Italia Mia
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Italia Mia
Digital Curation Blog about Italy. Great Resources online discovered for you. Feed your corporate blog or your social media presence with our contents. Be sure to find daily updates and the best of the net related to everything is ITALY. Travel, food, fashion, news, culture and much more.
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What to Wear to the Vatican: Tips from a Roman Tour Guide

What to Wear to the Vatican: Tips from a Roman Tour Guide | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

If a trip to Rome is in your future, here are a few ideas on what to wear to the Vatican any time of year. Tips from a fashionable vatican tour guide! [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Generally speaking when entering any religious building modesty should be considered. However, depending on varying factors this may or may not be enforced or practiced.

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Travel and Shopping in Italy: Top Ten Italian Shoemakers

Travel and Shopping in Italy: Top Ten Italian Shoemakers | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Italy is famous for style, cutting-edge fashion and the high quality of its leather goods. Italian panache, expertise and craftsmanship are evident in the technical skills of its shoemakers. Italians have pioneered classic designs from wedges to loafers, and they continue to do so, leaving their mark on the world’s catwalks and sidewalks. Carol King selects 10 of Italy’s premier shoe designers. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:
  1. Alberto Fermani
  2. Bruno Magli
  3. Elsa Schiaparelli
  4. Geox
  5. Giuseppe Zanotti
  6. Gucci
  7. Prada
  8. Salvatore Ferragamo
  9. Sergio Rossi
  10. Tod’s
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How fashion is saving Italy's monuments

How fashion is saving Italy's monuments | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Commercial logos on historic sites may seem crass, but in Italy there may be no other way to preserve cherished monuments.

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Corinna Ramsay's curator insight, November 24, 2013 1:54 PM

Does seem extreme but cost of preserving the many monuments is very high. I wonder if the 'sponsorships' will blend in more over time..

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How to Dress Like an Italian: Spring Edition

How to Dress Like an Italian: Spring Edition | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Everyone’s heard about Italian fashion—which means some travelers worry about what to wear in Italy.
Here’s the good news: You don’t have to dress exactly like an Italian, and no one will expect you to! The most important thing to keep in mind is to wear what makes you most comfortable. That’s not always (or even usually) what Italians will be wearing… and that’s perfectly okay.
That said, a lot of travelers do want to try to dress like the locals when they travel. They see it as a way to “blend in” a bit more (although, of course, keep in mind that you’ll still be given away by something, like your hand gestures or even makeup—before you even open your mouth!). Plus, we love the idea of cultural immersion while traveling. And since fashion is an important part of Italian culture, what could be a more fun kind of cultural immersion than dressing as the locals do?
Need some tips to get started on how to dress like the Italians?
Here’s your checklist of items to look out for—and that you’ll see lots of Italians wearing—in the spring!

  • A light jacket, or trench coat, for women [...]
  • A well-tailored jacket, for men [...]
  • A great pair of sunglasses [...]
  • Pants in fun colors - like green, red, or pink (yes, for men, too!) [...]
  • Leather or suede shoes [...]
  • Jewelry, for women [...]
  • Scarves, for both genders [...]
  • A chic handbag, for women—or a “man bag,” for men [...]

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Rosana Mondino's curator insight, April 14, 2013 5:57 PM

add your insight...

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Rules for mastering la moda Italiana

Rules for mastering la moda Italiana | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Before the days of Instagram and street style photographers, Italian style equated to the effortless bombshell chic of Sophia Loren and Isabella Rosselini. For those of us who want to channel a little “Roman Holiday” in our wardrobe, we turned to Laura Manara, the Buenos Aires-born resort wear designer who’s called Milan home for decades. Here are her rules for mastering la moda Italiana. [...]

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zemmel hamza's curator insight, March 14, 2015 12:58 PM

3 famme vectime gretio

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Sexy Italians Turn Base Jumping Into Fashion Catwalk In The Sky

Sexy Italians Turn Base Jumping Into Fashion Catwalk In The Sky | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Leave it to the Italians to take something as utilitarian as base jumping and turn it into an elegant fashion cat walk, starting with the gorgeous/crazy Roberta Mancino base jumping in high heels and a sequin dress.
Watch Roberta & Friends  jump from Italy’s Monte Brento looking fresh and stylish in Roberto Cavalli high end clothing. There’s something about seeing them jumping in street clothes that make the jumps look crazier than the regular ones...

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The “panno Casentino”: One small error for Tuscany becomes one lasting memory for fashion

The “panno Casentino”: One small error for Tuscany becomes one lasting memory for fashion | Italia Mia | Scoop.it

Only the innovative nature of the Italians can turn inexperience and a huge miscalculation into a fashion statement. And only those Italians from Tuscany knew how to make it a statement that would last through the test of time.
Wool has been a constant, thriving economic force in Italy as far back as the Etruscans, Romans and the Medici Family. It is a well known fact that the banking houses in Florence built their wealth on the wool industry. The Casentino Valley, where the Arno river starts its trek to Florence, was perhaps one of the largest suppliers of high quality woolen products in Tuscany.
In the late 1800’s they sought to further commercialize their natural resource, and a “mantelline per cavalcature” was introduced to the Florentine market. This was basically a thick, water resistant blanket used to cover, keep warm and protect work animals that hauled large loads.
Traditionally, this cover was made in a deep red – but due to an error when they mixed the chemicals to soften the wool, the color came out a vivid orange. Like most trends, it was a twist of fate that turned this rough cloth with its unique color, fashionable.
The “panno Casentino” was admired by illustrious names such as Baron Ricasoli and the opera composers Giuseppe Verdi and Giacomo Puccini. The result was that this brightly colored felted wool was fashioned into a double breasted jacket complete with a fox fur collar which became a very Italian symbol of wealth and prestige of the upper echelon.

A reputation that is still widely recognized in Italy today.

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