JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
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JavaScript for Line of Business Applications
Keeping track of current JavaScript Frameworks that help design your clientside Business Logic Layers.
Curated by Jan Hesse
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MetaES introduction

MetaES introduction | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

MetaES is a metacircular interpreter written in JavaScript at EcmaScript 5.1 standard, so it can run on pretty any environment that supports ES5, for example modern browsers (both with mobile), nodejs, rhino, nashorn and other ECMAScript interpreters. 
For parsing JavaScript it uses esprima.

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LispyScript - A javascript With Lispy Syntax And Macros!

An inherent problem with Javascript is that it has no macro support, unlike other Lisp like languages. That's because macros manipulate the syntax tree while compiling. And this is next to impossible in a language like Javascript.

In LispyScript we write Javascript in a tree structure. If you know Javascript and a Lisp like language, then using LispyScript will be a breeze. Even if you don't know a Lispy Language, all you need to learn is to write code in a tree structure.

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JavaScript + Other Languages

JavaScript + Other Languages | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

JAVASCRIPT IS GREAT:

Runs in all browsers

Familiar syntax

Dynamic typing

OTHER LANGUAGES ARE GREAT TOO:

Existing code

Developer tools

Static typing

MIXING LANGUAGES:

When useful, gives you the best parts of multiple languages

GOING THROUGH JAVASCRIPT:

Might seem like an odd solution

But replacing JavaScript with anything else would slow down the web

Adding another virtual machine (VM) alongside JavaScript is complicated (cross-VM GC, etc.)

Consensus to standardize any such change would be very hard

 

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JavaScript is Web Assembly Language and that's OK.

JavaScript is Web Assembly Language and that's OK. | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

It's initially not clear that JavaScript is a good assembly language as it's a high-level programming language that is itself interpreted, then JIT-ted, then turned into machine instructions. Phrased differently, JavaScript floats pretty high in the stack. Certainly every processor has its own assembler and they are very specific, but the browser's JavaScript VM is what runs the "new machine code." There's only one processor architecture. The Web. (again, analogy!)

JavaScript remains a popular transpilation/compilation target. From Google's GWT to Clojure to TypeScript to CoffeeScript, it all stops at JavaScript because JavaScript is the ubiquitous virtual machine that we already have installed on our machines.

Jan Hesse's insight:

Post from Scott Hanselmann

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programmingarena's curator insight, May 29, 2013 3:45 AM

www.programmingarena.com

 - IT TUTORIALS online forums & blog provides you online training, tutorials, and free pdf ebooks download of lessons on various computer programs. http://www.programmingarena.com

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Cheerp, the C++ compiler for the Web

Cheerp, the C++ compiler for the Web | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

A seamless C++ programming experience for the Web.

Use cheerp to write your Web applications in fully type-safe C++ code, make use of uncountable existing libraries, leverage your existing knowledge, reuse your code, improve your productivity.

Cheerp generates optimized JavaScript code that is compatible with any browser, on any platform. Let the compiler spot errors for you at compile time, instead of hunting them at run-time.


Port existing applications or write new ones, all in C++

Cheerp is based on the proven and robust LLVM stack and fully compatible with almost all C and C++11 code. If you want to take advantage of transparent RPC support, you just need to add some tags to tell cheerp if you want your methods compiled for the server or for the client. Everything else (including client to server remote procedure calls, serialization and deserialization, etc.) will work automagically!

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JavaScript and Friends: CoffeeScript, Dart and TypeScript

JavaScript and Friends: CoffeeScript, Dart and TypeScript | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

This article assumes that the reader has a good knowledge of JavaScript and has done at least some development in it, but if this is not about you, you can just first refer to one of the beginner’s JavaScript books like Eloquent JavaScript.

JavaScript is an amazing, often underappreciated and misunderstood language. It has some really powerful concepts like functions as first-class citizens (see, for example, JavaScript: The World’s Most Misunderstood Programming Language), flexible prototypal inheritance and is a powerful generic programming language that can be used not only in browsers.

Despite all its power and flexibility the language has some well-known design shortcomings such as global variables, cumbersome emulation of lexical scoping, non-intuitive implicit conversions, etc. In fact, there are parts of the language that you better avoid using at all, as it is advised in JavaScript: The Good Parts. Let us also note that from the beginning JavaScript was not specifically designed for developing applications with large code bases and many developers involved.

Contents:
* Why JavaScript Isn’t Enough?
* Example JavaScript Program: Dijkstra’s Algorithm
* CoffeeScript
* TypeScript
* Dart
* Web Application Development
* ECMAScript 6
* Conclusions

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Sibilant: Javascript with a lisp

Sibilant: Javascript with a lisp | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

Sibilant is a lisp-family language that compiles to readable and idiomatic JavaScript. Sibilant is built on a simple macro system that gives you compile-time control over the output JavaScript as well as providing tools to smooth over some of JavaScript's historical idiosynchracies.

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Compiling to JavaScript: What, Why, and How? - Build New Games

Compiling to JavaScript: What, Why, and How? - Build New Games | JavaScript for Line of Business Applications | Scoop.it

A very comprehensive overview of what you can do to make JavaScript programming much more professional - i.e. choose language of your choice and crosscompile it

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