Japanese Internment during WWII
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Japanese Internment during WWII
The battle of Civil Liberties vs. National Security will always be a controversial topic. The inprisonment of Japanese Americans during WWII is a prime example of this debate, a debate that still rages on today.
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USS SHAW exploding during the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor, T.H. | DocsTeach: Documents

USS SHAW exploding during the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor, T.H. | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

This is a picture of the USS Shaw exploding during the Pearl Harbor attacks on Decemer 7, 1941. The Japanese attack on the U.S. naval base on Oahu began at 7:53 a.m.; the second wave came at 8:55 A.M. In less than 2 hours, the United States suffered 3,435 casualties and saw 188 planes, 8 battleships, 3 light cruisers, and 4 other vessels lost or severely damaged, including the USS Shaw seen exploding here. The Japanese lost fewer than 100 personnel, 29 planes, and 5 midget submarines.

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Executive Order 9066 dated February 19, 1942, in which President Franklin D. Roosevelt Authorizes the Secretary of War to Prescribe Military Areas | DocsTeach: Documents

Executive Order 9066 dated February 19, 1942, in which President Franklin D. Roosevelt Authorizes the Secretary of War to Prescribe Military Areas | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 authorizing military commanders to exclude civilians from military areas. Although the language of the order did not specify any ethnic group, Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt of the Western Defense Command proceeded to announce curfews that included only Japanese Americans. Next, he encouraged voluntary evacuation by Japanese Americans from a limited number of areas; about 7 percent of the total Japanese American population in these areas complied. On March 29, 1942, under the authority of the executive order, DeWitt issued Public Proclamation No. 4, which began the controlled, involuntary evacuation and detention of West Coast residents of Japanese American ancestry on a 48-hour notice. Only a few days prior to the proclamation, on March 21, Congress had passed Public Law 503, which made violation of Executive Order 9066 a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a $5,000 fine. From the end of March to August, approximately 112,000 persons left their homes for civil control stations, proceeded to assembly centers, then were transported to relocation centers across the interior of the country. Nearly 70,000 of the evacuees were American citizens. There were no charges of disloyalty against any of these citizens, nor was there any vehicle by which they could appeal their loss of property and personal liberty.

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San Francisco, California. Evacuees of Japanese descent among a contingent of 664. | DocsTeach: Documents

San Francisco, California. Evacuees of Japanese descent among a contingent of 664. | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this photograph we can see some of the first Japanese American evacuees leaving their homes in San Francisco, California, to one of the seven relocation camps. They would stay in these relocation camps for the remainder of the war.

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Letter from Rocky Shimpo editor James Omura to former Heart Mountain internee Kiyoshi Okamoto, who had recently been moved to the internment camp at Tule Lake, California | DocsTeach: Documents

Letter from Rocky Shimpo editor James Omura to former Heart Mountain internee Kiyoshi Okamoto, who had recently been moved to the internment camp at Tule Lake, California | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this letter, James Omura touches on his thoughts as to the constitutionality of the federal government determining one's loyalty, or disloyalty. This would be an important view point as far as arguing against the attack of civil liberties.

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Photograph of Evacuees at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California | DocsTeach: Documents

Photograph of Evacuees at the Tule Lake Relocation Center in California | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

This photograph is of a bride and groom to be. This photo shows that even though the Japanese Americans were imprisoned, their normal every dy activities could still be accomplished. This couple was wed inside the Tule Lake Relocation Center, outside Newell, California

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Interview of Dillon S. Meyer on the Relocation of Japanese - Americans | DocsTeach: Documents

Interview of Dillon S. Meyer on the Relocation of Japanese - Americans | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this audio recording of an interview with Dillon S. Meyer, the Director of the War Relocation Authority, he explains the reasoning for the inprisonment of the Japanese Americans, and what their lives were like inside the camps. 

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Americans of Japanese descent, Infantrymen of the 442nd Regiment, run for cover as a German artillery shell is about to land outside the building. Italy | DocsTeach: Documents

Americans of Japanese descent, Infantrymen of the 442nd Regiment, run for cover as a German artillery shell is about to land outside the building. Italy | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

Although many Americans questioned the agendas of Japanese-Americans living in the United States after the attack on Pearl Harbor, it cannot be argued that many Americans of Japanese decent were willing to gve the ultimate sacrifice for democracy, as can be seen in this photograph.

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Judgment, September 8, 1942 | DocsTeach: Documents

Judgment, September 8, 1942 | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

This is the cover sheet for the case United States vs. Korematsu. Toyosaburo Korematsu was a Japanese-Americans was was forced to live in a prison camp during WWII. In this famous court case, he argued that his civil liberties were being trampled on. 

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Ansel Adams’s Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar - (American Memory from the Library of Congress)

Ansel Adams’s Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar - (American Memory from the Library of Congress) | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

Another set of powerful photographs but one of our most revered photographers.

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File:Map of World War II Japanese American internment camps.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

File:Map of World War II Japanese American internment camps.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this map, we can see all 10 of the relocation centers, and their locations. As you can see on the map, many of the relocation centers are far from the west coast.

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Final Accountability Roster of Residents at Manzanar Relocation Camp | DocsTeach: Documents

Final Accountability Roster of Residents at Manzanar Relocation Camp | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

The information included in the roster includes the evacuee’s surname, first name, other names, family number, sex, date of birth, marital status, citizenship status, alien registration number, type of original entry, date of original entry, preevacuation address, center address, type of final departure, date of final departure, and destination on final departure.

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Relocating a People | DocsTeach: Documents

Relocating a People | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this brochure, we can see that Franklin D. Roosevelt has encouraged the hiring of Japanese Americans in order to support the war effort. Here in this brochure, information on how to hire a relocated Japanese American can be found.

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Photograph of Dust Storm at Manzanar War Relocation Authority Center | DocsTeach: Documents

Photograph of Dust Storm at Manzanar War Relocation Authority Center | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this picture we can see what the inside of the relocation camps looked like. This picture was taken during a massive dust storm.

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Translation of a Handbill with List of Demands by the Voice of Nisei | DocsTeach: Documents

Translation of a Handbill with List of Demands by the Voice of Nisei | DocsTeach: Documents | Japanese Internment during WWII | Scoop.it

In this letter we can see how the Japanese Americans living in the work camps were treated. Although they could be drafted into the United States military, they were still treated as second class citizens. In this document we can see that the Japanese Americans wanted their rights that were granted by the Constitution.

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Japanese American Internment Camps -History 12

This video, which was created as a history project, was created using interviews with the student's grandparents who suffered through the internment camps of WWII. In this video, many pictures are used which show what life was like for the Japanese Americans during WWII. The lyrics and music were created by the students as well, which tells the story of the student's grandparents.

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