IT and Leadership
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Essentials of a Successful Meeting PART II Discuss–Decide–Align–Act | LinkedIn

This post focusing on decision is the second in a four part series about the essential of a successful meeting.

Decision is the spine of any meeting---a meeting’s raison d’etre. A successful meeting is a deliberate process whose intent is to come to some finding that will move a company and its players including those beyond the meeting’s attendees to perceive a calculated launch point for action in a given direction. Although the direction appears to be linear it most often serves as the guide rails in a process, a check against wandering.
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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When to change how you lead | McKinsey & Company

When to change how you lead | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s fashionable to say we live in fast-changing times. Does that mean leadership itself must change?

Is leadership an immutable endeavor in which we learn as much from Alexander the Great and the Bhagavad Gita as from GM’s Mary Barra or Apple’s Tim Cook? Or does the role of the business leader change with the changing times? This ageless question formed the starting point for a wide-ranging discussion at a recent meeting of advisors to McKinsey’s Leadership Development Practice. The group included Helen Alexander, former CEO of The Economist Group; Robert Kegan, the developmental psychologist and author, from Harvard University; Nadir Mohamed, former CEO of Rogers Communications; and McKinsey partners Claudio Feser, Mary Meaney, and Tim Welsh. Quarterly editor in chief Allen Webb moderated the discussion. While conclusive answers may have been elusive, the conversation generated insights into a number of key aspects of leadership, including the effect of success on leaders, the benefits of failure in developing resilience, and the role of maturity and self-awareness.
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Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company

New research suggests that the secret to developing effective leaders is to encourage four types of behavior.

Telling CEOs these days that leadership drives performance is a bit like saying that oxygen is necessary to breathe. Over 90 percent of CEOs are already planning to increase investment in leadership development because they see it as the single most important human-capital issue their organizations face.1 And they’re right to do so: earlier McKinsey research has consistently shown that good leadership is a critical part of organizational health, which is an important driver of shareholder returns.2

A big, unresolved issue is what sort of leadership behavior organizations should encourage. Is leadership so contextual that it defies standard definitions or development approaches?3 Should companies now concentrate their efforts on priorities such as role modeling, making decisions quickly, defining visions, and shaping leaders who are good at adapting? Should they stress the virtues of enthusiastic communication? In the absence of any academic or practitioner consensus on the answers, leadership-development programs address an extraordinary range of issues, which may help explain why only 43 percent of CEOs are confident that their training investments will bear fruit.
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The agile manager | McKinsey & Company

The agile manager | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

The agile workplace is becoming increasingly common. In a McKinsey survey of more than 2,500 people across company sizes, functional specialties, industries, regions, and tenures, 37 percent of respondents said their organizations are carrying out company-wide agile transformations, and another 4 percent said their companies have fully implemented such transformations. The shift is driven by proof that small, multidisciplinary teams of agile organizations can respond swiftly and promptly to rapidly changing market opportunities and customer demands. Indeed, more than 80 percent of respondents in agile units report that overall performance increased moderately or significantly since their transformations began.

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From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick | McKinsey & Company

From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
By focusing on the “soft” side of lean and Six Sigma initiatives, leading global companies gain substantial, scalable, and sustainable advantages.

For companies seeking large-scale operational improvements, all roads lead to Toyota. Each year, thousands of executives tour its facilities to learn how lean production—the operational and organizational innovations the automaker pioneered—might help their own companies. During the past 20 years, lean has become, along with Six Sigma, one of two kinds of prominent performance-improvement programs adopted by global manufacturing and, more recently, service companies. Recently, organizations as diverse as steelmakers, insurance companies, and public-sector agencies have benefited from “leaning” their operations with Toyota’s now-classic approach: eliminating waste, variability, and inflexibility.

