IT and Leadership
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4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization

4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Improving IT value realization is clearly top of mind for many executives these days. Sadly, IT value realization is more of a focus among CEO's and CFO's tha
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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10 issues that will shape 2019 for higher-ed IT leaders

10 issues that will shape 2019 for higher-ed IT leaders | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Information security strategy is EDUCAUSE‘s No. 1 IT issue for 2019, topping the list for a fourth consecutive year. The top 10 issues were previewed at EDUCAUSE 2018.

Privacy, along with the notion of the integrative CIO, make their first appearance on the list of trends and issues that are forecasted to dominate higher-ed IT leaders’ priorities in 2019.

The 10 issues fall under three general themes: the notion of the data-enabled institution; funding, including sustainable funding and higher-ed affordability; and IT as an institutional leader and change agent.

Led by Susan Grajek, vice president of communities and research for EDUCAUSE, panelists included John Campbell, vice provost at West Virginia University; Merri Lavagnino, director of strategic planning and enterprise risk at Indiana University; Loretta Early, chief information officer at the George Washington University; Joel Hartman, vice president and CIO at the University of Central Florida; and Carlos Morales, president of the TCC Connect Campus in the Tarrant County College District.
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Use These Five Top Rules To Become The Boss Your Employees Dream About

Use These Five Top Rules To Become The Boss Your Employees Dream About | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
You do not need to manage a team of 100 people, in order to start working on your leadership style. No matter if your team is huge or incredibly small, you will always get the best performance and achieve highest results if you ensure that your substance, style, and service as a boss is helping you to lead an autonomous and empowered group of successful people doing a successful job. In the frenetic natural tendency to overcome the so-called "impostor syndrome" while getting to achieve greater power and glory, managers often envision their team solely as a supportive pillar necessary to help them to scale up their results. Too rarely, they realize that the people they manage can be a powerful ecosystem with independent life and potential to be unleashed. Empowered and autonomous ecosystems could bring it much further than expected in the business plan.

The role of a good boss is to provide for the team and to grant to its members the proper conditions to work while developing their own competencies and characters in a successful symbiosis of great results and great individual professional and personal development. Good managers combine both competence and character. Yet, the exceptional ones are also caring. In his book Give and Take, Adam Grant explains how giving is clearly a gift that gives back again and again. Through his work, Grant is proving how self-interest and other-interest are completely independent motivations. This actually means that searching for your own success while ensuring others success are simply complementary and not contradictory attitudes reinforcing one each other.
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3 Common Traps New Leaders Should Avoid

3 Common Traps New Leaders Should Avoid | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
For young workers, moving into a leadership role is an exciting and fulfilling step, but not without its share of complications. Whether managing distractions or delivering valuable feedback, new leaders can feel overwhelmed by the demands of their new position.
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Motivating Your Most Creative Employees

Motivating Your Most Creative Employees | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In any team or organization, some individuals are consistently more likely to come up with ideas that are both novel and useful. These ideas are the seeds of innovation: the intellectual foundation for any new products and services that enable some organizations to gain a competitive advantage over others. However, organizations are often unable to put in place the right processes, leadership, and culture to turn creative ideas into actual innovations, which causes even their most creative employees to underperform. This mismanagement of innovation is further exacerbated by the fact that managing creatives tend to require special attention and consideration. Indeed, decades of psychological research suggests that creative people are quite different from others when it comes to personality, values, and abilities. In light of that, here are eight evidence-based recommendations to get the most out of your creative employees and to stop them from underperforming
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9 Simple Ways You Can Make Your Employees Happy - | Leadership

9 Simple Ways You Can Make Your Employees Happy -  | Leadership | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Most leaders agree that employee attitude is a key factor in an organization’s success. Whether your employees are fulfilled and motivated or frustrated and disengaged is largely up to you.

To keep employees fulfilled, productive, and engaged–and reduce the expense and disruption of turnover–make sure you’re incorporating these nine principles into your leadership every day.
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DevOps requires dumping old IT leadership ideas | The Enterprisers Project

DevOps requires dumping old IT leadership ideas | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Some IT leaders see DevOps and agile practices simply as a way to run their software projects. If you look at DevOps in this narrow way, you miss the deep implications for the way IT should be managed and led. Make no mistake: DevOps represents a different way of thinking about IT – and requires a different leadership model.

As noted in my new book A Seat at the Table: IT Leadership in the Age of Agility, four big concerns of the CIO—governance, risk management, build versus buy decisions, and enterprise architecture, get turned upside down in the DevOps and agile world. While the waterfall development world was about IT control of project delivery, the DevOps world is about collaboration across the business organization to achieve business objectives, using cross-functional teams with both business and technology skills.
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Can a Strengths Coaching Approach Be Damaging?

