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4.2.3 Sweetpotato butterfly, Acraea acerata (Hewitson 1874) – Risk Atlas for Africa

4.2.3 Sweetpotato butterfly, Acraea acerata (Hewitson 1874) – Risk Atlas for Africa | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
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4.2.1 Sweetpotato weevil, Cylas puncticollis (Boheman 1883) – Risk Atlas for Africa

4.2.1 Sweetpotato weevil, Cylas puncticollis (Boheman 1883) – Risk Atlas for Africa | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
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Farmers’ knowledge and perceptions of potato pests and their management in Uganda | Okonya | Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics (JARTS)

Farmers’ knowledge and perceptions of potato pests and their management in Uganda | Okonya | Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics (JARTS) | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
Farmers’ knowledge and perceptions of potato pests and their management in Uganda
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AJFAND Peer Reviewed Articles - Volume 14 No.5 (2014)

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Protein and iron composition of cowpea leaves: An evaluation of six cowpea varieties grown in Eastern Africa

Abstract

Mineral element, protein-energy and micronutrient deficiencies are primary public health concerns in Eastern and Southern Africa. Promoting the consumption of traditional vegetables such as leaves of cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp could provide cheap sources of protein, micronutrients and mineral elements that can improve the nutritional status of resource-poor subsistence farmers. This study evaluated leaves of two Ugandan cowpea landraces (Icirikukwai and Ebelat) in comparison to four Tanzanian varieties (UG-CP-9, Dakawa, Ex-Iseke and IT 93K-2045-29) for leaf crude protein and iron contents. Tender vegetable leaves of landraces, four cowpea varieties and all possible 2-way, 3-way and 4-way combinations were harvested from three trial sites in the villages of Serere, Kikota and Kogili in eastern Uganda. Near Infrared Spectrometry (NIRS) was used to determine the crude protein content and iron concentration of open-air dried leaf samples. ANOVA for the leaf crude protein content and iron concentration data was done using the GLM procedure of SYSTAT. Leaf crude protein of Icirikukwai and Ebelat was 33.0 and 31.3%, while iron concentration was 332.8 and 379.4 μg/g, respectively. Leaf crude protein for the individual varieties was highest (31.84 %) in UG-CP-9 leaves and lowest (28.02%) in Ex-Iseke variety. Leaf crude protein for 2-way, 3-way and 4-way mixtures was 30.99, 29.98 and 30.32%, respectively. Leaves from Dakawa variety had the highest iron concentration (349.1 μg/g) of the four Tanzanian varieties tested. The mixture involving leaves from all the four varieties had the highest iron concentration values of 266.1 μg/g while 2-way mixtures gave the lowest iron concentration of 253.2 μg/g. Compared to the tested varieties and their mixtures, iron concentration of landraces was not significantly higher. The protein content varied significantly across all the treatments and sites and was relatively high for a plant source. In addition, cowpea leaves are available as food throughout the cropping season and, thus, can be used for improved food security. These benefits, thereby, make cowpea leaves an indispensable tool to improve the nutritional status of resource-poor subsistence farmers in countries where cowpea is grown.

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November 2013- List of Articles

International Academic Journals
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Incidence, abundance and damage by the sweet potato butterfly (Acraea acerata Hew. and the African sweet potato weevils (Cylas spp.) across an altitude gradient in Kabale district, Uganda
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Agriculture & Food Security | Full text | Gender differences in access and use of selected productive resources among sweet potato farmers in Uganda

In spite of women making up the biggest workforce in food production, processing and preparation in Africa, little is known about how women access production resources, especially concerning sweet potato enterprise. Based on the sex of the household head, we compared male and female sweet potato farmers’ access to agricultural information, credit and extension in Uganda. Differences in sweet potato production techniques, contribution of sweet potato to household food security or cash income, off-farm income sources and membership to farmers’ group were also determined.
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Pest Status of Acraea acerata Hew. and Cylas spp. in Sweetpotato (Ipom

Pest Status of Acraea acerata Hew. and Cylas spp. in Sweetpotato (Ipom | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
Pest Status of Acraea acerata Hew. and Cylas spp. in Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) and Incidence of Natural Enemies in the Lake Albert Crescent Agro-ecological Zone of Uganda
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4.2.2 Sweetpotato weevil, Cylas brunneus (Fabricius) – Risk Atlas for Africa

4.2.2 Sweetpotato weevil, Cylas brunneus (Fabricius) – Risk Atlas for Africa | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
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Pest Risk Atlas for Africa freely available online to help national programs supporting smallholder farmers combat the effects associated with climate change on pest management - International Pota...

