IT and Leadership
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15 Big Differences Between Acting Like a Boss and BEING a Leader | TerryStarbucker.com

15 Big Differences Between Acting Like a Boss and BEING a Leader | TerryStarbucker.com | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In fast paced, high stress business environments it can be all too easy sometimes for leaders to slip into what I call “Boss Man” mode. What I mean by that is that they stop being a leader, and start acting like a boss.
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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Piet Niederhausen: Building muscles for change: Complexity and collaboration

Suppose you are a person of average health. You try to take the stairs; you're a little out of breath when you get to the top. You go to the gym for a while; the results are discouraging compared to the effort. The muscles in your body are optimized for your current lifestyle, which doesn't require a lot of physical activity.

Now suppose you decide to run the Boston Marathon. Do you have the potential to do it? Almost certainly -- but you know it'll take lots of training. You'll need to build the discipline, the muscles, the stamina, the techniques. And then you can do it.

Like our human bodies, our organizations have the potential to escape sabre-toothed tigers with split-second reflexes, or to bring down a woolly mammoth to feed the tribe. But do we have the current ability? Identifying the boundaries of an organization's current abilities and proposing a path for increased organizational capacity are core activities for business architecture.
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The meetings a CIO can't skip: Listening to customers | The Enterprisers Project

The meetings a CIO can't skip: Listening to customers | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When was the last time you embedded yourself with your customers? If you took a moment to find your answer, it’s probably been too long.

Given how quickly technology changes, checking in with customers sooner rather than later is important. I’ve spent some time in the field over the past six months and was instantly reminded how inspiring, invigorating, and necessary it is to connect with the people you serve. It’s easy to lose sight of why you do what you do when you’re confined to the same four walls of your office.

I attended regional meetings and met with branch managers to discuss the challenges they’re facing and how the mortgage marketplace is changing. Because they’re the ones fighting every day to bring revenue into the company, their focus and priorities should be our focus and priorities, too.
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Creating a More Collaborative Higher Education Ecosystem | Higher Ed Gamma

Creating a More Collaborative Higher Education Ecosystem | Higher Ed Gamma | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Most sectors of the U.S. economy are highly concentrated with one notable exception: Higher education. 

It is ironic that the academy is perhaps the most striking example in American society of the competitive marketplace in action. Colleges and universities engage in a constant struggle for resources, faculty, students, and reputation.

A marketplace mentality prevails, with institutions out for themselves and the devil take the hindmost. 

Institutional competition is a source of American higher education’s greatest strengths, but also for many of its weaknesses. No institution, no matter how prestigious, can afford to wrest on its laurels. All feel intense pressure to keep up with pace-setter institutions, whether this involves facilities, amenities, academic programs, or student services.

The drive to improve an institution’s ranking can be a force for good: promoting improvements in student-faculty ratios, reductions in class size, and expenditures on instruction and services. But the competitive marketplace also discourages institutions from deviating very far from established norms. Harvard envy and flagship envy are a genuine reality.

One consequences of market competition is that higher education is among this society’s most stratified sectors. Institutions vary widely across every fault line: endowment size, instructional and financial aid expenditures, and students’ college preparedness, among others.
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An IT leader's eternal top goal: Strong partnerships | The Enterprisers Project

An IT leader's eternal top goal: Strong partnerships | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The best leadership advice I ever received was, "The most critical skill required to succeed is a willingness to partner."

I was given this bit of advice from a peer, Jennifer Leggio, when we were thrust into leadership roles when our company at the time, Sourcefire, was acquired by Cisco – which had an employee and contractor ecosystem of hundreds of thousands. We were discussing the new challenges that come with a much larger company, like Cisco, when Jennifer shared this thought with me, "The most critical skill required to succeed is a willingness to partner." Immediately, the light bulb went off in my head, and it's been an integral part of my organizational philosophy ever since.

It resonated with me for one simple reason: Every business unit in a modern company depends on IT resources.  And every IT implementation depends on active participation from the requesting business unit.

