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Do the right thing; support marriage equality in Illinois - Quad City Times

Do the right thing; support marriage equality in Illinois - Quad City Times | Isaac, Dammit | Scoop.it
Do the right thing; support marriage equality in Illinois
Quad City Times
As longtime supporters, we strongly urge you to support same-sex marriage.
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Alt-Aesthetics invites you to explore an alternative space to art..
Enjoy and purchase non-conventional art originals by emerging UK artists.
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Looking for an Instagram alternative? - Los Angeles Times

Looking for an Instagram alternative? - Los Angeles Times | Isaac, Dammit | Scoop.it
Los Angeles Times
Looking for an Instagram alternative?
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Tweet @whitehouse: The decision on whether to continue a pregnancy is essential to a woman's equality & dignity www.aclu.org/AskObama3 - via @ACLU

Tweet @whitehouse: The decision on whether to continue a pregnancy is essential to a woman's equality & dignity www.aclu.org/AskObama3 - via @ACLU | Isaac, Dammit | Scoop.it
RT @ACLU: Tweet Pres #Obama: The decision on whether to continue a pregnancy is essential to a woman's equality & dignity http://t.co/5iZb1w2c
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35 Shocking Facts That Prove That College Education Has Become A Giant Money Making Scam

35 Shocking Facts That Prove That College Education Has Become A Giant Money Making Scam | Isaac, Dammit | Scoop.it
Here is an artile that brings up an alternative view on the pay-back of an American college education and the... http://t.co/FpZs1XA5
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Theodore Roosevelt Speech - Social and Industrial Justice

This speech contains excerpts from "A Confession of Faith," an address originally delivered to the national convention of the Progressive party in Chicago on August 6, 1912.

 

Transcription: 

 

Our prime concern is that in dealing with the fundamental law of the land, in assuming finally to interpret it, and therefore finally to make it, the acts of the courts should be subject to and not above the final control of the people as a whole. I deny that the American people have surrendered to any set of men, no matter what their position or their character, the final right to determine those fundamental questions upon which free self-government ultimately depends.

 

The people themselves must be the ultimate makers of their own Constitution, and where their agents differ in their interpretations of the Constitution the people themselves should be given the chance, after full and deliberate judgment, authoritatively to settle what interpretation it is that their representatives shall thereafter adopt as binding.


We do not question the general honesty of the courts. But in applying to present-day social conditions the general prohibitions that were intended originally as safeguards to the citizen against the arbitrary power of government in the hands of caste and privilege, these prohibitions have been turned by the courts from safeguards against political and social privilege into barriers against political and social justice and advancement.


Our purpose is not to impugn the courts, but to emancipate them from a position where they stand in the way of social justice; and to emancipate the people, in an orderly way, from the iniquity of enforced submission to a doctrine which would turn constitutional provisions which were intended to favor social justice and advancement into prohibitions against such justice and advancement.


In the last twenty years an increasing percentage of our people have come to depend on industry for their livelihood, so that today the wage-workers in industry rank in importance side by side with the tillers of the soil. As a people we cannot afford to let any group of citizens or any individual citizen live or labor under conditions which are injurious to the common welfare. Industry, therefore, must submit to such public regulation as will make it a means of life and health, not of death or inefficiency. We must protect the crushable elements at the base of our present industrial structure.


We stand for a living wage. Wages are subnormal if they fail to provide a living for those who devote their time and energy to industrial occupations. The monetary equivalent of a living wage varies according to local conditions, but must include enough to secure the elements of a normal standard of living--a standard high enough to make morality possible, to provide for education and recreation, to care for immature members of the family, to maintain the family during periods of sickness, and to permit a reasonable saving for old age.


Hours are excessive if they fail to afford the worker sufficient time to recuperate and return to his work thoroughly refreshed. We hold that the night labor of women and children is abnormal and should be prohibited; we hold that the employment of women over forty-eight hours per week is abnormal and should be prohibited. We hold that the seven-day working week is abnormal, and we hold that one day of rest in seven should be provided by law. We hold that the continuous industries, operating twenty-four hours out of twenty-four, are abnormal, and where, because of public necessity or for technical reasons (such as molten metal), the twenty-four hours must be divided into two shifts of twelve hours or three shifts of eight, they should by law be divided into three of eight.

 

 

Transcription from the Library of Congress:http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/troosevelt_film/trfpcp.html#page_content


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lexi shea's curator insight, February 11, 2015 2:03 PM

a speech he gave