IT and Leadership
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How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Don, a senior vice president for sales at a global manufacturing company, wakes up late, scrambles to get showered and dressed, has an argument with his teenage daughter over breakfast, then gets stuck in traffic on the way to work and realizes he will be late for his first meeting.

Donna, a marketing executive, wakes at 6 for a quick spin on the exercise bike, takes a moment to stretch and relax, then quickly gets herself ready, dresses and feeds her two kids before walking them to the bus, then catches the train to the office.

Which executive will have a more productive day at work?
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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False Hustle: How Keeping Busy Is Making You Less Productive

False Hustle: How Keeping Busy Is Making You Less Productive | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

It’s easy to be busy; it’s hard to be productive. Raise your hand if you’ve spent entire days answering “quick” email after “quick” email; spent hours in your task manager organizing your tasks for productivity; spent a half-day organizing tidying up old design files; or looked back on your week and realized you worked your ass off, but you’re not really sure what you actually accomplished.

Bad news, those with raised hands: you’re a victim of false hustle.

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New Report on Alternative Credentials and Pathways to Degrees

New Report on Alternative Credentials and Pathways to Degrees | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Inside Higher Ed's new report, "On-Ramps and Off-Ramps: Alternative Credentials and Emerging Pathways Between Education and Work," is an up-to-the-minute look at how colleges, companies and other players are reconsidering how to measure and recognize knowledge and skills.

The special report, Inside Higher Ed's second, assesses the fast-changing landscape of postsecondary education and training credentials, based on interviews with scores of higher education leaders, corporate officials, policy makers and other experts. Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed's news editor, explores a wide range of examples of new kinds of credentials at all stages of the postsecondary pipeline: apprenticeships and other noncollege preparation for entry-level jobs; new pathways designed to lead to four-year degrees; badges and other add-ons to the traditional bachelor's degree; and shorter, narrower credentials that could disrupt graduate education.
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The Decision Matrix: How to Prioritize What Matters

The Decision Matrix: How to Prioritize What Matters | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The decisions we spend the most time on are rarely the most important ones. Not all decisions need the same process. Sometimes, trying to impose the same process on all decisions leads to difficulty identifying which ones are most important, bogging us down and stressing us out.
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Make Sure Everyone on Your Team Sees Learning as Part of Their Job

Make Sure Everyone on Your Team Sees Learning as Part of Their Job | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
As an executive coach, I speak regularly at corporate leadership development programs. During discussions, participants often confess the real reason they’re in the room, and it’s rarely “to grow and learn.” Time and again, the reasons include: they are checking a box on their development plan, their manager told them to come, or they’ve been told that their participation will increase the chance of a promotion.
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Are You Making Your Employees Sick?

Are You Making Your Employees Sick? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Stress may be hard to quantify, but the negative effects it can have on a person’s health are undeniable. Symptoms related to being overstressed include headaches, muscle tension, fatigue, upset stomach, insomnia, anxiety, irritability, drug/alcohol abuse, and a wide range of other physical and mental health issues. If your company embraces a high-stress culture, you might be doing actual physical damage to your workers.

In fact, 36 percent of workers say their job has a negative impact on their physical health, according to a survey of 3,600 employees around the world conducted by O.C. Tanner. Thirty-eight percent of respondents also claimed their jobs made it difficult to be happy in other aspects of their life, and 52 percent felt confident that their employer cared more about productivity and the bottom line than employee well-being.

“Clearly, profitability and productivity are important key performance indicators and are critical to business success,” says Gary Beckstrand, vice president of the O.C. Tanner Institute and author of Appreciate: Celebrating People, Influencing Greatness. “However, if that’s the only message employees hear from senior leadership, employee engagement and the sense of overall well-being suffers.”
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To Find Meaning in Your Work, Change How You Think About It

To Find Meaning in Your Work, Change How You Think About It | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
A wonderful New York Times article from 2007 recounted the 20th annual “Operator’s Challenge” — aka the “Sludge Olympics” — a competition for New York sewage treatment workers. The participants compete to show skill in their work, and often do so with great passion. Emily Lloyd, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, said of the work the competitors do, “It’s tough work. It’s frequently unpleasant work. And they’re terrific at it.” And as you read the article, you note the pride the competitors have in their work and the purpose they find in doing it well. One man, George Mossos, noting how anonymous their work can be, is quoted saying, “It’s enough to serve the public.”