Yet in our experience, organizations overlook up to half of the potential savings when they implement or expand operational-improvement programs inspired by lean, Six Sigma, or both.1 Some companies set their sights too low; others falter by implementing lean and other performance-enhancing tools without recognizing how existing performance-management systems or employee mind-sets might undermine them. Still others underestimate the level of senior-management involvement required; for example, they delegate responsibility for change programs to their lean experts or Six Sigma black belts—practitioners who are technically skilled but often lack the authority, capabilities, or numbers to make change stick.
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Why Leadership is Not About Having All the Answers

Why Leadership is Not About Having All the Answers | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“If you think as a leader you can and should have all the answers, then you’re both wrong and significantly constraining the capacity of the organization to be creative.”
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Adam Galinsky: How to speak up for yourself | TED Talk

Adam Galinsky: How to speak up for yourself | TED Talk | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Speaking up is hard to do, even when you know you should. Learn how to assert yourself, navigate tricky social situations and expand your personal power with sage guidance from social psychologist Adam Galinsky.
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How Toxic Is Your Workplace Exactly? Quite Toxic if These 8 Things Keep Happening Every Day

How Toxic Is Your Workplace Exactly? Quite Toxic if These 8 Things Keep Happening Every Day | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
According to UNC Keenan-Flagler Business School, it is estimated that toxic workplaces cost U.S. employers $23.8 billion annually in the form of absenteeism, health care costs, lost productivity, and more.

A company's most valuable asset--its people--is rendered incapable to perform at a high level because most are too distracted by people trying to sabotage and manipulate the work environment.

If you work in such a place, most likely you've encountered these eight toxic work behaviors. 
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What My 13-Year Old Taught Me About Being Trustworthy | Thrive Global

What My 13-Year Old Taught Me About Being Trustworthy | Thrive Global | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Lessons in leadership trustworthiness. Gain insight into the impact of being trustworthy.
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WorkdayVoice: Workday Joins Sovrin Foundation, a Blockchain Standards Organization

WorkdayVoice: Workday Joins Sovrin Foundation, a Blockchain Standards Organization | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Organizations often sort employees into categories such as A, B, and C players. They also identify “high potentials," referred to as “hi-po’s," for investment in leadership effectiveness coaching and development programs.

Does your organization have a “hi-po” program? Have you been identified for development? If yes, good for you! I have ideas on how to maximize the benefit of any leadership development and coaching program your company may provide.

However, in this post, I want to focus on strategies for developing leadership skills for those who may not have an opportunity for a formal program, either because there isn't a budget for one or because they have been passed over for one reason or another.
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The Hidden Powers Of Effective Mentoring

The Hidden Powers Of Effective Mentoring | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Over the years, I have had the privilege of being an advisor, coach, and mentor to some of the most talented individuals. Through my extensive global diversity and business acumen, I have discovered the real power of successful mentoring comes from creating a deep connection and trust with my mentees.

Despite a very hectic travel schedule due to my international consulting and coaching practice, I find meaning in giving back in a tangible way. For this reason, I have accepted opportunities to mentor a number of people, handpicked for their drive toward professional development. I simply could not say no to individuals hungry to grow their skills and develop talent in specific areas of their lives.
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The Four Team Toxins

The Four Team Toxins | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The chances are that at some point in your professional life you will have experienced the dynamics of being both a leader and a team player. Each of us is both an accomplished individual and a part of complex systems such as our families, communities, and the organisation we work for. Navigating the complex web of relationship dynamics that exist within teams and organisations can be like walking through a minefield and is often a challenge for even the most experienced leaders and managers.

These systems are like spider webs, touch one strand and the whole structure feels the effects. This can be unsettling for even the most experienced leaders and managers. We do great work with one individual or team member only to find it has an unintended impact on another team member, or another team/department with the organisation. Reducing negative interactions within teams and organisations can have a powerful impact and help to strengthen this complex web and improve working relationships between departments, teams and team members.

The Four Team Toxins
John Gottman PhD is an internationally renowned relationship expert and best-selling author. In his research (see references), he has identified certain kinds of negativity that are so lethal to relationships he refers to them as the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. They are equally relevant to professional relationships. When we work with organisations and teams we refer to them as the Four Team Toxins.
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Are You Working Too Hard On Yourself?

