Jane Goodall Institute Australia
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Pictured: Pregnant orangutan clinging to the last remaining forest tree after bulldozers clear jungle to make way for oil plantation

Pictured: Pregnant orangutan clinging to the last remaining forest tree after bulldozers clear jungle to make way for oil plantation | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
Pregnant orangutan clinging to the last remaining forest tree after bulldozers clear jungle to make way for oil plantationHeartwrenching scenes as frightened animals lose habitat in BorneoMany left starving and on brink of death by destruction of treesRescuers stun them with anesthetic guns and capture them in netsRead more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2305277/Pictured-Pregnant-orangutan-clinging-remaining-forest-tree-bulldozers-clear-jungle-make-way-oil-plantation.html#ixzz2QG9KsdhN ; Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
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Orangutans plan their travel route up to one day in advance and communicate it to other members of their clan

Orangutans plan their travel route up to one day in advance and communicate it to other members of their clan | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
“ Male orangutans plan their travel route up to one day in advance and communicate it to other members of their species. In order to attract females and repel male rivals, they call in the direction in which they are going to travel.” In order to attract females and repel male rivals, they call in the direction in which they are going to travel. Anthropologists at the University of Zurich have found that not only captive, but also wild-living orangutans make use of their planning ability. For a long time it was thought that only humans had the ability to anticipate future actions, whereas animals are caught in the here and now. But in recent years, clever experiments with great apes in zoos have shown that they do remember past events and can plan for their future needs. Anthropologists at the University of Zurich have now investigated whether wild apes also have this skill, following them for several years through the dense tropical swamplands of Sumatra. Orangutans generally journey through the forest alone, but they also maintain social relationships. Adult males sometimes emit loud 'long calls' to attract females and repel rivals. Their cheek pads act as a funnel for amplifying the sound in the same way as a megaphone. Females that only hear a faint call come closer in order not to lose contact. Non-dominant males on the other hand hurry in the opposite direction if they hear the call coming loud and clear in their direction. "To optimize the effect of these calls, it thus would make sense for the male to call in the direction of his future whereabouts, if he already knew about them," explains Carel van Schaik. "We then actually observed that the males traveled for several hours in approximately the same direction as they had called." In extreme cases, long calls made around nesting time in the evening predicted the travel direction better than random until the evening of the next day.Carel van Schaik and his team conclude that orangutans plan their route up to a day ahead. In addition, the males often announced changes in travel direction with a new, better-fitting long call. The researchers also found that in the morning, the other orangutans reacted correctly to the long call of the previous evening, even if no new long call was emitted. "Our study makes it clear that wild orangutans do not simply live in the here and now, but can imagine a future and even announce their plans. In this sense, then, they have become a bit more like us," concludes Carel van Schaik.
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Australian endangered species: Christmas Island Forest Skink

“Gump has lived a cossetted life, nurtured in a cage on Christmas Island. Until last year, she had two acquaintances, but misadventure claimed them both.Now there is only Gump.”
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Blood Coltan | Watch Free Documentary Online

Blood Coltan | Watch Free Documentary Online | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
The mobile phone is a remarkable piece of engineering. But look inside. There’s blood in this machine. There’s blood in this device because your mobile contains tiny electronic circuits, and they couldn’t work without mineral called COLTAN.

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Scrambling for Africa’s Resources | #Africa #Libya #Africom #NATO #EU #US #Gold #Economy

Scrambling for Africa’s Resources | #Africa #Libya #Africom #NATO #EU #US #Gold #Economy | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

" It’s more than about oil, stupid. It’s for vast African riches. Resource/mineral wars define America’s agenda. 

On December 15, 2006, the United States Africa Command (AFRICOM) was authorized. On February 6, 2007, it was announced.

On October 1, 2007, it was established. On October 1, 2008, it became operational. It’s mission is controlling Africa’s riches.

They’re vast. They’re some of the world’s largest and richest. Potential new deposits await to be found. Others known about await development. Modern exploration methods enable global exploitation. Virtually nothing escapes discovery.

Africa’s rich in oil, gas, gold, silver, diamonds, uranium, iron, copper, tin, lead, nickel, coal, cobalt, bauxite, wood, coltan, manganese, chromium, vanadium-bearing titanium, and much more. ... "

 


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Do Rats Feel Empathy?

