JAKEDeCELLES A Midsummer Night's Dream
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What are we commenting on?

I'm confused

 

Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

so I have placed random comments all over the scoop it pages of my classmates. No idea what the criteria is or when it is due. Confused.

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Illustration

Illustration | JAKEDeCELLES A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

This picture shows the comedic value of Shakespeare's plays. A man with this head of an animal is always a funny thing to see which is why this picture has greater value than ink and parchment. Too often people take Shakespeare's plays too seriously and forget the true purpose of the plays... to entertain. It was meant to be performed , not read. Much of the play's conversations were there to fill space and minor characters really didn't have any meaning. Do you want to know how to understand a Shakespearean work? Well reading and analyzing for days isn't the way. Sometimes you need a little "people with the heads of animals" to truly "get" something. 

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Preexisting Source

Preexisting Source | JAKEDeCELLES A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century wrote a timeless tale as a part of The Canterbury Tales. These toes were written in Iambic Pentameter and verse and include a plot of forbidden love centered around a main character, Theseus, who is the Duke of Athens. This story leads to a very simple implication that Shakespeare, writing A Midsummer Nights Dream the late 1500's, could have easily drawn upon the predating texts of The Canterbury Tales with relative ease. Did Shakespeare use these texts? Who knows! Ask a literary historian specializing in this era and he might say, "I haven't the foggiest...". However, plots of "forbidden love" involving characters with the same name tend to have relationships beyond coincidence. 

 

Robertson Jr., D.W. "The Probable Date And Purpose Of Chaucer's Knight's Tale." Studies In Philology 84.4 (1987): 418. Academic Search Elite. Web. 10 Feb. 2013.

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Literary Criticism

Literary Criticism | JAKEDeCELLES A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

This criticism offers a unique stance and approach to Shakespeare's A Midsummer Nights Dream. The critique focuses mainly on the natural references in the play and more specifically, the birds mentioned in Nick Bottom's song. In addition, it offers insight towards the reappearing term "quill" in the play. Whereas at various other points in the play it is used to describe the Elizabethan writing utensil, Shakepseare uses it here to mean the mute voice of a small bird. Most likely another one of Shakespeare's complex cross-references, this term, as well as others, are addressed in this criticism. 

 

Blythe, David-Everett. "Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream." Explicator 55.1 (1996): 8. Academic Search Elite. Web. 2 Mar. 2013.

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Motion Picture

Trailer: Midsummer Night's Rave, A (2002)
Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

This adaptation of Shakespeare's  A Midsummer Nights Dream offers a very modern twist on the Shakespeare's timeless play. These twists include Puck as a drug dealer, which might be fair to the erotic content that Shakespeare intended his plays to be viewed with. This film was R-rated for excessive drug use and profane sexual content.

 

"Midsummer Night's Rave, A (2002)." Dailymotion. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2013.

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Historical Connection

Historical Connection | JAKEDeCELLES A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sir Jake DeCelles's insight:

The Elizabethan era began a new era of technology and scientific discoveries, but one thing remained the same: the use of superstition to explain complicated phenomena. The appearance of fairies, witches, and demons was much more frequent in this era than modern day, thus resulting in a natural repulsion to these principles. The explanation is simple, there are mandated educational standards in the modern world, many of which teach the value of questioning supernatural ideas and providing scientific solutions. This article provides insight as to the norm of superstition in the Elizabethan era, and explains why Shakespeare, as well as other great play writes of the time period, used supernatural beings, such as the fairies in A Midsummer Night's Dream, to evoke mystical thoughts in the minds of the spectators. 

 

"Spirits." Shakespeare's Theatre: A Dictionary Of His Stage Context(2004): 434-436. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Feb. 2013.

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Kevin G Taratuta's comment, March 10, 2013 10:33 PM
This is enlightening, in all of my experience of history I never considered the fact the people during the Age of Exploration would believe that there were indeed fairies and other mythical creatures around. Researching local lore on these beasts should be quite interesting, good work Jake.