Jacobson. Kasanovich. Palmer. A Midsummer Night's Dream.
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Northern Ballet's A Midsummer Night's Dream: Oberon & Puck - YouTube

To buy tickets visit... http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/a-midsummer-nights-dream/new-victoria-theatre/ Northern Ballet's A Midsummer Night's Dream sees the r...
Faith Jacobson's insight:

This scene from the Northern Ballets interpretation of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"" depicts act II, scene I, in which Oberon is scheming to humiliate his wife Titania.  His motives behind configuring this prank against his own wife are his immature jealousy of the child that she has been taking care of and the lack of attention he is paid.  He sends Puck, his servant fairy, to seek a flower which was once hit by one of Cupid's arrows.  This part of the ballet is supposed to replicate the interaction between Puck and Oberon.  If this flower is placed on Titania's eyelids it will cause her to fall in love with the first living thing she lays eyes on.  Eventually in the play, this will cause her to fall in love with Bottom who has the head of an ass, and the spell will cause Oberon much distress because he fears he has made a horrible mistake by using this magical force against his own wife.  This scene not only displays the selfish demeanor of Oberon---seen in his envious feelings towards Titania's care towards a child---but it also shows the dangerous combination of him and Puck.  Puck has always been a trickster and is infamous for his pranks, and when the two are put together Puck does not even hesitate when asked to put a potion in Titania's sleeping eyes.  At the end of this video he is sending him off to find the potion which is just the start of the trouble he will cause.           

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Image | Jacobson. Kasanovich. Palmer. A Midsummer Night's Dream. | Scoop.it

Midsummer Night's Dream

Henry Fuseli, Engraving

Act IV Scene 1

Included in Boydell Shakespeare Gallery

Faith Jacobson's insight:

This image, an engraving by Henry Fuseli, a Swiss artist who created many works for John Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery, is an image that portrays act IV scene I.  Within this scene of the play Titania and Bottom lay together sleeping. Titania is under the influence of a love potion that Oberon has placed on her which has caused her to fall in love with Bottom despite the fact that he has been cursed with the head of an ass.  Within this image Titania's fairy servants are taking orders to fulfill her and her new lover Bottom's every request.  Puck and Oberon enter later on in this scene to find that Oberon's plan to humiliate her has been extremely successful, however Oberon feels horribly about his actions towards his wife Titania. This image depicts the strange, otherworldly  atmosphere within this scene.  

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Literary Criticism: "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Faith Jacobson's insight:

This literary criticism written by Robert C. Evans in 2010 is an in depth exploration of the character Puck, and his development throughout A Midsummer Nights dream. More specifically, the essay expands upon the ways in which Shakespeare creates the character Puck's trickster identity. This essay was found and chosen based on the insight it contains on the role of Puck in the play. In order to provide a valid and well structured analysis of this character the author utilizes past definitions and descriptions of the 'trickster' role that have been made by other scholars. The author also utilizes various scenes in which Puck has a role in order to provide a multi-dimensional examination of his character. According to one argument within the essay, Puck is almost immediately associated with the archetypal characteristics of a trickster. Puck has both cunning and intelligence; a strong combination, especially paired with his deceitful tendencies. However, Robert C. Evans also describes Puck as a character of extreme complexity. This literary criticism yields a new understanding of Puck in a Midsummer Night's Dream, and in doing so provides a new, more-detailed perspective on the play itself.

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William Shakespeare.

William Shakespeare. | Jacobson. Kasanovich. Palmer. A Midsummer Night's Dream. | Scoop.it
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Faith Jacobson's insight:

Historical Article: William Shakespeare, the writer of A Midsummer Night's Dream and many other plays, is still admired today for his literary works. This article captures William Shakespeare's life from when he was born on April 23, 1564, to when he died on April 23, 1616, and emphasizes his universally recognized playwriting abilities. This was chosen as a historical article for this project based on its thorough analysis of Shakespeare's life. Born in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare is believed to have been educated at a local grammar school. In 1582, he married Anne Hathaway and moved to London, where he was successful in playwriting and acting. His professional life in London is marked by several of his most famous plays. His plays were given special presentation at the courts of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I, and he was very successful. His life gives the reader of A Midsummer Night's Dream a idea of the way in which it was created. The article, by giving a detailed account of the plays writer, also gives those who read it information on the possible influences on the play. So, in that way the historical article is an important read in relation to A Midsummer Nights Dream. 

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Source: "Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter"

Source: "Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter" | Jacobson. Kasanovich. Palmer. A Midsummer Night's Dream. | Scoop.it

Source Article

Faith Jacobson's insight:

Puck the fairy, also know as Robin Good-fellow, is a knavish character fond of trickery. Shakespeare wrote him to be a character wrapped in the theme of illusion. He was an obedient servant to Oberon, but never hid his tendencies to create discord wherever he could manage. Puck displayed an intricate and fascinating persona, but not one that is entirely Shakespeare's design. This article titled "Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter" explains exactly where Shakespeare's inspiration for his character Puck was rooted. These sources included Old Norse, Irish, German, and Latvian variations of the same mischievous figure. As another source for the character, the article explains that the fairy going by two different names is a result of Shakespeare combining Puck with the shape-shifter Robin Good-fellow, who was another figure who would have been well-known in the folklore of the Elizabethan era. So, as this article illustrates, Shakespeare's source for his character Puck is in fact two figures with similar qualities that appear in the folklore of Shakespeare's time as well as ages before then.

 

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