Can a Strengths Coaching Approach Be Damaging? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When it comes to using a coach to improve your performance at work, would you rather they focus on building your strengths or fixing your weaknesses? As the executive coaching industry continues to boom, so too has a strengths-focused approach to improving your performance on the job. And while focusing on your strengths has been found to have all sorts of benefits, could ignoring your weaknesses come at a cost? 

For decades researchers have been advocating that people’s greatest areas of growth at work lie in developing their strengths. And as a growing body of evidence has found that using your strengths can help you to improve your creativity, productivity and resilience at work, strength-focused coaching has become increasingly popular.

But could focusing on your strengths be damaging to your career? 
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Andrea Ross's curator insight, November 11, 8:45 PM

This is an interesting article, there is definitely a trend towards more strength based coaching in the corporate world currently.  I personally prefer the Hogan Assessments when coaching executives. The HPI assessment tool that focuses on the "Bright Side of Personality" measures qualities that describe how individuals relate to others when they are at their best, the HDS "Dark Side of Personality measures qualities that emerge in times of increased strain and can disrupt relationships, damage reputations and de-rail peoples' chance of success. Using both tools throughout a coaching process is a good way of seeing both the Bright and Dark side of a person. What do all my fellow executive coaches prefer to use and why?  

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Transformation starts with agile leadership | McKinsey

Transformation starts with agile leadership | McKinsey | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
To build and lead an agile organization, it’s crucial that senior leaders develop new mind-sets and capabilities to transform themselves, their teams, and the organization.

For many organizations, surviving and thriving in today’s environment depends on making a fundamental transformation to become more agile. Those making the transition successfully are achieving substantive performance and health improvements: enhanced growth, profitability, customer satisfaction, and employee engagement.
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Managing business growth strategies | McKinsey

Managing business growth strategies | McKinsey | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
To boost organic growth, most companies need a diverse set of initiatives—and how you sequence them matters.

Innovation and growth are often lumped together as management concepts, for good reason: it’s self-evident that innovation drives growth, and conspicuous fast growers often benefit from high-profile innovations. Our research, however, suggests growth-minded companies stand to benefit by disaggregating the two concepts. There are, in fact, multiple paths to growth, and the most common growth characteristics among above-average growers often aren’t related to innovation. Significant as well, companies aspiring to the highest levels of growth need to sequence their initiatives carefully. Put differently: you probably can’t do everything at once.
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4 trends for CIO leadership in 2019: Gartner Symposium takeaways | The Enterprisers Project

4 trends for CIO leadership in 2019: Gartner Symposium takeaways | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The Gartner Symposium/ITxpo is a must-attend event for IT executives. It’s where Gartner reveals its annual list of top trends that CIOs and IT leaders must pay attention to next year. The list for 2019 has already generated a lot of interest, and Gartner’s predictions will continue to be discussed and debated in the months ahead.

But if you were paying attention to Twitter, these predictions weren’t the only topics generating buzz at the event. Here are some of the best quotes, slides, and insights from the Symposium we think IT leaders should see as they begin thinking through their strategies for the new year.
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10 Ways to Make Your Meetings Meaningful

10 Ways to Make Your Meetings Meaningful | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Meetings are the Rodney Dangerfield of the business world, and that lack of respect has legitimate justification. We’ve all attended (and if we’re honest, orchestrated) meetings that lacked focus, devolved into a forum for one or two people’s input, and concluded with no real resolution or action plans for each attendee. The good news is there are steps we can take to transform meetings into a means to generate ideas, provide direction, and foster a sense of community. Read on to learn how to make the most of each meeting you are a part of.
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Career Challenge: Build Stronger Relationships In 15 Days

Career Challenge: Build Stronger Relationships In 15 Days | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Clichés often have some basis in truth, and the old adage “it’s all about who you know” is no exception. At a time when 85% of all jobs are filled through connections and employees with friends at work are more likely to be engaged in their careers, strong professional relationships are key in getting your foot in the door and a leg up the ladder. But since the unwritten rules of networking seem to change faster than you can refresh your LinkedIn profile, it can be puzzling to figure out how best to proceed.

Whether you’re a recent college graduate with just a handful of off-campus contacts to your name or a seasoned professional looking to elevate your decades-old relationships, we want to help you strengthen the quality of your network. So we’re launching “Career Challenge: Build Stronger Relationships In 15 Days.”
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Here's How Highly Effective People Eliminate Drama

Here's How Highly Effective People Eliminate Drama | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Changing this one common habit can mean the difference between good results and trouble
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What Is Strategy?