Without each group fully engaged, trusting one another and sharing accountability, wins and losses, these shared projects, programs, and strategic initiatives have little chance of success.  
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The 6 Fundamental Skills Every Leader Should Practice

The 6 Fundamental Skills Every Leader Should Practice | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Our research and experience have shown us that the best way to develop proficiency in leadership is not just through reading books and going to training courses, but even more through real experience and continual practice.
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Leading With Ethics

Leading With Ethics | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In today’s high-visibility world with the constant social media avalanche, it’s more important than ever to ensure that, as a leader, your ethical message is consistent. Anyone out there can talk the talk, but if you don’t truly believe in the importance of ethical behavior in your business career, it will become apparent to your employees, your peers and to the people occupying the C-suite.
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Leadership Development is All About Layering –

Leadership Development is All About Layering – | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The challenge of developing leaders can loom as a daunting prospect.

Contributors aren’t prepared to lead others when the opportunity arises, and the cascading effects quickly compound. One reason that might explain the predicament, is an underlying belief that early career experiences and leadership roles are completely distinct entities. In reality, many of the skills required for success at various career levels, overlap and remain critical over time. If we could approach development as a “layered” phenomenon — building core strengths over a longer period of time — we could take a fresh approach to development.

Leadership readiness doesn’t materialize as the result of completing an inflexible, structured development program. Becoming a capable leader is an evolution — a co-mingling of training, coaching, and exposure to the types of challenge that offer the opportunity for both insight and growth.
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12 Habits That Will Transform the Way You Lead

12 Habits That Will Transform the Way You Lead | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon’s history begins with Dilbert’s boss relaying senior leadership’s explanation for the company’s low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, “So they’re saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?” To which Dilbert’s boss replies, “These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context.”

Great leadership is indeed a difficult thing to pin down and understand. You know a great leader when you’re working for one, but even they can have a hard time explaining the specifics of what they do that makes their leadership so effective.

Great leaders change us for the better. They see more in us than we see in ourselves, and they help us learn to see it too. They dream big and show us all the great things we can accomplish.
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Changing change management | McKinsey

Changing change management | McKinsey | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Research tells us that most change efforts fail. Yet change methodologies are stuck in a predigital era. It’s high time to start catching up.

Change management as it is traditionally applied is outdated. We know, for example, that 70 percent of change programs fail to achieve their goals, largely due to employee resistance and lack of management support. We also know that when people are truly invested in change it is 30 percent more likely to stick. While companies have been obsessing about how to use digital to improve their customer-facing businesses, the application of digital tools to promote and accelerate internal change has received far less scrutiny. However, applying new digital tools can make change more meaningful—and durable—both for the individuals who are experiencing it and for those who are implementing it.
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Why Your Managers Should Be Like Coaches (Not Bosses)

Why Your Managers Should Be Like Coaches (Not Bosses) | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Do you remember your favorite coach from your younger years?

Maybe they shouted loudly from the sidelines for you to stay on your toes, or maybe they quietly reminded you as you stepped off the field. Maybe they were tough on you -- too tough sometimes.

But they did it because they believed in you more than you believed in yourself. Your coach was your biggest fan.

If your coach was a good one, they gave you feedback when you needed it and space when you didn't. They set individualized goals for you to achieve, then supported you with what you needed to reach them.

They spent time with you, they recognized your achievements, however small, and they helped develop you on and off the field. They built a relationship with you that allowed for tough conversations under pressure.
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Leadership Guide for Handling Conflict

Leadership Guide for Handling Conflict | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Conflict happens, whether we want it to or not. Most of us have a strong, visceral reaction to conflict, including (but not limited to) fear, avoidance, excitement and/or dread. However, when you boil it down, conflict is just when one person’s desires are different from the other person. Yet the emotions that conflict evokes can often make situations seem explosive.

Leaders need to manage conflict when it arises. So where do leaders start when they want to understand the conflict styles of themselves and others? My favorite tool for developing this knowledge is the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI).
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CTO Advisor 063: Can enterprise IT adapt? w/Kelsey Hightower —

CTO Advisor 063: Can enterprise IT adapt? w/Kelsey Hightower — | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Google's Kelsey Hightower joins the podcast for a reality check for enterprise IT. Keith and Mark ask the question, "Can enterprises adapt" to the quickly changing technology landscape? Do organizations have the budget and aptitude for navigating the disruption. Kelsey gives a pretty blunt assessment. Kelsey claims debates around issues such as CI/CD are now over. Kelsey shares his vision of the relation containers, the cloud, and business value. 
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7 Easy Ways to Take More Initiative at Work

7 Easy Ways to Take More Initiative at Work | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Let’s face it; nobody wants to be labelled the office ‘eager beaver’. You know, the one who loves to volunteer for coffee runs, that stays an extra hour to polish reports and uses their lunch break to fix the photocopier?