Why is it that some people can be extraordinarily well-paid and work in pampered settings but feel empty, while others can work in the sewers of New York City and feel fulfilled? Part of the answer is purpose.
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3 Ways Senior Leaders Create a Toxic Culture

3 Ways Senior Leaders Create a Toxic Culture | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Whether presiding over the entire company, a function, a region, or a business unit, the people at the top of an organization have a disproportionate level of influence over those they lead. Those further down in the organization look to their leaders for cues on what’s acceptable (and what isn’t), and the team’s habits — both good and bad — will be emulated. Having your actions play out publicly, as if on a Jumbotron, is a huge responsibility, and unfortunately too many teams don’t take this responsibility as seriously as they should. The consequences can be farther reaching than most leadership teams realize.

At their best, leadership teams synchronize their organizations into cohesive powerhouses. At their worst, they set an example that some of the worst habits will be tolerated — and perhaps even rewarded. In my 30 years of working with leadership teams, these are three habits that I’ve seen have the most negative influence over a company. Here’s my advice for how to fix them.
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What is gaslighting? And how do you know if it's happening to you?

What is gaslighting? And how do you know if it's happening to you? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

It’s an unfortunate reality that happens in personal relationships and by public figures to the peoples they serve.

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When to change how you lead | McKinsey & Company

When to change how you lead | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s fashionable to say we live in fast-changing times. Does that mean leadership itself must change?

Is leadership an immutable endeavor in which we learn as much from Alexander the Great and the Bhagavad Gita as from GM’s Mary Barra or Apple’s Tim Cook? Or does the role of the business leader change with the changing times? This ageless question formed the starting point for a wide-ranging discussion at a recent meeting of advisors to McKinsey’s Leadership Development Practice. The group included Helen Alexander, former CEO of The Economist Group; Robert Kegan, the developmental psychologist and author, from Harvard University; Nadir Mohamed, former CEO of Rogers Communications; and McKinsey partners Claudio Feser, Mary Meaney, and Tim Welsh. Quarterly editor in chief Allen Webb moderated the discussion. While conclusive answers may have been elusive, the conversation generated insights into a number of key aspects of leadership, including the effect of success on leaders, the benefits of failure in developing resilience, and the role of maturity and self-awareness.
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Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company

New research suggests that the secret to developing effective leaders is to encourage four types of behavior.

Telling CEOs these days that leadership drives performance is a bit like saying that oxygen is necessary to breathe. Over 90 percent of CEOs are already planning to increase investment in leadership development because they see it as the single most important human-capital issue their organizations face.1 And they’re right to do so: earlier McKinsey research has consistently shown that good leadership is a critical part of organizational health, which is an important driver of shareholder returns.2

A big, unresolved issue is what sort of leadership behavior organizations should encourage. Is leadership so contextual that it defies standard definitions or development approaches?3 Should companies now concentrate their efforts on priorities such as role modeling, making decisions quickly, defining visions, and shaping leaders who are good at adapting? Should they stress the virtues of enthusiastic communication? In the absence of any academic or practitioner consensus on the answers, leadership-development programs address an extraordinary range of issues, which may help explain why only 43 percent of CEOs are confident that their training investments will bear fruit.
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The agile manager | McKinsey & Company

The agile manager | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

The agile workplace is becoming increasingly common. In a McKinsey survey of more than 2,500 people across company sizes, functional specialties, industries, regions, and tenures, 37 percent of respondents said their organizations are carrying out company-wide agile transformations, and another 4 percent said their companies have fully implemented such transformations. The shift is driven by proof that small, multidisciplinary teams of agile organizations can respond swiftly and promptly to rapidly changing market opportunities and customer demands. Indeed, more than 80 percent of respondents in agile units report that overall performance increased moderately or significantly since their transformations began.