Do Rats Feel Empathy? | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
A new study finds rats prefer helping others over eating sweets. What does that mean for the way we treat animals?

 

Anyone who’s kept up with the latest and greatest about the cognitive, emotional, and moral lives of nonhuman animals knows surprises are being uncovered almost daily, and that many non-primate animals are showing intellectual and emotional capacities that rival those of the great apes. Some fascinating new results about empathy in laboratory rats caution against our tooting our “we’re so special” horn too loudly or proudly.


Over the past few years we’ve learned much about the moral lives of animals. Detailed studies have shown that mice and chickens display empathy—and now we know rats do, too.

 

By Marc Bekoff


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The Mid-Life Crisis Strikes Apes, Too | HealthWorks Collective

The Mid-Life Crisis Strikes Apes, Too | HealthWorks Collective | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
A study of 508 great apes in captivity shows that the animals’ sense of well-being bottoms out in their late 20s to mid-30s, the ape equivalent of middle age...
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Great apes make sophisticated decisions: Research suggests that great apes are capable of calculating the odds before taking risks

Great apes make sophisticated decisions: Research suggests that great apes are capable of calculating the odds before taking risks | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees, orangutans, gorillas and bonobos make more sophisticated decisions than was previously thought. Great apes weigh their chances of success, based on what they know and the likelihood to succeed when guessing, according to a new study.

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Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas » Comics Worth Reading

Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas » Comics Worth Reading | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

This science biography about three anthropologists who lived with primates is astounding. I’ve heard of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey before, but I didn’t realize just what they accomplished. This story brings their discoveries to life.

In 1960, Goodall lived in Africa for a long-term observation of chimpanzees. It’s a good thing that she didn’t mind spending a lot of time alone, doing nothing but watching animals, because she discovered them using tools. That was a revelation, since until that time, it was thought only humans could do so. In 1971, Biruté Galdikas was the first to closely observe wild orangutans. Dian Fossey wanted to see mountain gorillas, and her writing allowed her to get to Rwanda, where she also fought poachers, ultimately leading to her death.

Maris Wicks’ art is nicely simple. It makes me happy to read about these people and monkeys; they’re cute, but their experiences are also clear and inspiring. I’ve only read one of her comics before, but I’ll be on the lookout for anything else she does in future. She does great work with the various apes and their behaviors, so important to a book about observing them.


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Sign of empathy: Bonobos comfort friends in distress

Sign of empathy: Bonobos comfort friends in distress | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

Bonobos display consolation behavior, a sign of sensitivity to the emotions of others and the ability to take the perspective of another.

 

Comforting a friend or relative in distress may be a more hard-wired behavior than previously thought, according to a new study of bonobos, which are great apes known for their empathy and close relation to humans and chimpanzees. This provides key evolutionary insight into how critical social skills may develop in humans. The results were published by the journal PLOS One.

 

Researchers from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, observed juvenile bonobos at the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo engaging in consolation behavior more than their adult counterparts. Juvenile bonobos (3 to 7 years old) are equivalent in age to preschool or elementary school-aged children.

 

By Lisa Newbern


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Gail Rogers's curator insight, February 10, 2013 12:08 PM

Bonobos are not robotic - but then, they don´t use social media!

Giuliano Cipollari's curator insight, February 16, 2013 8:00 AM

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How to protect great apes in forest concessions | Science Codex

How to protect great apes in forest concessions | Science Codex | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
A new report from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) highlights the plight of great apes in the forest concessions of Central Africa and recommends actions to improve protection for gorillas and chimpanzees in these...

