John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream | John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Essential information on Shakespeare's sources, from Shakespeare Online.
John DerBedrosian's insight:

SOURCE: Part of the genius of Shakespeare's work was that he was able to use themes and characters from other plays and make them seem original. This is quite a common theme in poetry. For instance, the characters Theseus and Hippolyta  were taken from Geoffrey Chaucer's masterpiece 'Knight's Tale'. In Chaucer's play, they were Theseus, Duke of Athens and Ypolita, Queen of the Amazons and the wife of Theseus. Shakespeare appears to have only slightly reworded the part of the play where Chaucer introduces the classical Greek mythology and how Theseus won Hippolyta's hand in marriage.

 

Mabillard, Amanda. "Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare Online. N.p., 20 Aug. 2000. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

 

http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sources/mssources.html

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Elizabethan Women

Elizabethan Women | John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
John DerBedrosian's insight:

HISTORICAL ARTICLE: Women in the Elizabethan Era did not have as much power as men and were dependent on them for support. They did not have as many opportunities including being able to vote, job opportunities, and education. Due to this they eventually were married off to create alliances between families. Women were not supposed to speak out of turn. However, in Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Hermia speaks freely to Theseus about what she wants. This goes against the how women were supposed to act in the time period this was written in.

 

Alchin, Linda. "Elizabethan Women." Elizabethan Women. N.p., 16 May 2012. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

 

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-women.htm

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A Midsummer Night's Dream ( 1935 ) - YouTube

A Midsummer Night's Dream 1935 Directed By Max Reinhardt and William Dieterie Music: Felix Mendelssohn's music was used , but re-orchestrated by Erich Wolfga...
John DerBedrosian's insight:

VIDEO: This is a video clip from the 1935 movie version of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." This depicts the part of the play where Oberon tells Puck to lift the love spell from the lovers so "that this night may be no more than the vexation of a dream." He says this towards the end of the play and also implies that the new family will live a happy live. Oberon realizes that he should lift the spell because what he made Puck do was wrong and didn't go the way as expected. This version is a more faithful reproduction of Shakespeare's original text than the movie made in the 1990s. 

 

 

Reinhardt, Max, and William Dieterie. "A Midsummer Night's Dream ( 1935 )." YouTube. YouTube, 3 June 2010. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdhnCZvFTVU 

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Puck The Trickster

Puck The Trickster | John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
John DerBedrosian's insight:

LITERARY CRITICISM: Puck, in a Midsummer Night's Dream, can be portrayed as a trickster, although some may not think so.  Some writers "see the trickster as so universal a figure that all tricksters speak with essentially the same voice," while others "counsel that the tricksters belonging to individual societies are so culture-specific that no two of them articulate the same messages". This can be argued for both sides, but most people do believe Puck is a trickster. We see his actions throughout the entire play. For example, during his speech when he explains "And when she drinks, against her lips I bob, and on her wither'd dewlap pour the ale". He makes a women spill her drink as she is about to drink it. Puck also makes the women fall when he pretends to be a stool and slips from out under her. Puck again can be seen a trickster at the end of the play when he says "I am an honest Puck" and "Give me your hands, if we be friends, and Robin shall restore amends". He wants to lead everyone listening to the play into thinking to befriend him, but he will trick you as soon as he can. 

 

Evans, Robert C "'This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled': Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream" in Bloom, Harold, ed. The Trickster, Bloom's Literary Themes. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 8 Dec. 2014

 

<http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&WID=103230&SID=5&iPin=BLTTR010&SingleRecord=True>.&nbsp;

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Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream | John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Essential information on Shakespeare's sources, from Shakespeare Online.
John DerBedrosian's insight:

SOURCE: Part of the genius of Shakespeare's work was that he was able to use themes and characters from other plays and make them seem original. This is quite a common theme in poetry. For instance, the characters Theseus and Hippolyta  were taken from Geoffrey Chaucer's masterpiece 'Knight's Tale'. In Chaucer's play, they were Theseus, Duke of Athens and Ypolita, Queen of the Amazons and the wife of Theseus. Shakespeare appears to have only slightly reworded the part of the play where Chaucer introduces the classical Greek mythology and how Theseus won Hippolyta's hand in marriage.

 

Mabillard, Amanda. "Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare Online. N.p., 20 Aug. 2000. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

 

http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sources/mssources.html

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Shakespeare in Statistics

Shakespeare in Statistics | John, Kevin, And Domino's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
John DerBedrosian's insight:

PICTURE: William Shakespeare was without a doubt an incredible writer, and these statistics prove this point even more. Background of the time period and the writer  is important to the readers understanding of the book or play but as we see here, he has contributed to the English language that we speak today. Shakespeare made 3,000 new words which are still in the English language today. Some examples are hint, bump, and champion. He is also the second most quoted writer in the English language and A Midsummer Night's Dream was the shortest play he ever wrote. This photo proves how impressive his plays and works actually were. He wrote 37 plays and 154 works that people know of, more could still be out there or may not have been finished. 

 

"Shakespeare In Statistics: The Infographic." No Sweat Shakespeare RSS2. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Dec. 2014. 

 

http://www.nosweatshakespeare.com/blog/shakespeare-statistics/

 

 

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