What Is Strategy? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Today’s dynamic markets and technologies have called into question the sustainability of competitive advantage. Under pressure to improve productivity, quality, and speed, managers have embraced tools such as TQM, benchmarking, and re-engineering. Dramatic operational improvements have resulted, but rarely have these gains translated into sustainable profitability. And gradually, the tools have taken the place of strategy. In his five-part article, Michael Porter explores how that shift has led to the rise of mutually destructive competitive battles that damage the profitability of many companies. As managers push to improve on all fronts, they move further away from viable competitive positions. Porter argues that operational effectiveness, although necessary to superior performance, is not sufficient, because its techniques are easy to imitate. In contrast, the essence of strategy is choosing a unique and valuable position rooted in systems of activities that are much more difficult to match. Porter thus traces the economic basis of competitive advantage down to the level of the specific activities a company performs. Using cases such as Ikea and Vanguard, he shows how making trade-offs among activities is critical to the sustainability of a strategy. Whereas managers often focus on individual components of success such as core competencies or critical resources, Porter shows how managing fit across all of a company’s activities enhances both competitive advantage and sustainability. While stressing the role of leadership in making and enforcing clear strategic choices, Porter also offers advice on how companies can reconnect with strategies that have become blurred over time.
Steve Krogull's insight:

1996 HBR classic

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How Temperament and Gender Bias Marginalize Introverted Women

How Temperament and Gender Bias Marginalize Introverted Women | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Gender and temperament equality at the top benefits everyone: such diversity is proven to enhance creativity and boost productivity. Without gender- and temperament-inclusive cultures, organizations suffer from innovation deficits. A recent HBR study found that a 30-percent increase in the female share of corporate leadership is associated with a 15-percent increase in profitability, and a National Bureau of Economic Research study discovered that introverted CEOs run companies with 2 percent higher returns on assets. Without drawing on the strengths of a diverse workforce, we severely limit our chances of being led by the most qualified individuals who can build teams to create sustainable change. Susan Cain, author of bestseller Quiet and co-founder of Quiet Revolution, noted: “The bias against introversion leads to a colossal waste of talent, energy, and happiness.”
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One word that will make change easier for you

One word that will make change easier for you | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Now I have to work with people I don’t trust.” This was the statement of an audience member at a speech I was giving last week. We were talking about a major organizational change and he was sharing his experience of the new structure. It was immediately obvious that how he was thinking about the change was increasing his resistance to it.

“Have to” versus “Choose to”
The expression, “I have to” is exceedingly common in our vocabulary. “I have to work with sales on this project,” “I have to fill in my paperwork,” “I have to go along with my boss.” This one phrase says so much about how you’re viewing organizational change. As soon as you frame it as “I have to,” you tell yourself that you have no control; you emphasize your powerlessness. You put yourself in the camp that says the change is being done to you. And that’s when you start to resist it.
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Disruption Through Distraction

Disruption Through Distraction | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Tara Bradford had everything going for her business, and the majority of her clients came directly from the video marketing she had been doing for a year. Suddenly, she decided to stop doing the videos. She was bored. And instead of finding ways to change her videos, and exploring other options in addition to the successful video activity, she. Just. Stopped.

This is just one example we spoke about in terms of the choices we’ve made out of boredom and being too comfortable, that ended up taking us in completely different directions - and not always in a good way.

Some of us just don’t recognize when we’re bored early enough to change direction with intention, rather than as impulse. Eventually, though, with enough self-reflection, we can start to see the symptoms before they become overwhelming. That’s the first step. The next step must be to consider our own roles in the scenario. And then? We must make the decision to take small steps toward digging us out of the situation, rather than rushing off into something we’re not really sure will take us where we want to go. Tara’s brilliant strategy was to put herself into situations that a) made her uncomfortable, and b) had her interacting with people and industries she would never have otherwise experienced.
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Change Models and Frameworks

Change Models and Frameworks | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I’ve been thinking about the utility of certain change models, and why even when you use them, change is still really hard to do! Some-where in my brain I recalled an academic paper from a while ago. It struck me it explained the conundrum well. Let me run it by you.

Karl Weick was the academic who wrote the piece. Weick’s was one of my absolute favourites to study. He’s an organisational theorist who writes on sense-making (among other things). He is super storyteller – and his academic writing is incredibly easy to read. If you get the chance check out his paper The Collapse of Sensemaking in Organizations: The Mann Gulch Disaster , in Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 38. At the risk of sounding very nerdy 14 years later when I catch up with friends from uni days we still discuss the concepts at dinners and BBQs. Yep, OK. A bit too nerdy?