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Animals endangered by wildlife trade in M'sia - ANN

Animals endangered by wildlife trade in M'sia - ANN | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

The illegal wildlife trade in Malaysia is rising at worrying levels despite stricter enforcement and heavier penalties.
Greedy traffickers who gain huge profits from the cruel and unethical trade are focusing on Malaysia as it is among the few countries which still has tigers, elephants, sun bears, pangolins and other sought after species.
A live tiger is worth about US$50,000 in the black market. Its skin alone can be worth up to $35,000.
A dead tiger’s carcass, without the skin, fetches about $5,000. The prized parts of the big cat are sold separately with its penis worth about $4,000.
Elephant tusks sell for $1,800 a kilo while rhinoceros horns are priced at about $97,000 a kilo.
Under the new Wildlife Con­servation Act 2010, any person who sets or uses any snare for the purpose of hunting can face fines ran­ging from 50,000 ringgit and 100,000 ringgit ($16,000 and 32,300) be jailed for a maximum of two years.
The global illegal wildlife trade is worth an estimated $5 billion to $20 billion annually, with China, the US and Europe as prime markets.
Kanitha Krishnasamy, senior programme officer for Traffic Southeast Asia, a wildlife monitoring network, said the demand for wildlife parts was on the rise worldwide, with the rate of poaching for elephant tusks and rhinoceros horns at its highest in 20 years.


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:09 PM

Its crazy to see how more and more animals are being endangered everyday. Although, I can see how they are being endangered, since people are simply killing them for there fur or outside skin so designers can use for a product that eventually hit the sales. Its very sad that regardless the people who are killing the animals don't care, since that it what is feeding there family and themselves. I would hope that they would know about this and decide if they want to kill again and potentially have the animals endangered. 

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Bornean orangutans travel along the ground

Bornean orangutans travel along the ground | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
“ A recent study of forest in East Kalimantan, Borneo has found that orangutans travel on the ground far more often than expected.”
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Combat poverty while conserving great ape habitats – scientists

Combat poverty while conserving great ape habitats – scientists | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
“ Reshaping international policies that protect both great apes and the livelihoods of people living alongside them are critical to finding a positive outcome for both,” says Terry Sunderland, a senior scientist with the Center for International...”
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In Focus: Congo's Bloody Coltan

http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/africa/democratic-republic-congo-drc - Produced by the Pulitzer Center, "Congo's Bloody Coltan" is a quick glimpse at coltan's role in Congo's civil war...


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Phone Story - An awareness app (banned) game about unjust global manufacturer supply chain

Phone Story - An awareness app (banned) game about unjust global manufacturer supply chain | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

Phone Story is a game for smartphone devices that attempts to provoke a critical reflection on its own technological platform. Under the shiny surface of our electronic gadgets, behind its polished interface, hides the product of a troubling supply chain that stretches across the globe. Phone Story represents this process with four educational games that make the player symbolically complicit in coltan extraction in Congo, outsourced labor in China, e-waste in Pakistan and gadget consumerism in the West.

Keep Phone Story on your device as a reminder of your impact. All of the revenues raised go directly to workers' organizations and other non-profits that are working to stop the horrors represented in the game.


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Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo

Warlords, soldiers, and child laborers all toil over a mineral you've never even heard of. Coltan is a conflict mineral in nearly every cell phone, laptop, a...

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Orangutans develop different cultures like humans (Wired UK)

Orangutans develop different cultures like humans (Wired UK) | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
A team of anthropologists have shown that orangutans may have the ability to learn socially and pass these learnings down through generations -- evidence that culture in humans and great apes has the same evolutionary roots...

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Great apes go through mid-life crisis

Great apes go through mid-life crisis | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
Survey hints at biological cause for middle-age blues.

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You're more likely to catch a yawn from a relative than a stranger

You're more likely to catch a yawn from a relative than a stranger | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

"The importance of social bond in shaping yawn contagion demonstrates that empathy plays a leading role in the modulation of this phenomenon,"

 

Contagious yawning is also seen in monkeys and great apes. Indeed, this new study replicates similar findings with chimps, where the yawn contagion is greater between group members, and findings with baboons, for whom yawns are more often caught from intimate yawners (where intimacy is discerned from rates of mutual grooming). "When considered together," the researchers concluded, "these results suggest that the relationship between yawn contagion and empathy may have developed earlier than the last common ancestor between monkeys, humans and non-human apes."

 

by Christian Jarrett


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Chimps and humans share another unexpected evolutionary link: gut bacteria

Chimps and humans share another unexpected evolutionary link: gut bacteria | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

In the last few years, scientists have made great inroads in understanding the crucial interactive role gut bacteria play in harvesting nutrients, assisting immune systems, and protecting the host against pathogens.