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From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick | McKinsey & Company

From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
By focusing on the “soft” side of lean and Six Sigma initiatives, leading global companies gain substantial, scalable, and sustainable advantages.

For companies seeking large-scale operational improvements, all roads lead to Toyota. Each year, thousands of executives tour its facilities to learn how lean production—the operational and organizational innovations the automaker pioneered—might help their own companies. During the past 20 years, lean has become, along with Six Sigma, one of two kinds of prominent performance-improvement programs adopted by global manufacturing and, more recently, service companies. Recently, organizations as diverse as steelmakers, insurance companies, and public-sector agencies have benefited from “leaning” their operations with Toyota’s now-classic approach: eliminating waste, variability, and inflexibility.

Yet in our experience, organizations overlook up to half of the potential savings when they implement or expand operational-improvement programs inspired by lean, Six Sigma, or both.1 Some companies set their sights too low; others falter by implementing lean and other performance-enhancing tools without recognizing how existing performance-management systems or employee mind-sets might undermine them. Still others underestimate the level of senior-management involvement required; for example, they delegate responsibility for change programs to their lean experts or Six Sigma black belts—practitioners who are technically skilled but often lack the authority, capabilities, or numbers to make change stick.
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Why Leadership is Not About Having All the Answers

Why Leadership is Not About Having All the Answers | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“If you think as a leader you can and should have all the answers, then you’re both wrong and significantly constraining the capacity of the organization to be creative.”
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When You Start a New Job, Pay Attention to These 5 Aspects of Company Culture

When You Start a New Job, Pay Attention to These 5 Aspects of Company Culture | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When you join an organization, you have a short window of time to adapt to its culture. It’s the old 90-day rule. And we know too many talented individuals who have stumbled in their new company because they failed to read the cultural tea leaves. This happens because most organizations don’t explain the cultural rules to newcomers, and new hires are so focused on the job and the new boss that they overlook the rules’ profound influence. Yet understanding them plays a big role in your initial success. Being cognizant of not just what your colleagues do but how they work matters if you want to be effective and be perceived well.
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4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves

4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
You’ve left an important task undone for weeks. It’s hanging over you, causing daily anxiety. And yet instead of actually doing it, you do a hundred other tasks instead.
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The five types of mentors you need in your life |

The five types of mentors you need in your life | | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Here’s how to assemble your personal dream team, with tips from business expert Anthony Tjan.
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Leaders with Heart Don’t Take Their Own Leadership for Granted

Leaders with Heart Don’t Take Their Own Leadership for Granted | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Compeat CMO, Kristi Turner, sat down with Heather R. Younger, J.D., Founder, Customer Fanatix, LLC, for a podcast called  “Leaders with Heart Don’t Take Their Own Leadership for Granted.”  In the interview, Kristi shares some of the powerful insights that she has gained over the years as she worked her way up from the bottom into leadership.

Kristi sums up how she held strong to her beliefs stayed true to her values while learning valuable lessons from both the best leaders and the worst leaders along the way.  Here are just a few of the valuable insights Kristi shares in the podcast that restaurant operators and managers can use in their own leadership journey.
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How to respond to passive-aggressive emails

How to respond to passive-aggressive emails | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
If that snippy coworker is being passive-aggressive in an email (again!), resist the urge to send an equally snarly response.

"The goal of the passive-aggressive person is to get someone else to visibly act out the anger that they have been concealing," social worker Signe Whitson, author of "The Angry Smile," told Business Insider. "Any time their covertly hostile email is responded to with overt hostility, the passive aggressive person succeeds."

Don't fight fire with fire. If you do, you're just falling into the passive-aggressive person's trap.
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Dataset Search: Google launches new search engine to help scientists find datasets

Dataset Search: Google launches new search engine to help scientists find datasets | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Google’s goal has always been to organize the world’s information, and its first target was the commercial web. Now, it wants to do the same for the scientific community with a new search engine for datasets.

