Jane Austen
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Discover more about Jane Austen at the British Library - English and Drama blog

Discover more about Jane Austen at the British Library - English and Drama blog | Jane Austen | Scoop.it
Jane Austen’s novels about life in Georgian England are now some of the most famous in the English language.
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Joanna Trollope on five great books about Jane Austen

Joanna Trollope on five great books about Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Scoop.it

Joanna Trollope, who has reimagined a great Austen novel in her own 'Sense & Sensibility', picks five great works about 'dear Jane' (RT @OWC_Oxford: Five great books about Austen, as chosen by Joanna Trollope.


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Malcolm Bradbury on Jane Austen: "Today nobody can dismiss Miss Austen"

Malcolm Bradbury on Jane Austen: "Today nobody can dismiss Miss Austen" | Jane Austen | Scoop.it

The Guardian Malcolm Bradbury on Jane Austen: "Today nobody can dismiss Miss Austen. She flourishes as never before. Her books appear in best-seller lists, versions of her work bounce across film and TV screens, in a travestied flurry of balls, carriage rides, walks through friendly woods. She attracts feminist sympathy, romantic identification, theme-park nostalgia, Georgian revivalism, Tory appreciation, Marxist approval, literary homage, critical deconstruction. . ."


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Why Do We Love Being Scared So Much?

Why Do We Love Being Scared So Much? | Jane Austen | Scoop.it

A kind of literature specifically designed to inspire fear emerged in England at the end of the 18th century, and its legacy remains hugely influential. It very serendipitously and inappropriately became known as "Gothic" and it relied heavily on "props" and "melodrama." The settings were ruined castles, graveyards, and sinister old houses. Its lurid plots involved charming villains, duped innocents, shameful secrets, terrifying ghosts, mad scientists, and devastating revelations. Apart from the somewhat later Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," the books are largely forgotten. (Walpole's "The Castle of Otranto" and Ann Radcliffe's "The Mysteries of Udolpho" are the best-known examples.) We probably know the genre best from Jane Austen's satire on it in "Northanger Abbey."


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How to live well: The moral gaze of Jane Austen – Opinion – ABC Religion & Ethics (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

How to live well: The moral gaze of Jane Austen – Opinion – ABC Religion & Ethics (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Jane Austen | Scoop.it
Jane Austen was a brilliant moral philosopher, whose books are deeply serious morality plays underneath the veneer of romantic comedy that helped them sell. They are a moral education masquerading as entertainment.

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It Was a Dark and Stormy Night - New York Times

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night - New York Times | Jane Austen | Scoop.it
It Was a Dark and Stormy Night
New York Times
Val McDermid's “Northanger Abbey” is the second book to emerge from the Austen Project, in which Jane Austen's published oeuvre is reimagined by 21st-century authors.
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