 

Now Yale University researchers have discovered that humans and chimpanzees, our closest evolutionary relatives, share the same three distinct communities, or ecosystems, of bacteria in their guts.

 

These huge colonies of bacteria, which greatly outnumber the cells in a human body, have adapted to live in human gut and colon, and in turn interact with the host in a wide variety of functional ways. For instance, the colonies help synthesize vitamins and renew cells in the stomach.

 

Ochman and colleagues have been investigating why bacteria seemed to organize themselves into distinct communities called enterotypes. Each individual seems to harbor one of the three of these enterotypes in their gut, but the role of specific bacteria that make up each group is unknown. Some scientists have dismissed their importance, arguing they are merely the product of a diversity of diets.

 

However, the new paper shows that the chimpanzees from Gombe National Park studied by Jane Goodall have the same three groupings of bacteria. The findings suggest the enterotypes have played a crucial role in the evolution of great apes. Researchers were able to study samples from chimps at different periods of their lives and found individual chimpanzees change enterotypes over their lifetimes.


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Great apes may have 'mid-life crisis' like humans, new study suggests

Great apes may have 'mid-life crisis' like humans, new study suggests | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it

An international team of researchers assessed the well-being and happiness of the great apes. They found well-being was high in youth, fell to a low in midlife and rose again in old age, similar to the "U-shape curve" of happiness in humans. The study brought together experts such as psychologists, primatologists and economists. "What we are testing is whether the U-shaped curve can describe the association between age and well-being in non-human primates as it does in humans," psychologist and lead author Dr. Alexander Weiss of the University of Edinburgh told BBC Nature. Dr. Weiss hoped the results would show a similar curve because of the close relationship between humans, chimpanzees and orangutans.

 

The sample subjects included 508 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and orangutans (Pongo sp.) of varying ages, from zoos, sanctuaries and research centres. They were assessed by zoo keepers, volunteers, researchers and caretakers who had worked with the primate subject for at least two years and knew its behavior. The animals were numerically scored for well-being and happiness on a short questionnaire, which was based on a human well-being model but modified for use in non-human primates. Dr. Weiss said that the similarities between humans, chimps and orangutans go beyond genetics and physiology. For example, chimpanzees face similar social pressures and stress factors to humans.

 

"You don't have the chimpanzee hitting mid-life and suddenly they want a bright red sports car," explained Dr Weiss. "But there may be other things that they want like mating with more females or gaining access to more resources."

 

Co-author Andrew Oswald, professor of economics at the University of Warwick, has researched human happiness for 20 years. "One of the reasons we decided to look at ape data was that when you study humans, that U-shape is exactly the same when you adjust statistically for things like education, income and marriage. For Prof. Oswald it was "quite mind-blowing... to find it in apes".


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Chloe Cudaback's curator insight, April 10, 2014 3:52 AM

This is great! When you think of a mid-life crisis, you don't think about any other being other than a human. So here, we have a uniquely human behavior. Or now, a once thought uniquely human behavior. Researchers have found the same U-shaped curve of well-being over an animal's lifetime, where the bottom of that curve appears around mid-life. This is the model found in humans and researchers have found the same model to apply to chimpanzees as well. Talk about learning to empathize with these magnificent creatures. 

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ALERT!!! The UN Prepares To Go To War For The First Time, with a 3,000-strong task force sent to fight rebels in the Congo

ALERT!!! The UN Prepares To Go To War For The First Time, with a 3,000-strong task force sent to fight rebels in the Congo | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
Daily Mail - by Daniel Miller The UN is about to go to war for the first time in its history after the Security Council voted unanimously to intervene to fight rebels in the Congo. Around 3,000 UN ...

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Aten Makh's curator insight, June 15, 2013 3:46 PM

UN protects corporate interests.

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Protest - Malaysia sacrifices its elephants for palm oil - Rainforest Rescue

Protest - Malaysia sacrifices its elephants for palm oil - Rainforest Rescue | Jane Goodall Institute Australia | Scoop.it
Over the past weeks, 14 Borneo pygmy elephants were poisoned in the Malaysian state of Sabah. The rare animals are considered pests on the oil palm plantations that are rapidly eating into the rainforests.
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