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Rural Australians struggling to put food on the table, Foodbank Hunger Report finds - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Rural Australians struggling to put food on the table, Foodbank Hunger Report finds - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Geography resources | Scoop.it

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Play Farming Games Online

Play Farming Games Online | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Now is your chance to virtually farm! Play the Journey 2050 farming game online now.
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Urban agriculture is the key to a sustainable future | Food | Al Jazeera

Urban agriculture is the key to a sustainable future | Food | Al Jazeera | Geography resources | Scoop.it
We can beat climate change by growing food in small urban environments, like rooftops, balconies and even walls.
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Using Star Wars to Teach Biomes and Ecosystems Play Like a Pirate

Using Star Wars to Teach Biomes and Ecosystems Play Like a Pirate | Geography resources | Scoop.it
A big part of "Playing Like a Pirate" is using pop culture to teach. Whether it's music, video games, movies or television, you'll get kids on board if you indulge in pop culture from time to time. Or if you're me, all the time. One of the many things I love about the Star Wars movies is the planets. With few exceptions, each world in that far away galaxy is a single biome. It's simplistic, but you've gotta admit, if you're going to be going from planet to planet in a movie, it's nice to be able to look out the window and see snow, sand, or forest and know where you are.

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12 Websites on Biomes

12 Websites on Biomes | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Here’s a great list I use with my fourth graders, but many can be adapted for other grades: Adventure Island Antarctica Environ—find the animals Biomes of the World Breathing earth–the enviro…
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Who is fighting whom in Syria?

"There has been an intense wave of Russian air strikes in two areas of Syria, activists say. Moscow says it is targeting jihadist groups like Islamic State in co-ordination with Syria's government. But NATO is worried some of the attacks are hitting rebel groups opposed to President Bashar al-Assad - some of whom are backed by the West. So just who is fighting whom in Syria?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2015 8:02 PM

Following the old adage, "an enemy of an enemy is a friend" can make for a very complicated geopolitical situation in a hurry.  This video is a nice overview of the complexity without being complicated.   


TagsSyria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Bee Scared | 60 Minutes | 9Jumpin

Bee Scared | 60 Minutes | 9Jumpin | Geography resources | Scoop.it
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Honey bee scientists in Australia fight for the bees

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Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:39 PM

This article shows how crops were entirely different 8,000 years ago. It shows how much we have breeded and affected the natural crops. With the example of peaches, watermelons, and corn, the article shows how the natural crop didn't taste as good and was a lot smaller. The natural peach had 64% edible food; whereas the 2014 peach had 90% edible food. The pictures comparing the natural and artificial crops also illustrated how the many varieties of that specific crop had grown and where the crop is found has grown. Lastly, the diagrams compares the water and sugar percentages. This article paints a good picture as to how much mankind has affected our land and agriculture. Also, how much our crops have changed due to selective breeding.

 

The article gives a good illustration of topics in Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use. The article shows how selective breeding has affected many crops. It gives a good view as to how selective breeding and agriculture has been affected and changed in the Neolithic Agriculture Revolution. The article explains what what life was like and how it changed in the Neolithic times. This article is really interesting in showing how crops were changed.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:41 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Paul Keating's Redfern address - 80 Days That Changed Our Lives - ABC Archives

Paul Keating's Redfern address - 80 Days That Changed Our Lives - ABC Archives | Geography resources | Scoop.it
'We took the traditional lands and smashed the traditional way of life.' Paul Keating's Redfern speech was the first time a Prime Minister acknowledged the impact of European settlement on Indigenous Australians.
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Ecological footprint: Do we fit on our planet? - YouTube

Learn about sustainability for free with short animation videos! Find all sustainability videos and join the community on http://sustainabilityillustrated.co...
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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Geography resources | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Seaweed Farming: A Gateway to Conservation and Empowerment –

Seaweed Farming: A Gateway to Conservation and Empowerment – | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Seaweed farming is often viewed as the pinnacle of sustainable aquaculture - but ensuring sustainability is incredibly complex.
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Top Crop

Top Crop | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Maximize your yield while keeping your farm sustainable in this crop-growing game.
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12 foods that might soon be extinct

12 foods that might soon be extinct | Geography resources | Scoop.it
Climate change poses a severe threat to some of the foods we know and love - here are some of the most at risk.

