Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio
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Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio
Portfolio for ACOM 375
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Facebook: Community Building

Facebook: Community Building | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

This blog post is about Facebook and how it offers its users opportunities to build a community. If a community includes people who share similar characteristics and attempts to eliminate distance between others, then Facebook does a good job in doing so. Within the online community, options such as looking for groups and people who have similar interests are very common and easy to use. The simple “Like” button has created a whole new world in following people and showing support to just about anything from supporting relief programs and charities to popular video games. Liking something causes a notification to pop up for each other comment or post on that subject, which reminds the user to go back. This reinforces those who shared the “like” link and continues the bond between the users. Groups are also formed on Facebook, generating a community within a community. In ACOM 375, our Professor has formed a group for the students to join to help set up possible discussion and work posts. But the level of privacy for Facebook is exclusive, so community building is sometimes limited but it also forms a stronger, and closely knitted group. Facebook is a social networking website that gives the users the power to establish work-related framework, romantic relationship, connect people who share similar interests, and establish social capital.

 

As Coleman has noted within Ellison, Steinfeld & Campe’s article, social capital is reinforced by Facebook because the users accumulate relationships online, thus, increasing the commitment to a community. The establishment of social capital helps encourage people to spread out their own community in different fashions. Getting to know people who have related interests in music, books, television shows, movies, and more, and befriending them “…allows a person to draw on resources from other members of the networks to which he or she belongs” (Paxton, 1999) Also in the reading, Ellison, Steinfeld & Campe mention how technology, like the internet, brings people together, which in a way, forms its own community. Facebook is just a tool within the cyber world that focuses on community building.

 

Resources:

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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Twitter: Informal CMC

Twitter is an asynchronous online communication tool which does not have an arranged agenda but is 100% interactive. People are able to follow others and keep tabs on their posts, and partake in a conventional conversation between tweets. The speech language itself is informal because the communication includes many people commenting at once, and the messages are saved so people do not have to respond right away. But the language people use however, may vary depending on the situation of the posts and can be formal or informal. Such as the posts on Occupy Wall Street where the tweets are punctual and sometimes rather elaborate making it more formal than a random tweet that occurred in a teenager’s life at school.

 

Informal communication, as Fish eh Al.’s (1990) chart puts it, is unscheduled, random participants, unarranged agenda, interactive, rich content, informal language, and speech register. “Tweeting”, as we call the posts people make on Twitter, is an interesting concept. The website itself acts as a base, a territorial ground for people to engage in randomly by “retweeting” and commenting on either other participants post or on the user’s status themselves. Similar to instant messaging, the delay in messages being sent and received but revolve around many people and not just one person. Anyone who is following someone will notice the same status update as everyone else who follows the same person, and the timing of the posts are also sporadic making the communication unscheduled and random.

 

Resources:

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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CMC Language with Blackboard

CMC Language with Blackboard | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

Many colleges use Blackboard Learning System for classes, so students can interact with other students within the same class as well as the teacher. There are discussion boards for public uses, internal messages for private messaging, and even a chat room for instant messaging. Each tool offered in Blackboard for communicating has their own form of language befitting the situation. For example, when students are talking to each other through blogs, typically, the type of communication is informal and the use of punctuation is not essential. But when it comes to private messaging between students and professors, the language is more formal and the sentences written are properly composed. Blackboard is a good model for CMC Language with multi-directional communication and open anonymity.

 

“Computer-mediated discourse is the communication produced when human beings interact with one another by transmitting messages via networked computers.” (Herring) The reading mentions that CMC is mostly text-based, and written in forms of e-mails, group discussions, real-time chats, and virtual role-playing games where messages are sent by one person to another at a different location. In “real-time” modes, such as IM’ing and group chats, no matter how fast we are able to type, it is still slower than talking. This type of asynchronous communicating, where there is a delay in messages sent and received, also has its benefits where the communication is more private and that the communication can be simultaneously spread out between multiple people. The linguistic structure of CMC language is sometimes viewed as “fractured” and “less correct” but this is actually done on purpose to economize typing effort or just to demonstrate oneself expressively. CMC language can also be anonymous in certain situations which affect the credibility of information sent over the internet in blogs, group discussions, etc. consequently influencing “real life” identity.