But while it’s easy to poke fun of the eager beaver’s antics and wonder where they get the motivation from, we can actually learn a thing or two from the person who’s willing to go the extra mile for the good of the company.

So, if you’re itching to take initiative at work but don’t want to ruffle any feathers, here are a few quick and easy tips that can get your foot in the door and onto the career ladder.
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Customer Surveys Are No Substitute for Actually Talking to Customers

Customer Surveys Are No Substitute for Actually Talking to Customers | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I’ll never forget the questionnaire handed to me midway through a flight from Los Angeles to Sydney. It was massive. Page after page of detailed tick-the-box or circle-the-response questions – it seemed to me it would take the full 13-hour flight to complete. I started, but it was too much work and I abandoned it halfway through. I thought to myself: does management really believe they get valid and reliable data from these surveys?

For many organizations, surveys like this qualify as “talking to the customer.” They’re ubiquitous – appearing in hotel rooms, after online purchases, and in hospital emergency departments. But do they really qualify as customer consultation? Or are they a symptom of an isolated management just putting on a show of interest? What can be done instead?
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Are Your High Expectations Hurting Your Team?

Are Your High Expectations Hurting Your Team? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
During a recent interview with a member of my client’s executive team, a leader said to me, “Nothing I do is ever good enough for [the CEO]. We’re all starting to ask ourselves why we bother trying.” When I later debriefed the assessment findings with the CEO, she said, “People consistently disappoint me. It’s always been that way. I have high standards. That’s why I get the results that I do.”

When we discussed the unintended consequences of her expectations, it had never occurred to her that she was undermining the very results she sought. Conventional management wisdom suggests that setting a high bar for employees is a good thing. But when employees can never reach that bar, those high standards become weapons, leaving bitterness and unrealized potential in their wake.
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What to Do as Number One, and Number Two: Navigating the Most Important Business Relationship of Your Life

What to Do as Number One, and Number Two: Navigating the Most Important Business Relationship of Your Life | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It is not unusual even in the best of circumstances for a number one and number two to find a yawning gap in their relationship. As time goes on they notice that their views, styles, and ways of working are not always complementary, and that circumstances are making the dynamic of the relationship even more challenging. This is compounded by the fact that they have few people to consult outside of spouses and family members. That’s a lonely situation when the stakes are high.

While circumstances such as these certainly put pressure on business relationships, most issues lie within.  A number one and number two need to begin looking not at the pressures all around them, but at what’s happening between them.  If there are reasons to remain on for a period in their respective roles, or to build for the future, acknowledging what is happening between them is the first step to change. 
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Colleges Are Getting Smarter About Student Evaluations. Here’s How.

Colleges Are Getting Smarter About Student Evaluations. Here’s How. | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Emily Wu and Kenneth Ancell, two students at the University of Oregon, approached their honors research professor, Bill Harbaugh, a few years ago about studying the relationship between student evaluations and grade inflation. Harbaugh, a professor of economics, was enthusiastic. Wu and Ancell dived into the university’s extensive data on evaluation and transcripts, focusing on its two largest schools, journalism and business.

What they found surprised them.

"Having a female instructor is correlated with higher student achievement," Wu said, but female instructors received systematically lower course evaluations. In looking at prerequisite courses, the two researchers found a negative correlation between students’ evaluations and learning. "If you took the prerequisite class from a professor with high student teaching evaluations," Harbaugh said, "you were likely, everything else equal, to do worse in the second class."

The team found numerous studies with similar findings. "It replicates what many, many other people found," said Harbaugh. "But to see it at my own university, I sort of felt like I had to do something about it."
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Harnessing the Transformative Power of Adaptive Learning

Harnessing the Transformative Power of Adaptive Learning | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
If you are in the learning and development space, you’ve probably heard the buzz around the term “adaptive learning”. Perhaps you may have even stumbled across a few adaptive learning use cases and learning management platforms.

