IT and Leadership
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4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization

4 Steps to Improving IT Value Realization | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Improving IT value realization is clearly top of mind for many executives these days. Sadly, IT value realization is more of a focus among CEO's and CFO's tha
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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What My 13-Year Old Taught Me About Being Trustworthy | Thrive Global

What My 13-Year Old Taught Me About Being Trustworthy | Thrive Global | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Lessons in leadership trustworthiness. Gain insight into the impact of being trustworthy.
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WorkdayVoice: Workday Joins Sovrin Foundation, a Blockchain Standards Organization

WorkdayVoice: Workday Joins Sovrin Foundation, a Blockchain Standards Organization | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Organizations often sort employees into categories such as A, B, and C players. They also identify “high potentials," referred to as “hi-po’s," for investment in leadership effectiveness coaching and development programs.

Does your organization have a “hi-po” program? Have you been identified for development? If yes, good for you! I have ideas on how to maximize the benefit of any leadership development and coaching program your company may provide.

However, in this post, I want to focus on strategies for developing leadership skills for those who may not have an opportunity for a formal program, either because there isn't a budget for one or because they have been passed over for one reason or another.
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The Hidden Powers Of Effective Mentoring

The Hidden Powers Of Effective Mentoring | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Over the years, I have had the privilege of being an advisor, coach, and mentor to some of the most talented individuals. Through my extensive global diversity and business acumen, I have discovered the real power of successful mentoring comes from creating a deep connection and trust with my mentees.

Despite a very hectic travel schedule due to my international consulting and coaching practice, I find meaning in giving back in a tangible way. For this reason, I have accepted opportunities to mentor a number of people, handpicked for their drive toward professional development. I simply could not say no to individuals hungry to grow their skills and develop talent in specific areas of their lives.
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The Four Team Toxins

The Four Team Toxins | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The chances are that at some point in your professional life you will have experienced the dynamics of being both a leader and a team player. Each of us is both an accomplished individual and a part of complex systems such as our families, communities, and the organisation we work for. Navigating the complex web of relationship dynamics that exist within teams and organisations can be like walking through a minefield and is often a challenge for even the most experienced leaders and managers.

These systems are like spider webs, touch one strand and the whole structure feels the effects. This can be unsettling for even the most experienced leaders and managers. We do great work with one individual or team member only to find it has an unintended impact on another team member, or another team/department with the organisation. Reducing negative interactions within teams and organisations can have a powerful impact and help to strengthen this complex web and improve working relationships between departments, teams and team members.

The Four Team Toxins
John Gottman PhD is an internationally renowned relationship expert and best-selling author. In his research (see references), he has identified certain kinds of negativity that are so lethal to relationships he refers to them as the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. They are equally relevant to professional relationships. When we work with organisations and teams we refer to them as the Four Team Toxins.
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Are You Working Too Hard On Yourself?

Are You Working Too Hard On Yourself? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Go Easy

I’ve recently noticed that hardly a day goes by when I’m not thinking about or doing something to improve my life. It can be anything from researching new kitty litter to building a B&B in Hawaii just so I can have fresh papaya every day. It hardly ever stops—unless I’m dealing with the problem du jour—and I’ve decided it’s time to take a break from pushing myself. Makes me wonder if trying to do all this growth work hasn’t made me shrink in other ways. 

I only bring this up because, back in the day, we used to call people who went to every workshop around “self-development junkies.” I don’t need a workshop, because my own head takes me there—the funny part is I used to lead those workshops, and I was so into it. Now it’s a much different story. My goals have changed, and a peaceful life is more attractive than ever. One does not always have to be growing to be green and fruitful.
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What Is an Obliger?

We’ve long been intrigued by the work of personal well-being expert Gretchen Rubin, author of blockbuster best-seller The Happiness Project. But it wasn’t until we stumbled upon her book The Four Tendencies that we gained essential insight into our entire way of being, you guys. 

In her book, Rubin breaks down humankind into four distinct categories, determined by how we answer the question, “How do I respond to expectations?” And there are two types of expectations, she clarifies: External (work deadlines, Tax Day) and Internal (New Year’s resolutions, self-care, etc.). The respondent categories are Upholders, Questioners, Obligers and Rebels. There’s even a handy quiz to determine which one you are. But if you’re anything like us, you’ll know instantly if you’re an Obliger. No quiz necessary. 