The service, called Dataset Search, launches today, and will be a companion of sorts to Google Scholar, the company’s popular search engine for academic studies and reports. Institutions that publish their data online, like universities and governments, will need to include metadata tags in their webpages that describe their data, including who created it, when it was published, how it was collected, and so on. This information will then be indexed by Dataset Search and combined with input from Google’s Knowledge Graph. (That’s the name for those boxes that pop up for common searches. So if dataset X was published by CERN, some info about the institute will also be included in the results.)
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“Teaching is the profession on which all other professions depend”: Linda Darling-Hammond on transforming education

“Teaching is the profession on which all other professions depend”: Linda Darling-Hammond on transforming education | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
On this episode of School’s In, Linda Darling-Hammond shares her top-five list of ways to change education in America
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6 Steps to Improve Your Emotional Intelligence | Ramona Hacker | TEDxTUM - YouTube

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Why leadership-development programs fail | McKinsey & Company

Why leadership-development programs fail | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Sidestepping four common mistakes can help companies develop stronger and more capable leaders, save time and money, and boost morale.

For years, organizations have lavished time and money on improving the capabilities of managers and on nurturing new leaders. US companies alone spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development.1 Colleges and universities offer hundreds of degree courses on leadership, and the cost of customized leadership-development offerings from a top business school can reach $150,000 a person.

Moreover, when upward of 500 executives were asked to rank their top three human-capital priorities, leadership development was included as both a current and a future priority. Almost two-thirds of the respondents identified leadership development as their number-one concern.2 Only 7 percent of senior managers polled by a UK business school think that their companies develop global leaders effectively,3 and around 30 percent of US companies admit that they have failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully because they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.4
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A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey & Company

A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey & Company | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In today’s tough and fast-changing environment, CEOs must help their top leaders to work through fear and denial and to learn new rules.

When business conditions change as dramatically as they have in the past year, CEOs need to be able to rely on their best leaders to adapt quickly. But what should they do when their strongest executives seem unable to play a new game? The costs—organizational drift, missed opportunities, unaddressed threats—are so big that it’s tempting to replace leaders who are suffering from paralysis. But this is a mistake when, as is often the case, these executives possess valuable assets, such as superior market knowledge, relationships, and organizational savvy, that are difficult to replace.

Before sending promising executives off the field, CEOs should try to help them learn to play by new rules. While part of the task—making a compelling case for change, helping him or her meet new job demands—involves appealing to an executive’s rational side, there’s also frequently an emotional element that is at least as important. Empathizing with the complex emotions executives may be feeling as the assumptions underlying their business approach unravel can be a critical part of overcoming the fear, denial, and learning blocks keeping them stuck (see sidebar, “CEOs, tough times, and emotions”).
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McKinsey Classics: The 'soft' side of change

McKinsey Classics: The 'soft' side of change | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Making operational change stick is hard. Operations typically account for the largest number of employees in a business, with the widest variation in skill levels, and units are often scattered throughout the world, function independently, and have distinct corporate cultures. That’s why many companies take the technical aspects of change programs much more seriously than the organizational ones. Technical issues seem objective and straightforward, lean tool kits teem with analytical solutions to operational problems, and organizations have invested significant amounts of money in training experts to apply them. What’s more, companies actually do need these solutions, tools, and experts to diagnose and improve their operational performance.


But they also need the “soft,” organizational elements of change: for instance, leaders who help their teams to identify and make efficiency improvements, a boardroom aligned with the shop floor, and the technical and interpersonal skills that make efficiency benefits real and lasting. These advantages do not appear by magic. Learn how to balance the soft and “hard” elements of lean transformations—read our classic 2008 article “From lean to lasting: Making operational improvements stick.”

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Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s O.K.!) - The New York Times

Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s O.K.!) - The New York Times | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“We’re like family here.”

It’s a line that seems enshrined in the collective unconsciousness of American workers. We spend more than 2,000 hours per year with our co-workers, so it seems only natural that we should think of them as family. We celebrate birthdays together, honor anniversaries, hang out at happy hours … these people are like a second family. Right?

Not necessarily, says Alison Green, who runs the career advice blog Ask a Manager and whose latest book, which has the same title, published earlier this year.
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