Are You Working Too Hard On Yourself? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Go Easy

I’ve recently noticed that hardly a day goes by when I’m not thinking about or doing something to improve my life. It can be anything from researching new kitty litter to building a B&B in Hawaii just so I can have fresh papaya every day. It hardly ever stops—unless I’m dealing with the problem du jour—and I’ve decided it’s time to take a break from pushing myself. Makes me wonder if trying to do all this growth work hasn’t made me shrink in other ways. 

I only bring this up because, back in the day, we used to call people who went to every workshop around “self-development junkies.” I don’t need a workshop, because my own head takes me there—the funny part is I used to lead those workshops, and I was so into it. Now it’s a much different story. My goals have changed, and a peaceful life is more attractive than ever. One does not always have to be growing to be green and fruitful.
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What Is an Obliger?

We’ve long been intrigued by the work of personal well-being expert Gretchen Rubin, author of blockbuster best-seller The Happiness Project. But it wasn’t until we stumbled upon her book The Four Tendencies that we gained essential insight into our entire way of being, you guys. 

In her book, Rubin breaks down humankind into four distinct categories, determined by how we answer the question, “How do I respond to expectations?” And there are two types of expectations, she clarifies: External (work deadlines, Tax Day) and Internal (New Year’s resolutions, self-care, etc.). The respondent categories are Upholders, Questioners, Obligers and Rebels. There’s even a handy quiz to determine which one you are. But if you’re anything like us, you’ll know instantly if you’re an Obliger. No quiz necessary. 

It also probably won’t surprise you to learn that out of all four categories, Obligers are likeliest to feel overwhelmed and dissatisfied. Explains Jennifer Liu of LearnVest: “Obligers are most likely to put others’ needs ahead of their own, which can make them feel unfulfilled in their work—a leading cause of burnout.” The good news—sort of? “Obligers excel at meeting external demands and deadlines, and go to great lengths to meet their responsibilities, so they make terrific colleagues, family members, and friends,” writes Rubin. “Others rely on them tremendously.” Just don’t count on them to treat themselves with the same respect. “Obligers take their commitments to other people seriously, but generally let themselves down,” writes Rubin. “Obligers meet outer expectations, but struggle to meet inner expectations. They’re motivated by external accountability; they wake up and think, What must I do today?”
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Why leadership-development programs fail | McKinsey & Company

Why leadership-development programs fail | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Sidestepping four common mistakes can help companies develop stronger and more capable leaders, save time and money, and boost morale.

For years, organizations have lavished time and money on improving the capabilities of managers and on nurturing new leaders. US companies alone spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development.1 Colleges and universities offer hundreds of degree courses on leadership, and the cost of customized leadership-development offerings from a top business school can reach $150,000 a person.

Moreover, when upward of 500 executives were asked to rank their top three human-capital priorities, leadership development was included as both a current and a future priority. Almost two-thirds of the respondents identified leadership development as their number-one concern.2 Only 7 percent of senior managers polled by a UK business school think that their companies develop global leaders effectively,3 and around 30 percent of US companies admit that they have failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully because they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.4
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A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey & Company

A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In today’s tough and fast-changing environment, CEOs must help their top leaders to work through fear and denial and to learn new rules.

When business conditions change as dramatically as they have in the past year, CEOs need to be able to rely on their best leaders to adapt quickly. But what should they do when their strongest executives seem unable to play a new game? The costs—organizational drift, missed opportunities, unaddressed threats—are so big that it’s tempting to replace leaders who are suffering from paralysis. But this is a mistake when, as is often the case, these executives possess valuable assets, such as superior market knowledge, relationships, and organizational savvy, that are difficult to replace.