It also probably won’t surprise you to learn that out of all four categories, Obligers are likeliest to feel overwhelmed and dissatisfied. Explains Jennifer Liu of LearnVest: “Obligers are most likely to put others’ needs ahead of their own, which can make them feel unfulfilled in their work—a leading cause of burnout.” The good news—sort of? “Obligers excel at meeting external demands and deadlines, and go to great lengths to meet their responsibilities, so they make terrific colleagues, family members, and friends,” writes Rubin. “Others rely on them tremendously.” Just don’t count on them to treat themselves with the same respect. “Obligers take their commitments to other people seriously, but generally let themselves down,” writes Rubin. “Obligers meet outer expectations, but struggle to meet inner expectations. They’re motivated by external accountability; they wake up and think, What must I do today?”
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Adapting to Change Can Be HARD | Thrive Global

Adapting to Change Can Be HARD | Thrive Global | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
An ancient philosopher once said, “change is the only constant.” Whether it’s moving to a new city, starting a new relationship, changing jobs, or even getting a new pet, change is an inevitable part of life! But despite its inevitability, change is something that can cause us stress, even when those changes are positive.

If change happens so frequently, why is it so difficult? For one thing, humans are creatures of habit. Much of what we do daily–from putting on our clothes to driving a car–happens without us even thinking about it. Our brains don’t need to do a lot of work to carry out repetitive behaviors that have formed into habits–our unconscious brain takes over. But changing those routines is a different story. It requires focus and attention, and it makes our brain work overtime to adapt; we have to be intentional and make conscious choices. This explains why it’s so hard to stick to a New Year’s resolution or why your grandma won’t use the new iPhone you bought her–these changes demand new behaviors, and that’s a heavy lift for the brain.

And then there is the uncertainty that often accompanies change. Humans have never been big fans of uncertainty, and for good reason. Knowing what’s hiding in that rustling bush (a friendly bunny or a venomous snake) was important to our ancestors for survival. Having reliable information to help us predict what will happen next makes us feel safe. Even changes that can lead to new possibilities and opportunities, like graduating from college, may still cause anxiety. The chance to start your career is exciting, but at the same time the uncertainty of what that career will look like and where it will lead, can be scary.
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If Your Data Is Bad, Your Machine Learning Tools Are Useless

If Your Data Is Bad, Your Machine Learning Tools Are Useless | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Poor data quality is enemy number one to the widespread, profitable use of machine learning. While the caustic observation, “garbage-in, garbage-out” has plagued analytics and decision-making for generations, it carries a special warning for machine learning. The quality demands of machine learning are steep, and bad data can rear its ugly head twice — first in the historical data used to train the predictive model and second in the new data used by that model to make future decisions.

To properly train a predictive model, historical data must meet exceptionally broad and high quality standards. First, the data must be right: It must be correct, properly labeled, de-deduped, and so forth. But you must also have the right data — lots of unbiased data, over the entire range of inputs for which one aims to develop the predictive model. Most data quality work focuses on one criterion or the other, but for machine learning, you must work on both simultaneously.

Yet today, most data fails to meet basic “data are right” standards. Reasons range from data creators not understanding what is expected, to poorly calibrated measurement gear, to overly complex processes, to human error. To compensate, data scientists cleanse the data before training the predictive model. It is time-consuming, tedious work (taking up to 80% of data scientists’ time), and it’s the problem data scientists complain about most. Even with such efforts, cleaning neither detects nor corrects all the errors, and as yet, there is no way to understand the impact on the predictive model. What’s more, data does not always meets “the right data” standards, as reports of bias in facial recognition and criminal justice attest.
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Great Leadership: Beyond Self Awareness: Leadership’s Next Frontier

Great Leadership: Beyond Self Awareness: Leadership’s Next Frontier | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Many of us feel like we’re going into battle each day. As leaders, we’re often simply trying to survive and make it to the next round of the fight.

No wonder we lose sight of our ‘why’. Work is exhausting. We’ve sped up technology and innovation but remain trapped in models, processes and working norms that were built in the early twentieth century. We are in the Age of Collaboration and yet bound by the Age of Industrialization.


We focus on the acquisition of knowledge and yet ignore how to increase our mind’s capacity to handle all this bombardment of data.

Where we used to think of self-insight and self-awareness as the ‘holy grail’ in leadership development, it is time to move beyond simply ‘knowing’ who we are as leaders to ‘reshaping’ who we are as leaders.


Here are three ways we can expand our individual and collective capacity in order to engage fully in this accelerated world of work.

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What do high performing leadership teams look like?

What do high performing leadership teams look like? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
How do you know what an effective leadership team looks like? Although we’ve come a long way in identifying what makes organisations successful, many companies still struggle with the make-up of their leadership teams.

Winsborough’s “The effectiveness of senior teams” research revealed five factors effective leadership teams have in common. “We compard the data of the executives who rated their teams positively with those who rated them poorly and identified key factors where the gap in performance was widest between these two groups,” says Gus McIntosh, Winsborough CEO.

