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The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded

The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

When we think of great leaders, certain characteristics come to mind: They have confidence in their abilities and conviction in their beliefs. They “trust their gut,” “stay the course,” and “prove others wrong.” They aren’t “pushovers,” and they certainly don’t “flip-flop.” But this archetype is terribly outdated. Having spent three years studying many of the world’s most successful leaders for my new book, Persuadable, I’ve learned one surprising thing they have in common: a willingness to be persuaded.

Alan Mulally, the vaunted CEO who saved Ford Motor Company, is, for example, exceptionally skeptical of his own opinions. Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful hedge fund managers, insists that his team ruthlessly second-guess his thinking. Christine Lagarde, managing director of the IMF, seeks out information that might disprove her beliefs about the world and herself. In our increasingly complex world, these leaders have realized that the ability to consider emerging evidence and change their minds accordingly provides extraordinary advantages.


Via The Learning Factor
Jordan's insight:

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:05 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

MindShare HR's curator insight, March 10, 2016 2:24 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

Dané Davis's curator insight, March 10, 2016 5:48 PM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

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Think you're average? No, you're not

Think you're average? No, you're not | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

When Todd Rose was 21 years old, he was a high-school dropout struggling to support his wife and two small children on state benefits. He had done 10 minimum-wage jobs in two years.

"My favourite job was administering enemas to elderly people, because this meant I was allowed to drive around, rather than being stuck behind a desk or stamping aluminium on the factory floor," he says. "My father-in-law told me I was lazy, and I can't blame him. If this was my daughter, I'd be the same."

Today, aged 41, he's a Harvard professor with a string of accolades to his name, still happily married, with both kids at college. "So I didn't mess them up," he says with a smile - and one hopes his relationship with his in-laws is less fraught these days.


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The Twinkie Awards's curator insight, March 2, 2016 10:53 AM

How to stand out from the crowd.

u.grow's curator insight, March 4, 2016 8:44 AM

How to stand out from the crowd.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, March 9, 2016 7:31 PM

How to stand out from the crowd.

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In the game of office politics sometimes you must sacrifice a pawn to become queen

In the game of office politics sometimes you must sacrifice a pawn to become queen | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

Many years ago, I applied for a promotion I desperately wanted. At the time, I was the highest performer in the department and so everyone, including me, unwisely expected the big fancy job to be mine. It wasn't. Despite going for three interviews and enduring one of those excruciating psychometric tests, I was duly informed my application had been unsuccessful. What was most intriguing, however, was the reason the executive gave for rejecting me:

"James," she said, "you need to realise that sometimes it's not how well you perform a job that matters; it's how well you understand office politics." She then proceeded to write down the name of a book on the topic, which I was required to obediently read before applying again in the future.

 

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 7, 2016 4:35 PM

Didn't get that promotion? It may be in your interests to follow the example of the politically astute who build the necessary networks.

HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, February 7, 2016 8:09 PM

This is a clever article on strategies that must often be employed.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, March 10, 2016 3:34 AM

However harsh it may seem, the fact is that being the highest performer, doesn't guarantee you a coveted promotion! What matters in many cases is aptitude for office politics. To quote from the article, "sometimes it's not how well you perform a job that matters; it's how well you understand office politics." The unfortunate fact is that mollycodling and knowing when to switch sides and allegiance  are also important skill that can sometimes help you get that coveted promotion! Didn't get that promotion? It may be in your interests to follow the example of the politically astute who build the necessary networks.

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Ask The Experts: How Can I Tell My Micromanaging Boss To Back Off?

Ask The Experts: How Can I Tell My Micromanaging Boss To Back Off? | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

You're an adult. You don't need a babysitter. But telling your micromanaging boss to leave you alone and let you get your work done is never going to be an easy conversation.

 

If you see that you need to improve, take the action to change right away and let your boss know that you are taking your job seriously and you are looking to improve.

 

But if your self-check comes up clean--if you are confident that your work is up to par, then it’s time to have that talk with your boss. Here's how:


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 19, 2014 7:24 PM

A boss who hovers will drive most people crazy, but before you confront your overbearing manager, make sure you aren't part of the problem.