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Jess Goris's curator insight, February 28, 2:45 PM
- Right off the bat, before the article even starts, it gives you 3 facts;
1. Climate change is negatively affecting the world's food supply in a variety of ways.
2. Fluctuating temperatures and unstable weather patterns make it more difficult for different crops to thrive.
3. Avocados, maple syrup, and strawberries are among foods that could go extinct soon.
I just watched a documentary called "Cowspiracy" and learnt that climate change is happening because of animal agriculture. Animal agriculture is stealing our water, our land...our planet. Rainforests, also known as the earths lungs, are being teared down daily. Everyone just assumes climate change, droughts, fires, ocean dead zones are caused by pollution, gas emissions, etc. but no one (INCLUDING COMPANIES WHO CLAIM THEY WANT TO SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT) will admit the real issue at hand. Now, our foods are going extinct.
- The first fruit predicted to go extinct is avocados. "Avocados require 9 gallons of water per ounce to grow. That's 72 gallons of water per fruit." Another thing that I learnt from "Cowspiracy" was 1 single hamburger takes 660 gallons of water to produce. Animal agriculture alone uses 32 trillion gallons of water per year while the United States of America uses 100 billion gallons per year. There's your answer right there, animal agriculture is robbing us of what we as humans need!
- Next, this article mentions Mexico's rapid deforestation of pine forests that produce the avocados. 45% of our earth is designated towards "farm land" to raise cattle as well as grow crops to feed those cattle. People are not thinking before acting, the consequences might not be at the exact time of your action, but it's a really big issue that we are all facing today; people thinking of no one but themselves and MONEY.
- When people hear 'emissions', they often think cars, oil plants, gas, etc. I now think of animals; cows, pigs, fish, etc. There has been an 80% increase of agricultural emissions. 
- "Estimates that production of wheat, maize, and rice - collectively the most vital crops for humans around the world - are in danger." WHAT.
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Mission: Biomes

Mission: Biomes | Geography resources | Scoop.it
climate change, global climate change, global warming, natural hazards, Earth, environment, remote sensing, atmosphere, land processes, oceans, volcanoes, land cover, Earth science data, NASA, environmental processes, Blue Marble, global maps
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Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences

Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences | Geography resources | Scoop.it

"Globalisation was supposed to tear down barriers, but security fears and a widespread refusal to help migrants and refugees have fuelled a new spate of wall-building across the world, even if experts doubt their long-term effectiveness. When the Berlin Wall was torn down a quarter-century ago, there were 16 border fences around the world. Today, there are 65 either completed or under construction, according to Quebec University expert Elisabeth Vallet."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 12:11 PM

This is an intriguing opinion piece that would be good fodder for a class discussion on political geography or the current events/refugee crisis. 


Tags: borders, political.

Nflfootball Live's curator insight, September 19, 2015 8:04 AM

https://www.reddit.com/3ljqnq/

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 3:53 PM

unit 2 or 4

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The lake at the end of the world - Caroline Macdonald

The lake at the end of the world - Caroline Macdonald | Geography resources | Scoop.it
The end of the world is not a place but a time not too far in the future, a premise that is not as farfetched today as it would have seemed a decade ago. The world is practically dead, because its ...
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Endonym Map: World Map of Country Names in Their Local Languages

Endonym Map: World Map of Country Names in Their Local Languages | Geography resources | Scoop.it
An endonym is the name for a place, site or location in the language of the people who live there. This map depicts endonyms of the countries of the world in their official or national languages.
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Lingiari's legacy: from little things big things grow

Lingiari's legacy: from little things big things grow | Geography resources | Scoop.it
It's amazing what we can learn from this tale of the Gurindji, from all Aboriginal people and from the legacy of one of our true national heroes, to both black and white, Vincent Lingiari.
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Human-Rights-Time-Line-human-rights-884732_1920_1291.jpg (1920x1291 pixels)

Human-Rights-Time-Line-human-rights-884732_1920_1291.jpg (1920x1291 pixels) | Geography resources | Scoop.it
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