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Voler un distributeur de billets sous #XP avec un #SMS ? Simple sur le papier...

Voler un distributeur de billets sous #XP avec un #SMS ? Simple sur le papier... | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Dévaliser un distributeur automatique de billets sous Windows XP grâce à un SMS, c’est le scénario raconté par l’éditeur Symantec. Mais cette attaque est largement limitée par les conditions nécessaires à sa réalisation.
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#Windows Commands and Tools – Part 1 via @ale_sp_brazil

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#Vulnerable #Encoded #URL

#Vulnerable #Encoded #URL | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
This paper especially pinpoints the poor practice of cryptography in URL, which is typically implemented to encrypt sensitive data residing in the website
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#Microsoft signale une faille critique dans #Word

#Microsoft signale une faille critique dans #Word | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
L’équipe sécurité de Google a signalé à Microsoft l’existence d’une vulnérabilité de Word déjà exploitée sur Internet pour des attaques informatiques. La faille se situe au niveau du support des fichiers RTF et affecte toutes les versions de Word.
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#Vulnerability Summary for the Week of March 17, 2014 | US - #CERT

Vulnerability Summary for the Week of March 17, 2014
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#Wireless #Security #Megaprimer 3

Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.
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#Wireless #LAN #Security #Megaprimer 1

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Comparison: #Zerto vs. Site Recovery Manager (#SRM) & #vSphere #Replication - Virtualization Software

Comparison: #Zerto vs. Site Recovery Manager (#SRM) & #vSphere #Replication - Virtualization Software | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Virtualization has made disaster recovery tremendously less complex for companies, large and small. In fact, it’s not a stretch to say that virtualization has made disaster recovery “possible” at many companies, simply because prior to virtualization it was technically overwhelming ... Read More
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Reverse engineering NAND Flash for fun and profit

Reverse engineering NAND Flash for fun and profit | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Flash memory is used everywhere. It is in the game console in your
living room; it is in the phone in your pocket; it is in the router in
your network. Flash memory was invented by a Japanese researcher, Dr.
Fujio Masuoka around 1980 and it is so amazing that this technology is
now used everywhere - more than 30 years after its invention. A few
weeks ago, I had the chance to reverse-engineer a hardware device we
bought from eBay. The purpose of our investigation was to
penetration-test the device, but I had no idea how to approach it. I was
locked out of the machine by a password and even the seller didn’t know
what it was (I assumed the seller was just a sort of liquidation
company). However, the machine was so cheap that we couldn’t complain
about the deal – password or not. So to penetration-test this machine,
we knew there’d have to be some level of hardware reverse engineering.
When we opened up the machine, we found that it was using an ARM CPU
(Samsung S3C2410AL) and had chips related to communications through
Ethernet and serial ports. We also found that it had two DRAM (Dynamic
Random Access Memory) chips and one Flash memory chip (Samsung
K4S561632H). (I think this is a pretty typical setup for modern embedded
machines.) First, we tried looking for JTAG ports, but got kind of stuck
with that for some reason. Then we thought we might try dumping Flash
memory directly. De-solderingThe first step was taking out the Flash
memory chip itself. I had read about some approaches that connect wires
to a chip directly without extracting it. There’s even a clip-type
socket that you can put over a Flash memory chip directly without taking
it out. We tried that approach, but the problem was that when you supply
electricity to the Flash memory, it actually flows through other parts
of the board and wakes up other chips and it interferes with our
bit-banging operation. So we decided to extract the chip. This might
sound a little tricky, but it‘s a well-established process. You can get
products that you apply to the pins on the chip to melt out the existing
solder, but while this approach is valid, we decided to use a hot air
gun to heat up the solder and take the chips out while the solder was
fluid. It took us about 30 seconds to 1 minute to take the Flash memory
out. Figure 1 De-soldering in progress with hot air gun Figure 1 shows
the process of blowing hot air to melt the solder, while Figure 2 shows
the extracted Flash memory chip. Just be sure to not touch the pins as
they are really sensitive. If those pins are not aligned, you might have
a hard time trying to make things work correctly. Figure 2 Extracted
NAND Flash Bit-bangingWe searched for information about Flash memory
dumping and found many different approaches. The approach we thought the
most useful and decided to try was FT2232H bit-banging. Bit-banging is a
method of controlling chips directly from software through serial
communication. FT2232H NAND flash reader had some good information on
the steps to take and the author had also released some basic schematics
and toolsets. This method uses the FT2232H chipset, which converts USB
to serial protocol, to send control commands to NAND Flash directly. The
software library the author used was libFTDI, which supports various
FTDI chipsets. One good thing about using this library is that it
supports multiple OSes including Linux, Windows, MacOS X. While the
author released software that can use this library to control Flash
memory, another project that had forked out from the original code
caught our eye. The new forked project supports writing to NAND flash as
well as reading from it and we found this new code to be more stable
(even just for the reading operations).Instead of soldering the chip
onto a new breakout board, we bought a ready-made breakout board for the
FTDI chipset (Figure 3). There are quite a few variants of FTDI breakout
board on the market, and as this FTDI chipset is quite popular with
hobbyists, it shouldn’t be difficult to find something similar. Figure 3
FTDI breakout board As the NAND Flash memory we were trying to dump was
48 pin, we purchased a TSOP48-to-DIP48 converter for easy wiring. Figure
4 shows the final device we came up with. We just loaded the extracted
Flash memory chip on the TSOP48 socket and connected the device to the
laptop using a USB cable. Figure 4 Bit-banging in action Pages, blocks,
ECCFigure 5 shows the basic information identified by NandTool. It is a
64MB Flash memory with a page size of 512 bytes. OOB size is 16 bytes.
This information is valuable as the dumped out image uses it for
post-processing. Figure 5 NAND Flash Information In NAND Flash memory, a
page is the minimum element for data storage. A page in NAND Flash
memory is a similar concept to a sector on a hard disk. 32 pages make
one block in our case. The thing here is that there can always be
physically damaged blocks or pages. The OOB area is used to store this
out of band information. The actual usage of the OOB area differs
slightly between vendors and chip models. Even the method for locating
the OOB area is variable. Figure 6 Data & OOB Area We found that the
first 3 bytes of the OOB area is used for ECC (Error Correcting Code).
ECC uses the concept of Hamming code, to correct 1 bit errors from the
page data. The concept is very similar to parity bit, but this checksum
can also be used for correcting a single corrupt bit (rather than just
detecting the error). This is useful not only for ensuring data
integrity, but also self correcting when the error is minor. Hamming
code itself was invented in 1950 and it is still used in many areas. The
amazing thing is that you need just 3 bytes to cover 512 bytes of data.
The problem here is that each vendor uses a slightly different
algorithm. You just need to figure out what algorithm it uses to make
sure every page is intact. There are some popular known algorithms used
by each vendor and you need to tweak those if the known algorithm
doesn’t work. Figuring out the ECC algorithm is really important because
when you want to modify the data on the memory chip, you need to
re-calculate the ECC. Also, you need to check if there are any bad
blocks in the memory image. Each chip has a slightly different approach
for that and you need to figure that out too. Memory layoutSo after
figuring out how the lowest level page system works, you need to extract
pages from the original dump. After that, you are ready to work on the
layout. Based on the configuration, the CPU tries to load the bootloader
from different devices. If Flash memory exists, the CPU usually tries to
load instructions from the first page of the Flash memory . This is
usually called the “1st stage bootloader”. You can see our example in
Figure 7. It performs very low level operations to initialize values for
the CPU. After that it jumps to the 2nd stage bootloader. Figure 7 1st
stage bootloader Actually, U-boot was used as the 2nd stage bootloader
in our case, which is typical with embedded systems. Figure 8 shows the
typical Flash memory layout in embedded systems in general. U-boot loads
the OS kernel and the kernel mounts the file system. We found that our
target system was using the Linux kernel and JFFS2 type file system.
This is also very typical. Now, after we figured out the memory layout,
we needed to dig into whatever we wanted to acquire. In this case, we
wanted to access the file system. Figure 8 Flash memory layout Mounting
the file systemThe good news is that you can use a Linux system to load
a JFFS2 image file. You just need to use the mtdram feature. To
initialize the mtdram feature, run the commands shown in Figure 9.
Figure 9 Loading required modules After extracting the jffs2 part from
the Flash image file, use the “dd” command to write the bits to the
mtdblock device as shown in Figure 10. After that you can mount that
mtdblock to whatever location you want. Figure 10 Mouting through
mtdblock If you go to the mounted directory, you will see the files you
wanted to grab (Figure 11). Figure 11 Mouting extracted JFFS2 data Now
that you have everything you wanted, you can dig into the target files
using IDA. There may be a lot of interesting things to be found. Of
course, that means it’s time to hang up your hardware reverse
engineering hat and let your software reverse engineering skills take
the lead.
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#WiFi #Pentesting using #Android