 

Resources:

Herring, S. (CMD) (2001) Computer-Mediated Discourse. Handbook of Discourse Analysis, edited by Deborah Tannen, Deborah Schiffrin, and Heidi Hamilton. Oxford: Blackwell. Available at: http://www.let.rug.nl/redeker/herring.pdf

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LinkedIn: Networking

LinkedIn: Networking | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

LinkedIn has become an increasingly popular social network website that allows people to build their own community, identity, and most importantly, their network among others in the professional field. Users of LinkedIn set up a profile which may include their name, age, gender, e-mail address and other information for others to see, and get a general idea of who you are. The more useful function of LinkedIn is being able to upload your own resumé and have it sent out to target employers. By doing so, the accessibility of your account is expanded to a large crowd, and it creates openings to establish your credibility with professionals. LinkedIn also allows the user, the same way other social networking sites work, to add people as “friends”, thus creating a community of people who could possibly help out in the job search. Establishing friendships with those within the same line of work can help to refer each other to companies and employers which is very beneficial since connections are key to finding jobs.

 

If social networking sites are defined by Boyd and Ellison as web-based services that allow individuals to construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system, then the nature and nomenclature of these connections may vary from site to site. (Boyd and Ellison, 2007) LinkedIn provides networking in both the establishment of friends and work, but also does so in a well-organized manner. The types of jobs that someone can look into are filtered so that it meets the requirements of the user, which makes it very useful for someone specialized in one area to seek attention from employers who are looking for a specific skill in an employee. LinkedIn also fulfills the condition Boyd and Ellison make about social networking sites by instituting a field of connections between people who share similar interests in the work force, in the end, forming stronger ties in the network.

 

Resources:

Boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). "Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11.

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Mode of CMC: Web 2.0 with Blogger

Mode of CMC: Web 2.0 with Blogger | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

In “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits“, the article directly states that modes of communication online including blogs, wikis, and social networking sites are considered Web 2.0. This is due to the two-way communication in an online, public place where people are able to comment and hold conversations with others. Blogger, which is supported by Google, falls under this Web 2.0 category. As the name implies, it is comprised of blog posts made by various people from across the globe. It requires the user to make an account and gives the option of setting up a profile. This allows identity development, and in a way, forms community building because people will then be able to identify the author of a post who could possibly share similar interests. Users who comment and post are also able to make posts anonymously, and by doing so, there is less obligation in being formal. This allows people to speak more freely about how they feel because there won’t be any repercussion in their actions, in terms of hurting ones image and identity. The content of information itself included can be informal depending on the topic of the blog, as long as it does not contain any offensive material.

 

Resources:

Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

 

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Facebook: Identity Development

Facebook: Identity Development | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

With Facebook, identity development becomes the whole point of making a profile. Why is it called a profile? Because, you are given the chance to express who you are from your own point of view, in a sense, putting the best foot forward, and that is what other’s view you as. There are even sections under the profile page called “About Me”, “Interests”, “Favorite Books” and so on, where the user can go on about how cool of a person they are, what they enjoy doing, or movies they like to watch, without having to explain it to each and every individual. And the best part about Facebook and its mobility, is that the message can be seen and reached by everyone. Facebook also has a feature with adding friends, as it will say that you have X number of friends in common with that person, which helps ease the mind because then you know that that person is real since your friend has already added them. People with Facebook accounts also face problems with keeping the same identity in the case where a college student tries to look professional for employers, only to find out that their friends have tagged them in an embarrassing photo. Aside from that, Facebook does a good job in letting people create their own identity online.

 

The identity we establish ourselves online is dependent on many factors, some of which we cannot control. But overall, self-presentation and self-disclosure online is what gives off the impression to other people on the internet. Computer mediated communication is also, in nature, asynchronous and “online self-presentation is more malleable and subject to censorship than face-to-face self-presentation” (Walther, 1996) which then poses a problem about false identities. Because a profile is online and we do not see who is on the other side of the computer screen, without voice recognition or a webcam we cannot truly determine who the other person is. Although Facebook is a bit safer, there have been times when fake accounts have been made to seem realistic, and people still need to be aware with whom they are befriending online. Thus credibility is important over the internet and matching information with what other people perceive is important when establishing credibility. Ellison, Heino, & Gibbs point out that pictures are a good way to determine the credibility of oneself because not only does it give a visual representation, but the details about that person also should match the photo as well. If someone in their description box says that he or she is very athletic, but the photo clearly shows that they aren’t, then not only has the self-impression been disproven, their credibility is also shattered.

