Resolutely trivial
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Resolutely trivial
Don't look at that ... look at this!
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Sounds pretty graphic #10

Sounds pretty graphic  #10 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
Jonathan King's insight:

1957 cover for a late-'54 session. See  http://ploooomysunday.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-modernity-of-bob-brookmeyer.html

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On the face of it #7

On the face of it #7 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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This is the debut issue from the 1948 relaunch of the successful '30s humor magazine.  Elmer Zilch was the pseudonymous author of a great many so-called Tijuana bibles in the early 20 c.    http://www.salon.com/1997/08/19/tijuana/  

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The Rainbows - My Baby Baby Balla Balla (1966)

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Tremendously moronic. Catchy too! Bumped here from a debut position closer to the Founding, just 'cos. 

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It's easy when you know how #7

It's easy when you know how #7 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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Let's just eat here #7

Let's just eat here #7 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

Hereabouts it's not so much drive-in as drive-by....

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Dancing about architecture #7

Dancing about architecture #7 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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Pining for the fjords #18

Pining for the fjords #18 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

[Sheriff John was a daily companion during my first decade of TV-watching, along with such fabled L.A. kid-show hosts as Skipper Frank and Engineer Bill. Ah, the inclination to obey authority -- Earthly and otherwise -- that this guy in particular reinforced in so many of us!]

 

"Sheriff" John Rovick, the beloved Los Angeles children's TV show host whose gentle, fatherly persona made him a welcome guest in homes throughout the 1950s and '60s, has died at 93.

     Rovick was born Oct. 2, 1919, in Dayton, Ohio. After studying speech and dramatics at Michigan State University, he landed a job as a staff announcer on a Toledo radio station. But the job was short-lived.In 1942, Rovick joined the Army Air Forces and flew 50 missions as a radio gunner on a B-25.

     After the war, inspired by a colleague who had worked in Los Angeles, Rovick made an audition record and in 1949 drove west. He was a newly hired staff announcer at KTTV-TV (Channel 11) when the station first went on the air in 1949. In 1952, after KTTV acquired a batch of old cartoons and was searching for someone to host a daily cartoon show for children at 5:30 p.m., Rovick recalled years later, he "put on a khaki uniform and a badge and got a big white hat, sat at a desk and showed cartoons."

      "Cartoon Time" with Sheriff John became an immediate hit with young viewers, earning an Emmy Award in 1953 for outstanding children's program. KTTV by then had added a new show to its schedule at midday, "Sheriff John's Lunch Brigade," which stayed on the air until 1970."Come on now, laugh and be happy and the world will laugh with you," he'd sing in a smooth baritone, lip-synching as he entered the door of the sheriff's office set at the beginning of each show. The opening included leading his young viewers in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance."We talked a lot about safety, courtesy, manners and things like that," he told the Idaho Statesman in 2005. He'd also do occasional live remotes, taking viewers to see how bread was made, or how cars were assembled at a GM plant in Van Nuys. And, of course, he'd show cartoons (those with Crusader Rabbit were early favorites).

     One highlight of the show, whose primary target was 4- and 5-year-olds, was Sheriff John's reading of the names of dozens of viewers who were celebrating birthdays. Then he'd sing "The Birthday Cake Polka" — "Put another candle on my birthday cake. We're gonna bake a birthday cake ..." — as a large cake revolved on a lazy Susan. He also had lunch along with his viewers — after saying a brief nondenominational prayer.

     From the start, Rovick received encouraging mail from parents, who extended their gratitude for his lessons in manners, safety and patriotism.One father wrote a letter of thanks and told him how his young daughter learned to say the Pledge of Allegiance: "... with liberty and justice for all, and now to our first cartoon."

     After KTTV canceled "Lunch Brigade" in 1970,Rovick stayed on as a staff announcer until retiring in 1981, after 32 years at KTTV. He then moved to Idaho.

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Hey, I was at that show! #5

Hey, I was at that show!  #5 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

This blurb, from the June 3, 1967, issue of the KRLA Beat (a B&W tabloid), reprints the tentative lineup of the Monterey Pop Festival that was printed on the ticket order form, and  displays how fluid the lineup of performers was in the period running up to the festival.

     The Buffalo Springfield, said here to be in the Friday night, June 16, lineup, in fact played on Sunday night (a set famously missing Neil Young but including David Crosby), as did both the Grateful Dead and Jimi Hendrix;  Laura Nyro was moved to Saturday night.

     The Saturday afternoon lineup printed here remained stable until showtime, with the exception of Hugh Masekela, who played that evening (endlessly); it's notable that he's listed twice here, correctly in the Saturday evening lineup, incorrectly otherwise. Were festival managers actually intending to give him two sets? If so, I'm grateful they changed their minds -- his single set was probably the longest at the festival, and was (to me) the least interesting.