#WiFi #Pentesting using #Android | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Securing your company’s wireless network is different and more challenging than securing the wired network. Many factors come into consideration when setting up and securing a wi fi network. Regular pen testing of your wifi network is also very importsnt. Today we are going to see how to perform a pen test on a wifi …
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#Windows Command Line Interface and Tools – Part 2 via @ale_sp_brazil

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#Storage Space et Storage #Tiering avec #Windows Server 2012 R2

Cloud Privé, Infrastructures Windows Server, Conseils pour la sécurité des PC dans l'entreprise, DirectAccess, sécurité, security
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Des failles dans les mises à jour d' #Android affectent 1 milliard de terminaux

Des failles dans les mises à jour d' #Android affectent 1 milliard de terminaux | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
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Important !! #Mail server problem - #IP #blacklisting - How to solve and prevent it

Important !! #Mail server problem - #IP #blacklisting - How to solve and prevent it | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Has Your Email Server's IP Been Blacklisted? If you run your own dedicated server, you may eventually encounter a problem sending email to certain domains
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Où la vie privée est-elle la mieux respectée ?

Où la vie privée est-elle la mieux respectée ? | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Voici une infographie réalisée par BackgroundChecks qui permet d'avoir une vision plus globale sur les pays qui protègent la vie privée de leurs citoyens. L'Espagne, la République tchèque, l'Islande, la Norvège et la Slovénie font partie des meilleurs protecteurs de la vie privée et des données personnelles. La France n'est pas trop mal lotie... La …
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#Android : une #vulnérabilité critique dans le système de permissions

#Android : une #vulnérabilité critique dans le système de permissions | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it

#Des permissions inexistantes sur les vieilles versions du système d'exploitation peuvent se retourner contre l'utilisateur lors de la mise à jour d'Android, qui les octroie par défaut.

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#Snoopy software can turn a #drone is a data stealer

#Snoopy software can turn a #drone is a data stealer | #CyberSecurity #CyberSécurité #Security #Sécurité #InfoSec #CyberDefence #GDPR #RGPD #DevOps #DevSecOps #SecDevOps | Scoop.it
Researchers at Sensepoint have realized a software that could be used to turn a drone in a perfect spying machine able to steal data from mobile devices.
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