Several education tech vendors are doing phenomenal and groundbreaking work in adaptive learning. When the right combination of brain science, learning theory, artificial intelligence, and sound instructional design practices are applied to the mix, it is a formula for success.

However, all that glitters is not gold. While some companies are doing excellent work, others aren’t so awesome—they know how to deliver the sizzle, but the steak is not so tasty. But with a working definition of adaptive learning and its transformational power, you can better judge for yourself.
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Why employers are spending more on learning and development

Why employers are spending more on learning and development | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Too many employers believe they're in a Catch-22 when it comes to upskilling employees. The cost seems prohibitive, but the price paid for untrained workers may be higher. They worry if they invest in training, employees will move on to greener pastures, but worry if they don't train, they will be stuck with unskilled workers.

Walmart can easily absorb learning spend, but the company is known for its cost-consciousness, and L&D is no exception. Ellie Bertani, director of HR strategy and innovation at Walmart, suggested rethinking the cost of learning. 

"I believe business needs to stop looking at employees as a cost center and realize they are an investment. Training them is an investment that will pay dividends in the future," she said. 

The metrics are more than just the training cost per employee; retention, engagement and attracting quality hires are all part of the ROI of training.
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Why the Best Leaders Don’t Always Have a Plan

Why the Best Leaders Don’t Always Have a Plan | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“Leadership isn’t what we think it is, and it never has been.”
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What metrics matter: A guide for open source projects

What metrics matter: A guide for open source projects | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
"Without data, you're just a person with an opinion."

Those are the words of W. Edwards Deming, the champion of statistical process control, who was credited as one of the inspirations for what became known as the Japanese post-war economic miracle of 1950 to 1960. Ironically, Japanese manufacturers like Toyota were far more receptive to Deming’s ideas than General Motors and Ford were.

Community management is certainly an art. It’s about mentoring. It’s about having difficult conversations with people who are hurting the community. It’s about negotiation and compromise. It’s about interacting with other communities. It’s about making connections. In the words of Red Hat’s Diane Mueller, it’s about "nurturing conversations."

However, it’s also about metrics and data.

Some have much in common with software development projects more broadly. Others are more specific to the management of the community itself. I think of deciding what to measure and how as adhering to five principles.
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Study offers data to show MOOCs didn't achieve their goals

Study offers data to show MOOCs didn't achieve their goals | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It has become a platitude by now to say that massive open online courses largely failed to achieve the promise many advocates saw to expand access to high-quality education democratically throughout the world.

But now two researchers have provided the analysis and data to prove it.

In an article in Science entitled "The MOOC Pivot" (subscription required for full article), Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Justin Reich and José A. Ruipérez-Valiente strive to explain why MOOCs largely fell short of their purported mission of transforming education worldwide, leading the top providers of the courses -- including Coursera and edX, which MIT co-founded with Harvard University -- to focus instead on the more traditional role of helping colleges take their academic programs online.
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Hey Leader, One More Time: It’s Not About YOU!

Hey Leader, One More Time: It’s Not About YOU! | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders are constantly told how special and better they are.

Think of the privileges that leaders are afforded. Leaders get bigger office spaces (with more windows), better parking spaces, more agenda airtime, more deference, and fatter salaries.

They also get less flak when they show up late for meetings, interrupt people, or skirt policies or processes that everyone else has to follow. Sometimes it seems as if leaders were meant to levitate above the rest of us mere mortals.

It’s no surprise that some leaders are seduced into thinking they are “better” than everyone else, that they deserve more of the spoils.

Hubris is what you get when a leader is spoiled.
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How to Set Up an AI Center of Excellence

How to Set Up an AI Center of Excellence | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence is one of the most powerful technologies for reshaping business in decades. It has the ability to optimize many processes throughout organizations and is already the engine behind some of the world’s most valuable platform businesses. In our view AI will become a permanent aspect of the business landscape and AI capabilities need to be sustainable over time in order to develop and support potential new business models and capabilities.
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IT manager’s survival guide: 11 ways to thrive in the years ahead

IT manager’s survival guide: 11 ways to thrive in the years ahead | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Technology executives see a range of potential dangers to managers who are out of step with an evolving IT landscape, and some new research suggests IT managers are not quite as layoff-proof as in previous years.
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