“Overall we saw that better teams are clear about goals, standards and approach. These teams have members who help each other for the overall good and critically reflect on their combined performance. Decision making is clear, and all agendas and concerns are on the table. Decisions are taken clearly and executed. We see that the whole team contributes well and no-one ‘withholds their effort’ while the overall environment is one of openness, support and trust,” he says.
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Try these two smart techniques to help you master your emotions |

Try these two smart techniques to help you master your emotions | | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
By more clearly identifying our feelings or by recategorizing them, we can reduce suffering (yes!) and increase well-being, says neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett.
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The Five Stages of Purposeful Engagement by Jennifer Dulski - 166.03.Purposeful - ChangeThis

The Five Stages of Purposeful Engagement by Jennifer Dulski - 166.03.Purposeful - ChangeThis | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“While at Change.org, I got a unique perspective into the world of decision-makers because of the more than one thousand campaigns started every day on the site asking people and institutions for change. From the data, I’ve seen that there are a series of predictable stages decision-makers tend to go through as they react to campaigns that are directed at them. I call them the Five Stages of Engagement: denial, listening, acceptance, embracing, and empowering. Not all decision-makers go through each of the five stages, but we do see each of these stages play out on a regular basis.


Understanding the stages can help you be more effective in persuading decision-makers that you are working to influence. In particular, helping decision-makers see the risks that come from denial and the benefits that come from listening and then acting can help you make your own case more persuasive. For the purposes of describing each stage briefly below, I’ve referenced petitions to corporate decision-makers, since they take place in a shorter time frame and clearly demonstrate each stage. Nevertheless, these stories illustrate the way decision-makers of all types react to appeals for change.”

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Great Leaders Are Confident, Connected, Committed, and Courageous

Great Leaders Are Confident, Connected, Committed, and Courageous | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

No matter your age, your role, your position, your title, your profession, or your status, to get your most important work done, you have to have hard conversations, create accountability, and inspire action.

In order to do that, you need to show up powerfully and magnetically in a way that attracts people to trust you, follow you, and commit to putting 100% of their effort into a larger purpose, something bigger than all of you. You need to care about others and connect with them in such a way that they feel your care. You need to speak persuasively — in a way that’s clear, direct, and honest and that reflects your care — while listening with openness, compassion, and love. Even when being challenged.
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Beyond Budgeting - The Adaptive And Agile Management Model

Beyond Budgeting - The Adaptive And Agile Management Model | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Beyond Budgeting has now been around for twenty years. More and more companies across the world are embarking on a Beyond Budgeting journey, from global giants to smaller ones not yet strangled by corporate controls and bureaucracy, eager to protect their start-up agility as they grow.

The financial crisis ten years ago was a stark reminder for many that businesses need something more agile and responsive than what traditional management can offer, including budgeting – a management technology invented a hundred years ago under very different circumstances.

Lately, after years of trying to scale Agile, “Business Agility“ has (finally) become a hot topic. Beyond Budgeting has been on this end of agility all the way back when Agile was only a software development thing.
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If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It?

If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Almost every leader wants to make more time for strategic thinking. In one survey of 10,000 senior leaders, 97% of them said that being strategic was the leadership behavior most important to their organization’s success.

And yet in another study, a full 96% of the leaders surveyed said they lacked the time for strategic thinking. Of course, we’re all oppressed with meetings and overwhelmed with emails (an average of 126 per day, according to a Radicati Group analysis).

But leaders presumably could take at least some steps to prioritize what they claim to be an imperative. What could account for such a massive misalignment between their stated goals and their actions?
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Why Do We Undervalue Competent Management?

Why Do We Undervalue Competent Management? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

In MBA programs, students are taught that companies can’t expect to compete on the basis of internal managerial competencies because they’re just too easy to copy. Operational effectiveness—doing the same thing as other companies but doing it exceptionally well—is not a path to sustainable advantage in the competitive universe. To stay ahead, the thinking goes, a company must stake out a distinctive strategic position—doing something different than its rivals. This is what the C-suite should focus on, leaving middle and lower-level managers to handle the nuts and bolts of managing the organization and executing plans.

Michael Porter articulated the difference between strategy and operational effectiveness in his seminal 1996 HBR article, “What Is Strategy?” The article’s analysis of strategy and the strategist’s role is rightly influential, but our research shows that simple managerial competence is more important—and less imitable—than Porter argued.

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A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings

A CEO Manifesto for Better Meetings | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Meetings. We may not like them but they are an indispensable part of modern work life and they’re essential to getting things done. To transform meetings from a slog into a structured opportunity to move things forward, you simply have to have a clear process for managing them properly.  Because meetings are a significant part of a CEO’s life, I’ve developed very clear rules and guidelines for meetings over the course of my over 40-year leadership journey. I’ve crafted these into a manifesto that adds discipline to ensure each meeting is as productive as possible.  Importantly, I tell my direct reports these expectations for meetings the very first hour of the first day we work together, when I “Declare Myself” – a practice I’ve developed to take the mystery out of working relationships and hit the ground running (you can learn more about the “Declaring Yourself” practice here).