     The Saturday evening lineup here is accurate save for the Beach Boys, who did not perform at the festival after all. Ravi Shankar's solo set on Sunday -- an audacious booking that was a brilliant success -- was clearly planned in advance, and stuck with.

     The Sunday night lineup listed here, however, was radically changed by festival time: the Impressions didn't show at all (I hadn't realized until now that they were ever booked!), nor did Dionne Warwick (after her set was moved to Friday night, then canceled because of a booking conflict); and Johnny Rivers was moved up to Friday night.

     Final musing: Sunday night was ultimately a much more powerful and historic lineup than the one listed here -- but the Friday night lineup shown here, had it materialized, would have been superior, given the length of the Sunday night show (almost 5 hours) and the paucity of truly memorable sets (Hendrix and the Who) on a night that otherwise showcased The Band Without a Name (??), the Mamas and Papas, Scott McKenzie, a makeshift Buffalo Springfield, and a subpar Grateful Dead.

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Because you'll believe anything #3

Because you'll believe anything #3 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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Let's just eat here #8

Let's just eat here #8 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
Jonathan King's insight:

A recollection posted on Chowhound's Chicago board some years back :"It was one of the favorite meeting places of Chicago Politicions and also of the Chicago Hoods. The Chicago Bears used to come regularly and Mike Ditka was there every Monday when he was in town. "  

When the  longtime chef/owner died in 1986, his obiturary included this information about the restaurant's midlife:

"The Golden Ox, with its cuckoo clocks, Hummel figurines of Hansel and Gretel, and murals of scenes from the Ring of the Niebelungen in the main Siegfried dining room...was slated for demolition [in the 1960s]. .With help from a group of Chicago aldermen  ... the restaurant was spared. Aided by the gentrification of the Ranch Triangle neighborhood and other areas just west of Old Town, the Golden Ox began its comeback. ...[continuing] to offer the roast goose, sauerbraten, zwiebelfleish, potato pancakes, liver dumplings and other hearty German dishes for which it has been known for more than 60 years."

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What do women want? #7

What do women want? #7 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
Jonathan King's insight:

Space will be ours! Long live the first woman astronaut! (1963)

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Pining for the fjords #19

Pining for the fjords #19 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

 

Joe Kubert, born September 18 1926, died August 12 2012

 

     Yosaif Kubert was born in Yzeran, a shtetl in what was then Poland (now Ukraine). When he was two months old his family emigrated to the United States, and young Joe grew up in Brooklyn, where his father worked as a kosher butcher.

     He was fascinated by the cartoons in the newspapers his father brought home — Milt Coniff’s Flash Gordon and Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant – and almost as soon as he could hold a pencil he was drawing on his father’s butcher’s paper. [snip] At school he entertained his friends by drawing Tarzan and Flash Gordon.

     Aged 12, he took some of his drawings to the Manhattan studio that produced the Archie and Veronica comics, and by the age of 13 he was working in the production shop of the cartoonist Will Eisner. At 16 he was earning $5 a page drawing 'Volton, the Human Generator', for Catman Comics.

     He began his association with DC Comics with the 50-page 'Seven Soldiers of Victory,' and in 1945 for the first time he drew Hawkman, one of the superheroes with whom he became most closely associated.  He went on to become managing editor of St John Comics [but] in the late 1950s returned to DC Comics, serving as its director of publications from 1967 to 1976. His best-known character was Sergeant Rock, a prototype all-American hero 'whose platoon, Easy Company, always triumphs against overwhelming odds in the struggle against the Nazis. Kubert became a recognised leader in the field of “war comics”, notable for the gritty realism with which he depicted the horrors of conflict.'

http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100916011926/marvel_dc/images/thumb/f/ff/Sgt._Rock_Vol_1_304.jpg/305px-Sgt._Rock_Vol_1_304.jpg

      After a long career with DC Comics, Kubert explicitly explored Jewish history and identity in graphic form, notably in 'Yossel: April 19, 1943' (2003), a book he imagined how his own life might have been if his family had not left Poland in the 1920s. The book’s hero is a young Jewish artist who at first survives in the Warsaw ghetto by amusing Nazi soldiers with his drawings, but is unable to escape the fate decreed for his people by the Germans. With its graphic depictions of the starving and the dead, the book made no concessions to the sensibilities of young readers.

     In later decades, Kubert returned to the subject of war in his graphic novels, of which 'Fax From Sarajevo' (1996), the story of a fellow artist and friend who lived in Sarajevo for two years with his family as the city was being bombed and terrorised, won both the Eisner and Harvey Awards for Best Graphic Album in 1997. Among other works, 'Dong Xoai: 1965' drew on eyewitness accounts to present the story of the Battle of Dong Xoai in Vietnam.