Anyhoo, the article I am thinking of tells of the trade-off in writing good theory. (“Conclusion: Theory Construction as Disciplined Reflexivity: Tradeoffs in the 90s” in The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 24, No. 4 , Oct., 1999, pp. 797-806). In it Weick argues there is a trade-off in theory development of three attributes: generalizability, accuracy and simplicity. He suggests you can only ever get two of the three.
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Matson CIO: The most painful, gut-wrenching part of leading transformation | The Enterprisers Project

Matson CIO: The most painful, gut-wrenching part of leading transformation | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I’m an optimist, and, among the CIO community, I’m in very good company.  In fact, leading a transformation is itself an act of optimism and a leap of faith, driven by a deep desire to make a meaningful difference and an unwavering belief in the strategic vision being undertaken. Core to that optimism is the belief that most of the people in your organization who’ve been so dedicated and loyal can make the transformation along with you. However, the stark reality is that the skills required to transform are dramatically different than those required to operate. CIOs who fail to recognize the organizational disruption caused by transformation early on will quickly learn some painful lessons. I had to fight and overcome my optimistic nature in making the tough organizational decisions required for ultimate success.

Early on, I had hoped and estimated that over 60 percent of our staff could navigate our multi-year technology transformation over a five-year period. Given the length of our transformation and how quickly IT roles and technologies evolve, five years seemed to be a good benchmark. So that became my goal – execute our strategy and bring along the majority of our organization.  Well, that didn’t happen.  Through a combination of straightforward and gut-wrenching decisions, there was disruption and turnover in all nearly all areas.  Within four years, less than 40 percent of the original IT organization remained.  
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3 classic management lessons that have stood the test of time

3 classic management lessons that have stood the test of time | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Often, articles that draw advice from psychology for people in business focus on exciting new findings. That makes sense. A new finding may make you think differently about the way you work. A danger in focusing on new research is that subsequent studies may demonstrate that the initial reports do not hold up to further scrutiny.


The field of social psychology has a long history, and much of the seminal work in the field has lasting implications. In the 1950s and early ’60s, much of social psychology grappled with questions inspired by real-world events like the Holocaust.

A half-century later, these findings have lessons to teach today’s leaders. Here are a few examples.
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Digital strategy: The four fights companies need to win | McKinsey

Digital strategy: The four fights companies need to win | McKinsey | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Yesterday’s tentative approaches won’t deliver; you need absolute clarity about digital’s demands, galvanized leadership, unparalleled agility, and the resolve to bet boldly.

If there’s one thing a digital strategy can’t be, it’s incremental. The mismatch between most incumbents’ business models and digital futures is too great—and the environment is changing too quickly—for anything but bold, inventive strategic plans to work.

Unfortunately, most strategic-planning exercises do generate incrementalism. We know this from experience and from McKinsey research: on average, resources don’t move between business units in large organizations. A recent book by our colleagues, Strategy Beyond the Hockey Stick, seeks to explain what causes this inertia (strategy’s social side, rooted in individual interests, group dynamics, and cognitive biases) and to suggest a way out (understanding the real odds of strategy and overhauling your planning processes to deliver the big moves that can overcome those long odds).

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Business Analysis Still Has a Place in Scrum

Business Analysis Still Has a Place in Scrum | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I recently kept getting asked the same question while at a conference for business analysts and project managers in the Boston area. The question went something like this: “I’m a business analyst and my company is moving to agile and scrum, do I still have a job?”

My quick response was there is always room for business analysis in agile and scrum. However, your title might be different, and your responsibilities might change. You might even have opportunities to do other things, if you’re interested and have the skills to do them.

The role of business analysis definitely exists and is needed no matter what framework, method or process you are using. It is often thought that in scrum, the business analysis function is the sole responsibility of the product owner, but that isn’t generally true.
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How to Build a Learn-it-All Organization in a Know-it-All World

How to Build a Learn-it-All Organization in a Know-it-All World | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Relationships are pissing contests in know-it-all organizations.

It’s a losing proposition to work for know-it-alls. YOU’RE never good enough. THEY’RE always right.

People don’t listen, learn, and improve in know-it-all organizations. They’re too busy proving they’re right.

People don’t respect learners in know-it-all organizations because everyone already knows.

The future belongs to learn-it-alls. There is no hope for a know-it-all.
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How to Build An Ecosystem of Innovation

How to Build An Ecosystem of Innovation | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
On this episode of IT Visionaries, Ian sits down with Paul Chapman, the Chief Information Officer at Box. Paul shares with us on how to build an ecosystem of innovation, the future of work and how to become a better CIO.
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Seven Ways To Boost Your Emotional Intelligence So You Can Develop Deeper Relationships

Seven Ways To Boost Your Emotional Intelligence So You Can Develop Deeper Relationships | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In 1990, professors Peter Salovey and John Mayer published their work on emotional intelligence. The concept was then made popular by Daniel Goleman whose book, Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ became a bestseller in 1996.

Since then, emotional intelligence has become a hot topic in leadership groups, corporate trainings and human resources workshops—and with good reason. There is a lot of evidence that shows emotional intelligence can have a major impact on work performance. Employees with high emotional intelligence perform better, enjoy better relationships, experience better psychological well-being and are more likely to be physically healthy.
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