Before sending promising executives off the field, CEOs should try to help them learn to play by new rules. While part of the task—making a compelling case for change, helping him or her meet new job demands—involves appealing to an executive’s rational side, there’s also frequently an emotional element that is at least as important. Empathizing with the complex emotions executives may be feeling as the assumptions underlying their business approach unravel can be a critical part of overcoming the fear, denial, and learning blocks keeping them stuck (see sidebar, “CEOs, tough times, and emotions”).
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McKinsey Classics: The 'soft' side of change

McKinsey Classics: The 'soft' side of change | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Making operational change stick is hard. Operations typically account for the largest number of employees in a business, with the widest variation in skill levels, and units are often scattered throughout the world, function independently, and have distinct corporate cultures. That’s why many companies take the technical aspects of change programs much more seriously than the organizational ones. Technical issues seem objective and straightforward, lean tool kits teem with analytical solutions to operational problems, and organizations have invested significant amounts of money in training experts to apply them. What’s more, companies actually do need these solutions, tools, and experts to diagnose and improve their operational performance.


But they also need the “soft,” organizational elements of change: for instance, leaders who help their teams to identify and make efficiency improvements, a boardroom aligned with the shop floor, and the technical and interpersonal skills that make efficiency benefits real and lasting. These advantages do not appear by magic. Learn how to balance the soft and “hard” elements of lean transformations—read our classic 2008 article “From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick.”

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Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s O.K.!) - The New York Times

Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s O.K.!) - The New York Times | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“We’re like family here.”

It’s a line that seems enshrined in the collective unconsciousness of American workers. We spend more than 2,000 hours per year with our co-workers, so it seems only natural that we should think of them as family. We celebrate birthdays together, honor anniversaries, hang out at happy hours … these people are like a second family. Right?

Not necessarily, says Alison Green, who runs the career advice blog Ask a Manager and whose latest book, which has the same title, published earlier this year.
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The Power of Listening in Helping People Change

The Power of Listening in Helping People Change | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Giving performance feedback is one of the most common ways managers help their subordinates learn and improve. Yet, research revealed that feedback could actually hurt performance: More than 20 years ago, one of us (Kluger) analyzed 607 experiments on feedback effectiveness and found that feedback caused performance to decline in 38% of cases. This happened with both positive and negative feedback, mostly when the feedback threatened how people saw themselves.

One reason that giving feedback (even when it’s positive) often backfires is because it signals that the boss is in charge and the boss is judgmental. This can make employees stressed and defensive, which makes it harder for them to see another person’s perspective. For example, employees can handle negative feedback by downplaying the importance of the person providing the feedback or the feedback itself. People may even reshape their social networks to avoid the feedback source in order to restore their self-esteem. In other words, they defend themselves by bolstering their attitudes against the person giving feedback.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 6, 4:29 PM

Fascinating research on giving feedback. From the article: 

 

Giving performance feedback is one of the most common ways managers help their subordinates learn and improve. Yet, research revealed that feedback could actually hurt performance: More than 20 years ago, one of us (Kluger) analyzed 607 experiments on feedback effectiveness and found that feedback caused performance to decline in 38% of cases. This happened with both positive and negative feedback, mostly when the feedback threatened how people saw themselves.

One reason that giving feedback (even when it’s positive) often backfires is because it signals that the boss is in charge and the boss is judgmental. This can make employees stressed and defensive, which makes it harder for them to see another person’s perspective. For example, employees can handle negative feedback by downplaying the importance of the person providing the feedback or the feedback itself. People may even reshape their social networks to avoid the feedback source in order to restore their self-esteem. In other words, they defend themselves by bolstering their attitudes against the person giving feedback.

 

Bottom line: listen more, talk less.

From my perspective: deliberately evoke stories, then really listen to them. Feedback comes last.

 

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, August 6, 4:30 PM
Thanks for this Steve!
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You’re Never Going to Be “Caught Up” at Work. Stop Feeling Guilty About It.

