

Live Crisis Map of Disaster Damage Reported on Social Media | Journalism | Scoop.it
Digital humanitarian volunteers have been busing tagging images posted to social media in the aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda. More specifically, they’ve been using the new MicroMappers ImageClicker to rate the level of damage they see in each image.
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L'Important : l'info par les réseaux sociaux

L'Important : l'info par les réseaux sociaux | Journalism | Scoop.it
Alors que les buzz sans intérêts se multiplient. Alors que des algorithmes sélectionnent les nouvelles selon l'afflux des clics. Alors que l’info dégouline de toute part, L'important choisit parmi les tweets du monde entier ce qui est...important.
socialNONmente's insight:

E’ nato oggi in Francia L'Important, il primo sito web d’informazione “100% #Twitter”creato a partire dai soli messaggi pubblicati sul popolare social network. Il sito limportant raccoglie e seleziona tra i tweet di tutto il mondo “quelli che chiariscono e danno senso” all’attualità con un “approccio umano e non algoritmico dell’informazione”, ha osservato il suo fondatore Claude Posternak, che precisa di non essere#giornalista. Il sito presenta rubriche classiche – “politica”, “mondo”, “economia” o ancora “società” -, ma poi il singolo tweet rinvia al sito del media che ha pubblicato l’informazione. Lanciato oggi sul web, senza pubblicità, limportant.fr è nato in collaborazione con il noto sito di informazione on line #Mediapart.(ANSA, 12 novembre 2013) 

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No, writing for free isn’t slavery, and other misconceptions about the economics of online media

No, writing for free isn’t slavery, and other misconceptions about the economics of online media | Journalism | Scoop.it

Even if you didn’t know that the media industry was in turmoil, you’d be able to guess that something was wrong based on how often financial questions seem to intrude into discussions about journalism and writing in general — questions like “Who is...

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Verification Junkie

Verification Junkie | Journalism | Scoop.it
A growing directory of tools for verifying, fact checking and assessing the validity of social media...
socialNONmente's insight:

Rassegna di tool utili per verificare le news

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socialNONmente's curator insight, November 7, 2013 7:20 PM

A growing directory of tools for verifying, fact checking and assessing the validity of social media and user generated content.