IT and Leadership
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Why work doesn't happen at work

Why work doesn't happen at work | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn't a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems (call them the M&Ms) and offers three suggestions to make work work.

(Filmed at TEDxMidWest.)
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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Half of Employees Don’t Feel Respected by Their Bosses

Half of Employees Don’t Feel Respected by Their Bosses | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

When it comes to garnering commitment and engagement from employees, there is one thing that leaders need to demonstrate: Respect. That’s what we saw in a study of nearly 20,000 employees around the world (conducted with HBR and Tony Schwartz).

In fact, no other leader behavior had a bigger effect on employees across the outcomes we measured. Being treated with respect was more important to employees than recognition and appreciation, communicating an inspiring vision, providing useful feedback — even opportunities for learning, growth, and development.
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The Leader’s Calendar

The Leader’s Calendar | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

A related question is how CEOs spend their days, something we’ve historically known very little about on a granular level — until now. In “How CEOs Manage Time,” Michael Porter and Nitin Nohria analyze remarkable data from the calendars of 27 leaders of large companies. They note that a CEO’s schedule is essentially a manifestation of how they lead, and that it sends powerful messages to the rest of the organization. It’s astonishing if you think about it: Every calendar decision can enhance or diminish a leader’s legitimacy. 

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Traditional Teaching May Deepen Inequality. Can a Different Approach Fix It?

Traditional Teaching May Deepen Inequality. Can a Different Approach Fix It? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Kelly A. Hogan had no reason to think anything was wrong with her teaching. She had been hired at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as part of a push to bring in teaching-oriented professors who would improve undergraduate education. And, on the face of it, Hogan was delivering on expectations: She received glowing course evaluations from students, who complimented her teaching style.

Then, about a decade ago, a colleague who was researching large courses, including Biology 101, for which Hogan taught half of the sections, shared some troubling data: About one in 14 white students earned a D or F in the course. About one in seven Latino/a students received those grades. For black students, it was one in three.

For Hogan, seeing the data felt "like a punch in the gut." To make matters worse, she knew that introductory biology, which she taught to majors and nonmajors alike, was a gateway course. Students who got a D or an F in it were awfully unlikely to continue in STEM fields. Suddenly the underrepresentation of minorities in the sciences wasn’t some far-off phenomenon. It was something her own biology course, which she had labored over and taught to some 3,000 students by that point, was contributing to.

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Avoid these digital transformation false starts

Avoid these digital transformation false starts | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Congratulations! You’ve just been hired as the CIO of a large global company that is in dire need of digital transformation. For your new company to thrive in the digital economy, everything must change: business model, technology, and culture. Your CEO needs you to drive this digital transformation now. There is no time to waste!

Bruce Lee, who has held CIO roles at BNP Paribas, HSBC Securities, NYSE Euronext, and Fannie Mae, applauds your bias for action, but he suggests you take a minute to think things through.

“We are so focused on the ultimate destination of digital transformation — good data and customer centricity — that we do not always focus enough on the starting point,” says Lee. “When CIOs do not truly understand their current state, they automate the wrong processes, deliver capabilities that no one wants, and lose their team along the way.”
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How deadlines thwart our ability to do important work (and what we can do about it) - The

How deadlines thwart our ability to do important work (and what we can do about it) - The | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Suppose you have two tasks before you.

One isn’t that important but needs to be done quickly. The other is important but isn’t urgent.

Often, people will choose against their self-interest to do the urgent but less important task, a new study has demonstrated. What’s more, the busier and more overwhelmed you feel, the more likely you are to pick the urgent task.

The study, published recently in the Journal of Consumer Research, confirms some of our worst fears: We are often horrible at setting and following priorities, and the modern world is only making the problem worse.
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How Academe Breeds Resentment

How Academe Breeds Resentment | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

There is a growing folder on my office desk. On the front, in large, black print, is the word "RESENTMENT." Students stopping by during office hours eye the folder with anxiety. No worries, I tell them, it’s strictly research. Yet when my colleagues have stopped by and seen the folder, I see little anxiety. Quite the opposite: I get knowing smiles. And when I talk about my research on resentment with colleagues at other institutions, I’m eagerly met with stories.