Most people I know have a to-do list so long that it’s not clear that there’s an end to it. Some tasks, even quite important ones, linger unfinished for a long time, and it’s easy to start feeling guilty or ashamed about what you have not yet completed.

People experience guilt and its close cousin shame when they have done something wrong.  Guilt is focused internally on the behavior someone has committed, while shame tends to involve feeling like you are a bad person, particularly in the context of bad behaviors that have become public knowledge.
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Want to be a better leader? Learn about yourself | 2018-07-17 | CUNA News

Want to be a better leader? Learn about yourself | 2018-07-17 | CUNA News | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

The journey to becoming an authentic and effective leader starts by taking a moment to learn about yourself, says Jamie Marsh, director of BBA Career Services at the University of Wisconsin School of Business.

“You must know yourself and what you’re made of to be an effective leader,” says Marsh, who addressed CUNA Management School Monday in Madison, Wis.

She says leaders need to look within to determine their “why,” goals, values, and emotional intelligence. With that self-knowledge, people are equipped to become authentic leaders.

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Beyond Budgeting - The Adaptive And Agile Management Model

Beyond Budgeting - The Adaptive And Agile Management Model | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Beyond Budgeting has now been around for twenty years. More and more companies across the world are embarking on a Beyond Budgeting journey, from global giants to smaller ones not yet strangled by corporate controls and bureaucracy, eager to protect their start-up agility as they grow.

The financial crisis ten years ago was a stark reminder for many that businesses need something more agile and responsive than what traditional management can offer, including budgeting – a management technology invented a hundred years ago under very different circumstances.

Lately, after years of trying to scale Agile, “Business Agility“ has (finally) become a hot topic. Beyond Budgeting has been on this end of agility all the way back when Agile was only a software development thing.
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If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It?

If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Almost every leader wants to make more time for strategic thinking. In one survey of 10,000 senior leaders, 97% of them said that being strategic was the leadership behavior most important to their organization’s success.

And yet in another study, a full 96% of the leaders surveyed said they lacked the time for strategic thinking. Of course, we’re all oppressed with meetings and overwhelmed with emails (an average of 126 per day, according to a Radicati Group analysis).

But leaders presumably could take at least some steps to prioritize what they claim to be an imperative. What could account for such a massive misalignment between their stated goals and their actions?
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Why Do We Undervalue Competent Management?

Why Do We Undervalue Competent Management? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

In MBA programs, students are taught that companies can’t expect to compete on the basis of internal managerial competencies because they’re just too easy to copy. Operational effectiveness—doing the same thing as other companies but doing it exceptionally well—is not a path to sustainable advantage in the competitive universe. To stay ahead, the thinking goes, a company must stake out a distinctive strategic position—doing something different than its rivals. This is what the C-suite should focus on, leaving middle and lower-level managers to handle the nuts and bolts of managing the organization and executing plans.

Michael Porter articulated the difference between strategy and operational effectiveness in his seminal 1996 HBR article, “What Is Strategy?” The article’s analysis of strategy and the strategist’s role is rightly influential, but our research shows that simple managerial competence is more important—and less imitable—than Porter argued.

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A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings

A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Meetings. We may not like them but they are an indispensable part of modern work life and they’re essential to getting things done. To transform meetings from a slog into a structured opportunity to move things forward, you simply have to have a clear process for managing them properly.  Because meetings are a significant part of a CEO’s life, I’ve developed very clear rules and guidelines for meetings over the course of my over 40-year leadership journey. I’ve crafted these into a manifesto that adds discipline to ensure each meeting is as productive as possible.  Importantly, I tell my direct reports these expectations for meetings the very first hour of the first day we work together, when I “Declare Myself” – a practice I’ve developed to take the mystery out of working relationships and hit the ground running (you can learn more about the “Declaring Yourself” practice here).

To be clear, you don’t have to use these exact rules. But they’re offered as an example that can help you craft your own clear and organized approach to meetings.

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Introvert or Extrovert? Here's How to Boost Your Productivity

Why our personality types affect the way we work
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