Pest Risk Atlas for Africa freely available online to help national programs supporting smallholder farmers combat the effects associated with climate change on pest management - International Pota... | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
The International Potato Center (CIP) announces the launch of its free online mobile accessible Pest Risk Atlas for Africa that assesses potential pest risks under current and potential future climate conditions for a number of important pests that effect African agricultural and horticultural crops like potato, sweetpotato, vegetables, and maize.
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A Cross-Sectional Study of Pesticide Use and Knowledge of Smallholder Potato Farmers in Uganda

BioMed Research International is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in several areas of life sciences. The journal’s Editorial Board is divided into the 55 subject areas included within the journal’s scope.
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SpringerPlus | Abstract | Insect pests of sweetpotato in Uganda: farmers' perceptions of their importance and control practices

Insect pests are among the most important constraints limiting sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) production in Africa. However, there is inadequate information about farmers' knowledge, perceptions and practices in the management of key insect pests. This has hindered development of effective pest management approaches for smallholder farmers. A standard questionnaire was used to interview individual sweetpotato farmers (n = 192) about their perception and management practices regarding insect pests in six major sweetpotato producing districts of Uganda. The majority (93%) of farmers perceived insect pests to be a very serious problem. With the exception of Masindi and Wakiso districts where the sweetpotato butterfly (Acraea acerata) was the number one constraint, sweetpotato weevils (Cylas puncticollis and C. brunneus) were ranked as the most important insect pests. Insecticide use in sweetpotato fields was very low being highest (28-38% of households) in districts where A. acerata infestation is the biggest problem. On average, 65% and 87% of the farmers took no action to control A. acerata and Cylas spp., respectively. Farmers were more conversant with the presence of and damage by A. acerata than of Cylas spp. as they thought that Cylas spp. root damage was brought about by a prolonged dry season. Different levels of field resistance (ability of a variety to tolerate damage) of sweetpotato landraces to A. acerata (eight landraces) and Cylas spp. (six landraces) were reported by farmers in all the six districts. This perceived level of resistance to insect damage by landraces needs to be investigated. To improve farmers' capabilities for sweetpotato insect pest management, it is crucial to train them in the basic knowledge of insect pest biology and control.
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Potential of Cowpea Variety Mixtures to Increase Yield Stability in Subsistence Agriculture: Preliminary Results

Potential of Cowpea Variety Mixtures to Increase Yield Stability in Subsistence Agriculture: Preliminary Results | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
International Journal of Agronomy is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in all areas of agronomy.
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Farmers’ Perception of and Coping Strategies to Climate Change: Evidence From Six Agro-Ecological Zones of Uganda | Okonya | Journal of Agricultural Science

Farmers’ Perception of and Coping Strategies to Climate Change: Evidence From Six Agro-Ecological Zones of Uganda
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Indigenous knowledge of seasonal weather forecasting: A case study in six regions of Uganda

Indigenous knowledge of seasonal weather forecasting: A case study in six regions of Uganda | Journal Articles | Scoop.it
Indigenous knowledge of
seasonal weather forecasting could be useful
in decision making at village
level to best exploit the seasonal distribution of rainfall in order to increase or stabilize crop
yields. We examined existing
indigenous knowledge by interviewing 192 households in six regions of Uganda.
Twenty one distinctive indicators were mentioned by local communities for
forecasting the start of the dry season, but only few of these indicators were
more consistently and frequently used in the different districts. These
included the appearance of bush crickets (Ruspolia
baileyi Otte), winds blowing
from the east to the west, the appearance and movement
of migratory birds such as cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis Linnaeus), and calling by the Bateleur eagle (Terathopius ecaudatus Lesson). For prediction of the start of the rainy season, 22 indicators
were mentioned and these included winds blowing from the west to the east,
cuckoo birds (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae) start to call, and winged African
termite (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) swarms leave their nests. Predictors of
rain in the following days included presence of red clouds in the morning.
Together with the meteorological forecasts, traditional indicators could be very useful in rain forecasting and improving the timing of
agricultural activities.
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