Issues in Special Education
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Inclusion Pros and Cons

BY JANNA ABO-GEORGE & TIFFANY RABNER THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY EDUC - 246 SPRING 2010 Inclusion: Support For & Against Click on the “Speaker”...
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This presentation shows both advantages and disadvantages of having an inclusive classroom. There are great advantages from both sides that appear to be true, but how do we actually determine if an inclusive classroom is effective? We must not only believe what the people above us hold redeemable, but we must also research the matter ourselves. Inclusion can be proved effective with some individuals and not others. Depending on the severity of a disability, inclusion may end up hurting the overall well being of a student. Doing appropriate research is vital when determining whether or not inclusion should be part of the school system.

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Concerns About and Arguments Against Inclusion and/or Full Inclusion - Issues ...about Change, Inclusion: The Pros and Cons, Volume 4, Number 3

Concerns About and Arguments Against Inclusion and/or Full Inclusion - Issues ...about Change, Inclusion: The Pros and Cons, Volume 4, Number 3 | Issues in Special Education | Scoop.it
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Those who advocate against inclusion are just as passionate and informed as those who argue for it. When the intellectual ability of students is so far spaced in a classroom, teachers are obligated to direct individual attention based on the level of learning. This decreases the time spent with the rest of the class, thus making it nearly impossible to adequately teach the mandated instruction needed for academic improvement. Special education teachers also have reservations about placing students in inclusive classrooms. There is a concern that when children leave their classrooms, they will lose advocacy and services appropriated to their individual disabilities. In some cases, the educational structure and environment may be completely inappropriate certain students. When spreading special needs students across the school, services become diluted and programming is not as effective. Even though the ideas on which inclusion is based on are ethical and laudatory, there will always be question about the effectiveness in the classroom. 

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The power of inclusion: Aaron DeVries

Inclusion of students with disabilities in the general education classroom is powerful. It not only benefits those students with disabilities but also their ...
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Parent to a child with a physically handicapped disability, Aaron DeVries gives his insight at an independently organized TED event on the power of inclusion. He states that “A community that excludes even one member is not a community at all.” Mr. DeVries makes sure that his daughter is included in all of the school related activities she desires. 

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Op-Ed: An Argument Against Mainstreaming Kids With Disabilities

Op-Ed: An Argument Against Mainstreaming Kids With Disabilities | Issues in Special Education | Scoop.it
A special education teacher shares why she believes students with special needs thrive in schools solely for kids with disabilities.
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This special education teacher explains why she believes it is better for students with disabilities to be in an environment where they are surrounded by other students with special needs. She has seen that development is seen most powerful when children are working alongside those who are intellectually similar and who understand each other’s needs.

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Parent Primer: Placing Special Needs Children in the Inclusive Class — National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities

Parent Primer: Placing Special Needs Children in the Inclusive Class — National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities | Issues in Special Education | Scoop.it
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Nicole Eredics, elementary educator and parent advocate, has developed numerous strategies and teachings aiding in the implementation of the inclusive classroom. She hosts a talk show blog, on which she discusses concerns and answers questions about full inclusive classrooms. A classroom is considered full inclusive when students with special needs are educated alongside those without any disabilities. Instead of grouping students in separate rooms to receive services, accommodations are brought into the classroom and are integrated into the daily routine of all students. Eredics is a full inclusion teacher, who through her teaching has learned just how beneficial full inclusion is. She claims that the benefits of inclusion reach to all students, teachers, schools, and communities involved. An understanding of equality and diversity develops within students through the social interaction and the relationships built in the inclusive classroom. With the positive support of peers and teachers, self-esteem and confidence will naturally grow in special needs individuals who learn with other students.
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Inclusion: The Right Thing for All Students

Inclusion: The Right Thing for All Students | Issues in Special Education | Scoop.it
In an open letter to the New York City schools' chief academic officer, Shael Polakow-Suransky, a disabilities expert argues that integrating special education students into the general classroom is a proven method that improves the education both of children with disabilities and those without.
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Many educational reformers are now beginning to believe that it is morally wrong to separate students with disabilities from the regular educational classroom. Dr. Cheryl Jorgensen argues this idea in a letter she wrote to the chief academic officer of New York City. Jorgensen has been advocating the push for inclusion for many years. She is a member of the National Center on Inclusive Education at the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire, and in 2008, she received the National Down Syndrome Congress Education Award for her new and extensive research and leadership in support of the inclusion of students with Down Syndrome. The basis of inclusion is founded upon the idea of social justice. The belief is that the academic and social achievement of students with special needs will increase when they are placed in a regular classroom. The National Longitudinal Transition Study proved the effectiveness of inclusion based on the increase in test scores of students who had learned in the regular classroom. Not only are academic achievements made, values and attitudes are learned throughout the classroom when students are educated together. The hope is that when engaging and learning the general curriculum in the company of their peers, students will naturally begin to feel welcomed as valued members of the classroom. 

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