To be clear, you don’t have to use these exact rules. But they’re offered as an example that can help you craft your own clear and organized approach to meetings.

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Introvert or Extrovert? Here's How to Boost Your Productivity

Why our personality types affect the way we work
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How Objectifying People Makes Your World Smaller

How Objectifying People Makes Your World Smaller | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s said that one thing that makes humans unique is our ability to make tools. While some other primates can also make rudimentary tools, we excel at it.

Our toolmaking ability has allowed us to build some pretty incredible things – skyscrapers, skateparks, ice cream makers, smartphones. Unfortunately, that same toolmaking ability has allowed us to make tools out of people – and consequently, out of ourselves (heh).
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How I Improved My Communication Skills By Following One Simple Rule

How I Improved My Communication Skills By Following One Simple Rule | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
All entrepreneurs are professional communicators. It’s how we spend almost all of our time.

According to a recent study, CEOs spend 61 percent of their time in face-to-face meetings, and 24 percent on electronic communications. The remaining 15 percent is spent reading or responding to written correspondence. Yes, that’s right: When you’re not reading, you’re communicating, either verbally or in writing.
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A Harvard Study Reveals 1 Change That Will Make Any CEO More Effective

A Harvard Study Reveals 1 Change That Will Make Any CEO More Effective | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
At Motto, I consult with a lot of leaders, but whether their companies have 1,000 employees or 10, they all feel like there aren't enough hours in the day to run the show the way they'd like. According to a brand-new Harvard study, they're right.

The study, called "The Leader's Calendar," invested 12 years of exhaustive fact finding to confirm what most of us already knew: CEOs have lots of resources but not enough time. If you run an organization, you get that. You're working nights and weekends and giving up any shot at a social life, but it always feels like there's more to do, right? Well, thanks to the good people at Harvard, we know what to blame.

Meetings. Buried in the data is the bombshell that the average CEO in the study spent 72 percent of his or her time in meetings. Seriously? Even Harvard doesn't believe that more meetings equals better business.
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7 warning signs that your career is stalling

7 warning signs that your career is stalling | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s not unusual to see a leader turn a company around and bring it to success, only to fail at the next challenge. Some call it the sophomore slump, but it’s really a case of, “What got you here won’t get you there,” says John Hillen, coauthor of What Happens Now? Reinvent Yourself as a Leader Before Your Business Outruns You.


“Leaders are often victims of their own success,” says Hillen. “They wanted the change; they put the business plan in place. Then they themselves don’t make parallel plans to change with the organization. That’s why leaders often stall on the other side.”

What it takes to become a successful leader is not what you need to remain a leader. Playing at the higher level requires different skills, capabilities, mind-sets, behaviors, and attitudes. “Most leaders get it intellectually,” says Hillen, executive in residence and professor of practice in the School of Business at George Mason University. “Unfortunately, what they often do is focus energy on tinkering with the organization instead of reinventing themselves.”
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7 Life Truths I Wish I Knew Sooner

7 Life Truths I Wish I Knew Sooner | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
We often talk about stepping into our true power, about building our confidence muscle and boosting our self-esteem. But although self-confidence and self-esteem seem similar—referring to how we feel about ourselves—they are two very different concepts.

Self-esteem refers to how we generally feel about ourselves: how much we like or love ourselves, and the overall image we have about who we are—positive or negative. It is shaped by our experiences and the environments we grow up in, by our family members, our school and our community. Self-confidence relates to how we feel about our abilities and how capable we see ourselves of doing certain things or handling different situations.
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Are You Taking Things Too Personally? Stop Internalizing and Start Leading With These 3 Strategies

Are You Taking Things Too Personally? Stop Internalizing and Start Leading With These 3 Strategies | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Culture has become the official buzz word in the business world. A strong culture is where talent flocks, employees stay, and innovation excels. And while there's no magic formula or quick way to do it, we do know that it starts and ends with great leadership. 

Leadership is all about making things personal. But there's a big difference between making things personal and taking things personally. In fact, the latter can become a leader's downfall. Internalizing every criticism, setback, and situation that doesn't work in your favor will lead to a skewed perspective, inhibiting your ability to lead effectively. 

However, we all know that separating your feelings is incredibly difficult, if not impossible. We're not made of stone. We're also not robots. How are you supposed to be lead a company with a human-centric approach, yet let things roll off your shoulder? It can all be very confusing.
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The 4 S’s of Meaningful Work

The 4 S’s of Meaningful Work | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Never retire.

There’s a big reason the healthiest societies in the world have no word for retirement. I believe retirement is a false concept based on assumptions no longer true. Age 65 retirement was invented when average lifespan was 70.

What’s the solution?

Keep working.  

And make sure whatever you’re doing includes the 4 S’s of meaningful wor
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