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3 Scientifically Proven Ways to Optimize Your Brain

3 Scientifically Proven Ways to Optimize Your Brain | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

The co-founders of Aditazz, which uses software to design and construct hospitals and other specialized buildings, were beyond frustrated. Zigmund Rubel, an architect, wanted to design buildings in one direction, either from the outside in or from the inside out, depending on the project. Deepak Aatresh, the CEO and an electrical and computer science engineer, was interested in simultaneous outside-in, inside-out design aided by computation.

It was one of many seemingly irresolvable conflicts. "We knew we were well-intentioned, very smart, accomplished people, but it was hard to make forward progress," Aatresh says.

This type of clash is familiar to neuroscience expert Ajit Singh, a partner at VC Artiman Ventures and member of the Aditazz board of directors; it has its roots in the brain. Innovation comes from com­bining disciplines, but people in different disciplines don't think the same way. The idea that the right brain hemisphere controls creativity and the left logic has been debunked. But research shows that the left brain is more responsible for language, whereas the right takes care of spatial processing and attention. "People don't select professions," Singh explains. "Professions select people."


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If your meetings are sputtering, rewiring the gray matter may help get employees reconnected.

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Godigitalcoup Tungsten's curator insight, March 7, 2016 5:49 AM

If your meetings are sputtering, rewiring the gray matter may help get employees reconnected.

emma's curator insight, March 7, 2016 11:59 AM

If your meetings are sputtering, rewiring the gray matter may help get employees reconnected.

Takudzwa Kunaka's curator insight, March 10, 2016 5:44 AM

If your meetings are sputtering, rewiring the gray matter may help get employees reconnected.

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A New Tool Helps Tackle Tricky Salary Negotiations

A New Tool Helps Tackle Tricky Salary Negotiations | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

Employees are usually in the dark about salaries other than their own. Even discussions with close friends and family members can get a little squirrely when paychecks are brought up. But it's tough to effectively negotiate either a raise or a new compensation package without really knowing what other people are earning. So it’s no surprise that Chris Bolte, cofounder/CEO of Paysa, says that the spark for the new platform that provides market salary data was literally to shed light on a shadowy aspect of the workplace.

"I’ve worked in small companies and big companies, interviewed thousands and hired hundreds of people," Bolte tells Fast Company. "It’s been fascinating [to see] how all over the map people are in terms of their compensation." The goal for Paysa was simple, he says. "We wanted to figure out how to help people better understand what their value is in the market, at least to enable them to have a more balanced, data-driven conversation with either a current or future employer."


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 28, 2016 8:52 PM

Big-data platform Paysa provides market insight to ease the often awkward, sometimes emotional, conversations about compensation.

u.grow's curator insight, March 4, 2016 8:45 AM

Big-data platform Paysa provides market insight to ease the often awkward, sometimes emotional, conversations about compensation.

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20 Things You Can Do for Your Career Before the New Year

20 Things You Can Do for Your Career Before the New Year | Jordan's likes | Scoop.it

It's finally December, and you've worked hard all year long. You wrote enough emails to fill a novel. You spent an average of seven hours a day on your computer. And, if you were working full-time, you probably spent 42 hours of your life battling traffic during your daily commute.

Whoa. If anyone deserves a chance to kick back and relax, it's you!

But as tempting as it may be to spend the rest of December curled up with a big mug of cocoa, a snuggly blanket, and a never-ending Netflix queue, you probably want to avoid hibernating all month long.

Regardless of whether your job status is employed or unemployed, you shouldn't underestimate the importance of getting a jump-start on your career in the year ahead in the final days of the month.

Use the next few weeks wisely so that you can finish 2015 feeling clear, focused, and organized when the year comes to an inevitable close. (If you're job hunting, this is an especially good time to get your ducks in a row because January is one of the best times to apply for a new job.)

Here are 20 career-boosting action steps to complete before the clock strikes midnight on New Year's Eve.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 20, 2015 4:45 PM

Use the next few weeks wisely so that you can finish 2015 feeling clear, focused, and organized when the year comes to an inevitable close.