A member of my graduate cohort could not apply for a job because her dissertation committee’s director had a "row" with the head of the search committee there — 20 years ago. An emeritus professor told me she refused to speak at meetings because newer faculty members interrupted her, a sure sign of disrespect. A friend at another university insists that his sabbatical was denied because his humanities research was seen as "frivolous" by a jury of science professors. What impresses me about these stories is their specificity: There is a cause — an injustice — and an effect — a feeling of resentment.

Why in the world do my colleagues react so knowingly? And why are the stories they share not about love gone awry or a politician’s latest outrageous statement, but about the mundane minutiae of everyday academic life? What is it about academe that makes us such experts of resentment?

Perhaps resentment is embedded in the matrix of academia. The philosopher Robert C. Solomon wryly noted, in his book The Passions, that "resentful people make excellent guards, police, librarians, school disciplinarians, clerks, detectives, scholars, and babysitters." What these professions have in common is how they look at their subject. Guards and police watch for suspicious behavior; detectives accusingly question witnesses; scholars "interrogate" the subject of their study. As Solomon suggests, resentment plays out in both universal and particular ways. Resentful people seek others to resent; they never miss the minutiae of a single, resentment-propelling detail.

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How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None

How to Gain Power at Work When You Have None | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
How do you gain power when you have none?

More employers are opening new paths to leadership by encouraging employees to develop spheres of influence that have nothing to do with the org chart.

Such informal power is increasingly important—and valued—in today’s flatter organizations, where more jobs confer responsibility for teammates’ performance without the authority to give orders or dish out rewards or punishment, says corporate trainer Dana Brownlee, of Atlanta.

Specific behaviors can predict informal power, and many of them can be learned, she says. Networking across departments, building expertise in new areas and cultivating charisma are all ways to gain power, and make you a go-to person for colleagues.

People who build strong networks ask lots of questions of colleagues, show respect for co-workers’ roles and accomplishments, and look for openings to help with projects that excite them, according to a 2017 study of 20 employers and 160 managers co-written by Robert Cross, a professor of global leadership at Babson College in Massachusetts. “These people create enthusiasm in the networks around them,” making colleagues more likely to offer them new opportunities, says Dr. Cross, who heads a 70-employer consortium studying collaboration. “I call them energizers.”
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The Brain Science Is In: Students' Emotional Needs Matter

Among policy elites and pundits in education, the urgency to improve academic achievement has stoked a raging debate. On one side are those who prioritize rigorous cognitive and academic development; on the other, those who care most about students’ noncognitive skills and the physical, social, and emotional needs of the whole child. To many teachers, the debate seems ridiculous—because they have long known the answer is “both.” Now, science is on their side.

Teachers, like parents, have always understood that children’s learning and growth do not occur in a vacuum, but instead at the messy intersection of academic, social, and emotional development. And they know that students’ learning is helped (or hindered) by the quality of students’ relationships and the contexts in which they live and learn. Working to weave those threads, skilled teachers often have yearned for schools—and policy approaches—that understand this complex reality.
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Colleges Struggle To Attract Students

Colleges Struggle To Attract Students | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Fewer high school graduates and an improving economy are pushing college enrollment down. Wisconsin was one of 34 states where 2018 spring enrollment declined, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center released on May 22.

The drop is across the board — at all degree granting institutions — and was most severe in the Midwest and northeast.

Wisconsin’s enrollment dropped 1.4 percent from 2017. Minnesota’s decline was even greater: just more than 3 percent.

Four-year, for-profit schools popular during the Great Recession saw the biggest drop. Two-year public colleges were also hit hard.

Overall, University of Wisconsin Colleges have seen a 32 percent decline in full-time student enrollment since 2010. At some campuses the decline has exceeded 50 percent, according to UW System Interim Director of Communications Heather LaRoi.
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How Humble Leadership Really Works

How Humble Leadership Really Works | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When you’re a leader — no matter how long you’ve been in your role or how hard the journey was to get there — you are merely overhead unless you’re bringing out the best in your employees. Unfortunately, many leaders lose sight of this.