 

Resources:

Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2.http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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Twitter: Filtering and Curating

Twitter: Filtering and Curating | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

One of the first few things people notice when they start using Twitter, are these little tags within people’s posts and by clicking on them, it leads the user to another set of conversations with that same topic. This is called a “hashtag”, almost an essential feature of Twitter, which enables people to redirect their current post with past, related “tweets” of others. An example for such a “hashtag” is “#UACMC”, and by including those set of letters in my “tweet”, it creates a link that will bring the viewer to a whole different set of posts associated with computer mediated communication. A benefit of these tags include filtering out unnecessary information unrelated to the tag, which then increases the efficiency of looking up specific information. “Following” someone or an event is another feature of Twitter which helps filtering in a different fashion. When you follow someone, their posts will show up on your news feed, and by following something like Occupy Wall Street, the information news feed will show up on your home page. This allows people to touch base with people and events that they find interesting or hold value to even further because it does not require the user, him or herself, to constantly keep an eye out on the person since it automatically updates itself. Filtering and curating makes things more relevant and applicable for users on Twitter. Tags have been very useful for people on Twitter because it locates bits of information particular to what is being searched, and “following” people further augments the process. Filtering helps to facilitate exploring in a cleaner manner due to the elimination of things unrelated, and this is important in today’s day and age of technology when speed and accuracy means everything.

 

Resources:

Masullo-Chen, G. (2011) How to use twitter hashtag. Save the media blog. Available at http://savethemedia.com/2011/03/04/howtousetwitterhashtag/

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Formal CMC with Blackboard

Formal CMC with Blackboard | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

In Figure 2. Formal and informal dimensions of CMC of Hrastinski’s research and practice, the criteria for formal communication consists of scheduled, one-way, preset agenda, one-way, mandatory, authority-organized, content-focus, formal language, and high cost. One tool that is leaning more towards the formal side of computer mediated communication is Blackboard. This system for colleges fits the condition of a Formal CMC tool, where the professor is in control of the agenda presented for a class. There may be work posted that is required from the students which is organized by the professor, therefore making the information supplied content-focused with a high level of formality. Blackboard Learning System is good for interaction between students-to-students and students-to-teachers with the chat room, blogs, and e-mails available.

 

The diagrams in Hrastinski’s article show that online discussions by discussion board are on the formal side of the spectrum. Formality is determined by the task and how the medium is used, and our example here is Blackboard and the discussion board. In some cases, the discussion board can include random participants and no real set agenda, but when used differently, the discussion board can turn into a one-way, content-focused, with formal language. Used in my Computer Mediated Communication course, students are asked to read the agenda and follow the steps provided on BLS, and respond accordingly in a proper manner.

 

Resources:

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Mode of CMC: Web 3.0 with Youtube

Youtube is probably a website everyone has heard of, and it is one the most popular places for people to watch videos. Whether the video is funny or sad, professional or homemade, there is always something out there for people to watch and entertain. Youtube is an example of Web 3.0 because of the content that it presents to the public. Aside from just watching videos, people who make their own account and set up a profile are able to post comments on other videos, rate them, and even upload their own. But this website is not just limited to the common public, professionals like those dealing with the music industry or movies also utilize Youtube to help broadcast and advertise their products. Youtube promotes interaction between others with the use of commenting, and because the anonymity is enclosed, people are free to say whatever they please, both positive and negative. This does create some tension between people because there are racist remarks and “trolling” going around, which is the negative side effect of hidden identity but Youtube can only do so much to control it.

 

In our group project for ACOM 375, we made a Youtube video ourselves simply by recording a video on a group members camera, and uploaded it onto Youtube. The process itself was simple and free, which makes it easy for almost any age group to accomplish. We used the video to broadcast our project to get more people involved with LinkedIn, and to help spread the awareness of such a useful website.

 

Youtube can also be viewed on cellular devices, which makes it a very mobile website. Essentially, Youtube can be on the go as long as there is internet connection. In the article of “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits”, Web 3.0 includes mobile websites, text campaigns, and smartphone applications, with Youtube being the mobile website. The mobility of this website also stretches out to other countries, and people in American can watch videos from different countries and vice versa. This expands the target audience to an even larger degree where the location of the viewer is not limited.

 

Resources:

Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Mode of CMC: Web 1.0 with a webpage

Mode of CMC: Web 1.0 with a webpage | Jeff Yang's CMC Portfolio | Scoop.it

Using C4LPT in our communications class to find tools of CMC was our primary source of interest because it contained a plethora of online tools. The simple design of a webpage like this is easy to navigate which is the result of a Web 1.0 mode of computer mediated communication. The one-way communication style disables any person-to-person interaction, and just contains information that we, as a class, were looking for.

 

One-way communication is the basis of Web 1.0, where information is fed to the viewer and there isn’t much else to it. There is no room for commenting, chat rooms, or other modes of communicating. This dynamic web page will have information changing on the site itself every once in a while for updates, but does not allow user generated content. Everything is controlled by a moderator or administrators of the site so that viewers cannot just barge in and start changing things. With no profiles or accounts needed, viewers are hidden and there is no interaction between each other. C4LPT does include a search option for finding desired topics quicker and an e-mail address for contacting Jane Hart- the creator- but as Web 1.0, communication still remains one-way on the website itself.

 

Resources:

Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

 

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