 

The Telegraph (London) Nov. 8, 2012

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Do we need anything? #6

Do we need anything? #6 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

Damascus, Syria, 1965. [Charles Cushman photo]

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What do women want? #6

What do women want? #6 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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It's easy once you know how #6

It's easy once you know how #6 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it
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Crushes #6

Crushes #6 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

Lauren Graham, in a mercifully non-Gilmore moment.

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Siege mentality #8

Siege mentality #8 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

 

Modern Alamo Battle Over Plan to Display Letter

 

Millions of Texans have read the “Victory or Death” letter written at the Alamo more than 170 years ago. But only a small number of them have ever laid eyes on the original — a brief plea for reinforcements written by Lt. Col. William Barret Travis on Feb. 24, 1836, as he and his outnumbered men faced the Mexican Army.

     Whether it ever returns to the Alamo is now a hotly debated issue.

     The letter has become one of the most revered documents in Texas history, and one of its phrases — “Victory or Death,” which Colonel Travis underlined three times — has endured as an unofficial Texas slogan, turning up on flags and, occasionally, in the speeches of politicians, including one that Gov. Rick Perry gave last year as he campaigned for president.

     The document is kept in a secured storage area at the state archives building in Austin, off limits to the public. It has been publicly displayed only seven times since the early 1900s. Bill O’Neal, 70, the official state historian, has never seen the original.

     But a plan to display the letter for two weeks next year at the Alamo in San Antonio has posed a dilemma for its custodians, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. The state’s land commissioner, Jerry Patterson, has asked the archives commission for permission to transport the document from Austin to San Antonio and display it to the public beginning in late February as part of the 177th anniversary of the battle at the Alamo. The letter has never returned to the Alamo, and it was exhibited outside Austin just three times between 1936 and 2006.

     Mr. Patterson, whose General Land Office oversees the management of the Alamo, has proposed numerous steps to secure and protect the letter.

     It will be placed in a Mylar sleeve, mounted between sheets of antireflective plexiglass, placed in a crate and transported from Austin to San Antonio by a fine arts shipper with an escort of state troopers. It will be displayed in a custom-built case that will filter most ultraviolet light. Officers known as Alamo Rangers, private security guards and plainclothes off-duty police officers, will patrol or stand guard. The project will cost more than $100,000, the majority of which will be private donations.

     But after a meeting here Tuesday, the precautions failed to impress the board that oversees the archives commission, and the plan appeared to be in peril. Archives staff members recommended that the commissioners not approve the plan, citing concerns about the lack of a fire suppression system in the Alamo as well as Mr. Patterson’s desire to transport the document during the day with as much fanfare and news coverage as possible.

     “We feel that the risks of loaning the document cannot be mitigated 100 percent, and we advise against the loan,” the director of the archives agency, Peggy D. Rudd, told the seven commissioners.

     Commissioners appeared concerned with the potential for mishap, theft or vandalism, and they asked two General Land Office representatives if the letter at the Alamo could be protected from a tornado, a flood or even a weapon.“Is the case bulletproof?” one commissioner, Martha Doty Freeman, asked. (It will not be, though it will be shatterproof).

     A motion to approve the plan failed, but then the commissioners voted to meet again within three weeks, after reviewing an updated and more detailed plan. A potential deal breaker is the issue of daytime or nighttime transport — archives officials prefer transporting it at night without any publicity, citing security reasons, while Mr. Patterson wants it done in daylight.

     “We anticipate making this a news item to help make people aware of Texas history,” Mr. Patterson said. “If you lock something up forever and it’s never seen by the citizenry, it has little value. This dramatic arrival at the Alamo, not being snuck back over there under cover of darkness, is what the project is about.”

 

New York Times, Oct. 3, 2012

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Pining for the fjords #17

Pining for the fjords #17 | Resolutely trivial | Scoop.it

Lance LeGault (1935-2012), at left in photo (with P.J. Proby), played Iago in the Othello-inspired musical "Catch My Soul," which Jack Good, the legendary TV pop music producer, mounted in London in 1970, with a primarily American cast. (Proby played Cassio, soulstress P.P. Arnold was Bianca, and Good himself essayed the role of Otello.) I caught that show at the Prince of Wales in September 1970, only a day or two after arriving in the U.K. to begin my year abroad.

     LeGault meant nothing to me, and I had never heard of P.P. Arnold (and there's a whole other story there...), but I was ecstatic to see Proby and Good, whom I'd watched closely when "Shindig!" was on the air in the U.S. a few years earlier. The thing I remember most about that evening -- other than that, as we  rushed to the theater on the tube, I glimpsed a headline saying that Jimi Hendrix had just died (about a mile from our London lodgings) -- was when a cranky old man who clearly regarded the proceedings as rubbish rose from the audience, strode to the stage, shouted something pithy but incomprehensible, and tossed his program on the stage before turning to exit. P.J. Proby broke character long enough to kick the program back at him from the lip of the stage.

     Anyway, Lance Legault died: http://westernboothill.blogspot.com/2012/09/rip-lance-legault.html

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