Power, as my colleague Ena Inesi has studied, can cause leaders to become overly obsessed with outcomes and control, and, therefore, treat their employees as means to an end. As I’ve discovered in my own research, this ramps up people’s fear — fear of not hitting targets, fear of losing bonuses, fear of failing — and as a consequence people stop feeling positive emotions and their drive to experiment and learn is stifled.

Via David Hain, Stewart-Marshall, Roger Francis
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David Hain's curator insight, May 29, 3:54 AM

A plea for a leadership approach that's more human, because power notions can be illusory, and hubris is never far away...

John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, May 30, 7:15 AM

Top-down leadership is outdated, and, more importantly, counterproductive. By focusing too much on control and end goals, and not enough on their people, leaders are making it more difficult to achieve their own desired outcomes.

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How Our Obsession With College Prep Hurts Kids

How Our Obsession With College Prep Hurts Kids | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
M ost schools say they’re preparing children for college and a career. Ted Dintersmith argues that today’s K-12 education is preparation for neither.

What the system is doing instead, says the education reformer, philanthropist, and retired venture capitalist, is training kids to apply to college, mainly by having them study certain subjects and regurgitate facts and equations on standardized tests. And that kind of learning is useless for career development, he says, when the work world is about to be dominated by machines that can spit out information in microseconds.

Consider calculus and statistics: Colleges want to see the former on an applicant’s transcript, because it’s difficult and serves to rank and weed out students. But few people use calculus in their jobs. Knowledge of statistics, on the other hand, is crucial to many emerging careers, not to mention one’s own life.
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What the 21st-Century Library Looks Like

What the 21st-Century Library Looks Like | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When DePaul University opened its new library in 1992, the information ecosystem was on the precipice of change. The internet was becoming mainstream and, with it, libraries’ role in providing access to information was crumbling.

Two and a half decades later, DePaul’s John T. Richardson Library looks the same from the outside. But when visitors walk through its tall-ceilinged hallway and onto the first floor, they enter a space that’s clearly adapted to the digital age.
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Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?

Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s possible to fake emotional intelligence. Similar to knockoffs of luxury watches or handbags, there are emotions and actions that look like the real thing but really aren’t. With the best of intentions, I’ve seen smart leaders charge into sensitive interactions armed with what they believed was a combination of deep empathy, attuned listening, and self-awareness but was, in fact, a way to serve their own emotional needs. It’s important to learn to spot these forgeries, especially if you’re the forger.
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Do Your Employees Feel Respected?

Do Your Employees Feel Respected? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

But it’s not just what we spend our time doing that makes work meaningful (or not); it’s how we treat others, too. Workers say that respect is one of the most important factors in whether they enjoy a job, yet many report experiencing uncivil behavior. In “Do Your Employees Feel Respected?” Kristie Rogers explains that addressing this problem starts with recognizing that there are two distinct types of respect: owed respect, which is given equally to all members of an organization, and earned respect, which recognizes individuals for their contributions and behaviors.

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Collaboration Without Burnout

Collaboration Without Burnout | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Here’s a startling stat: Most managers spend upwards of 85% of their workday on email, in meetings, and on the phone. As a result, too many of us have gotten into the habit of collaborating with others during the day and getting our own tasks done on nights and weekends. In “Collaboration Without Burnout,” Rob Cross, Scott Taylor, and Deb Zehner show that there’s a much better way. They offer strategies for making smarter choices about working with others — and for clawing back enough precious time to deal with your own work during office hours. 

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Five Ways to Get Young Recruits to Embrace Emotional Intelligence

Five Ways to Get Young Recruits to Embrace Emotional Intelligence | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Another school year is ending, and offices around the world will soon be getting an influx of new recruits with fresh ideas, an eagerness to work and, often, a sense that they know everything.

If you’re a leader, you will have to overcome that know-it-all-ness pretty quickly to teach your new recruits any technical skills and policies important to the job. But it may be even more critical to get past that to develop the emotional intelligence (EI) skills, competencies that younger workers may not understand the value of in the workplace, let alone over the course of their own careers. Indeed, research suggests that it’s Millennials who underrate it the most, even as seasoned managers increasingly acknowledge how crucial emotional intelligence is for effectiveness, particularly in leadership.
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Why Male Mentors in the #MeToo Era Must ‘Engage More, Not Run for the Hills’

Why Male Mentors in the #MeToo Era Must ‘Engage More, Not Run for the Hills’ | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
At a time of heightened awareness about sexual harassment, senior men are shying away from mentoring young women. That’s a step in the wrong direction.
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Rooting Out Jerks Is More Important Than Hiring Superstars, New Study Shows  

Rooting Out Jerks Is More Important Than Hiring Superstars, New Study Shows   | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
You probably don't need much convincing that working with jerks is unpleasant. Personal experience is enough to convince most of us that bullies, liars, and manipulators make miserable colleagues. Research even shows their bad behavior is contagious. But if you're the type that likes data to back up every hunch, a new working paper out of Harvard Business School has put some eye-popping numbers to the cost of tolerating jerks.
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To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To

To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the best insights on what true productivity means in the 21st century dates back to 1890. In his book The Principles of Psychology, Vol.1, William James wrote a simple statement that’s packed with meaning: “My experience is what I agree to attend to.”

Your attention determines the experiences you have, and the experiences you have determine the life you live. Or said another way: you must control your attention to control your life. Today, in a world where so many experiences are blended together — where we can work from home (or a train or a plane or a beach), watch our kids on a nanny-cam from work, and distraction is always just a thumb-swipe away — has that ever been more true?
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How Can a Student Be ‘Proficient’ in One State But Not Another? Here Are the Graphs | EdSurge News

When No Child Left Behind passed back in 2002, Congress enthusiastically proclaimed that 100 percent of American students would be proficient in reading and math by 2014. What they didn’t expect was that some states would significantly lower the bar for proficiency to avoid being marked as failing or losing special funding from the federal government.

Today, much of the shucking and jiving around setting standards and defining proficiency at the state level has not changed, meaning fourth-grade students in Louisiana can be held to a much lower reading and math proficiency standard than students in New York. However, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), an organization that has been mapping proficiency standards for 15 years, says the gap between how states define proficiency is narrowing.

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Constructive Feedback Should Always Be a Discussion

Constructive Feedback Should Always Be a Discussion | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
For managers, providing feedback can be daunting— especially when that feedback isn’t entirely positive. Plenty of managers avoid giving critical feedback for reasons ranging from a fear that it’ll upset the employee, to being afraid to affect a seemingly positive workplace culture, to even not knowing how. But providing that kind of  feedback is necessary for both the achievement of company goals, and for personal development.
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The working dead: IT jobs bound for extinction

The working dead: IT jobs bound for extinction | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Rapid shifts in technologies—and evolving business needs—make career reinvention a matter of survival in the IT industry.
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Followership: Avoid being a toxic subordinate

Followership: Avoid being a toxic subordinate | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
According to the author, "toxic subordinate" is not part of the Army lexicon but ought to have an equal place when discussing leadership and organizational value because every leader is a follower.

Via george_reed
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george_reed's curator insight, May 30, 1:06 PM

An excellent contribution that looks at toxic followers from a military perspective. We should ask ourselves, "Am I making the job of my supervisor more, or less, of a burden."

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Change Your Habits, Change Your Life

Change Your Habits, Change Your Life | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In her book Better Than Before, author Gretchen Rubin poses the critical question: How do we change?

Her answer? Through habits, the invisible architecture of everyday life. It takes work to make a habit, but once that habit is set, we can harness the energy of habits to build happier, stronger, more productive lives.

So how do we instill good habits into our routine and banish the destructive ones? It turns out that overcoming a penchant for acting impulsively is not only possible, it’s the best way to build the better habits you’ve been longing for.
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How to Cultivate Gratitude, Compassion, and Pride on Your Team

How to Cultivate Gratitude, Compassion, and Pride on Your Team | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, what traits should you cultivate in your employees? Grit – the ability to persevere in the face of challenges? Sure. A willingness to accept some sacrifices and work hard toward a successful future are essential for the members of any team. But I believe there’s another component that matters just as much: grace. I don’t mean the ability to move elegantly or anything religious. Rather, I mean qualities of decency, respect, and generosity, all of which mark a person as someone with whom others want to cooperate.
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