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From the Well Short Story Competition 2018

From the Well Short Story Competition 2018 | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
The Cork County Library and Arts Service is launching the From the Well Short Story competition 2018  The competition invites entries from writers aged 18 and over who are registered library members in any country. Twenty stories will be shortlisted by writer Billy O’Callaghan and will be announced end of April 2018 A winner from…
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The Irish Literary Times
Up-to-Date Coverage of The World of Irish Literature
Curated by Gerard Beirne
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The Irish Literary Times

The Irish Literary Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it

The Irish Literary Times provides up-to-date coverage of Irish literary news and events in a magazine format via articles available online.

 

The site is curated by Gerard Beirne an Irish poet and novelist based in Sligo. He has published six books of poetry and fiction. His novel The Eskimo in the Net (Marion Boyars Publishers) was shortlisted for the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Award and was selected by the Literary Editor of the Daily Express  as his Book of the Year “scandalously ignored by the Man Booker judges...”. His recent collection of stories was shortlisted for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award.

 

http://www.gerardbeirne.com

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Janet Fraser's comment, June 9, 2013 8:34 PM
Congratulations, Gerard. That's great.
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Man Booker winner Anna Burns on her own extraordinary story from mitching school, the Troubles and giving up alcohol

Man Booker winner Anna Burns on her own extraordinary story from mitching school, the Troubles and giving up alcohol | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
She laughs when I tell her the INLA joke. It’s what the initials stand for: I Never Leave Ardoyne. “Fantastic,” she says. Anna Burns says that her book Milkman is not specifically about
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Bram Stoker festival: Everything you need to know

Bram Stoker festival: Everything you need to know | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Fangs for the legacy as Dublin celebrates the creator of Dracula, the supernatural and Samhain
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Linda Anderson’s Cuckoo: a timely reissue

Linda Anderson’s Cuckoo: a timely reissue | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
This political novel weaves a feminist perspective around the North’s civil rights legacy
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‘I am a poet without a landscape, a woman poet without a narrative heritage’

‘I am a poet without a landscape, a woman poet without a narrative heritage’ | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Christine Murray, founder of Poethead, on the inspiration for her new collection ‘bind’...
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Ailbhe Darcy  - Insistence | Bloodaxe Books

Ailbhe Darcy  - Insistence | Bloodaxe Books | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Shortlisted for the T S Eliot Prize 2018 A new child should mean new hope. But what if that’s no longer so? Ailbhe Darcy’s second collection unfolds in an intimate world, in which the words home and love dominate. But the private world is threatened by a public one. Written in the American Rust Belt, in an era of climate change and upheaval, Insistence takes stock of the parent’s responsibility to her child, the poet’s responsibility to the reader, and the vulnerability of the person in the face of global crisis. In a long poem, Darcy revisits Inger Christensen’s 1981 alphabet, a work which expresses the heart-sickening persistence and proliferation of beauty after Hiroshima. In Darcy’s ‘Alphabet', the spiralling form takes over, insisting on hope. But this is a doubtful sort of hope: hope for life on earth, not necessarily human life. Stink bugs work their way across America, cockroaches waltz, and quixotically-named mushrooms rise from the earth in this flirtatious but volatile collection. Described by David Wheatley as ‘boldly overhauling the received categories of the Irish poem’ with ‘cunning and humour’, Ailbhe Darcy’s poems interrogate cosmopolitanism as much as they do rootedness, love as much as grief. ‘Insistence includes a remarkable long sequence, Alphabet, which derives its unusual poetic form from the Danish poet Inger Christensen’s alphabetical, accumulating sequence (also named Alphabet). Darcy’s sequence oscillates between doomy prognostication... and scattered consolations.’ – John McAuliffe, The Irish Times 'In the face of terrible knowledge, Darcy has managed the almost impossible here: a collection that, though written in time, seems to go on for all time. In Darcy’s fierce, word-shifting hands the future of poetry seems certain, even if nothing else is.' – Maria Johnston, BodyLit [on Insistence] Ailbhe Darcy’s first collection, Imaginary Menagerie, was published by Bloodaxe in 2011: ‘This is Irish poetry progressing – acknowledging the narrative tradition, but making the language entirely new.’ – Jennifer Matthews, Poetry International. ‘Approaching the world as they do with open hands, it is the good fortune of Darcy’s poems to find the globe dropping unbidden into their palms. This is intelligent, eloquent and durable work, offering portents of many rewarding instalments to come.’ – David Wheatley, The Wake Forest Introduction to Irish Poetry, Vol IV.   Ailbhe Darcy reads from Insistence at Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts In this excerpt from Ailbhe Darcy’s reading (with Finuala Dowling) at Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts on 11 October 2018, she reads six poems from Insistence: ‘Nice’, ‘After my son was born’, ‘A guided tour of the house and its environs’, ‘Ansel Adams’ Aspens’, ‘Silver’ and ’Still’.   Ailbhe Darcy reads ‘After my son was born’ This video is an excerpt from the one above and shows Ailbhe Darcy reading her poem ‘After my son was born’ from Insistence.   Ailbhe Darcy reads ‘Nice’ This video is an excerpt from the fuller video above and shows Ailbhe Darcy reading her poem ‘Nice’ from Insistence.   × Paperback £9.95 ISBN: 9781780370781 E-book £8.95 ISBN: 9781780371696
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Emerging Writer: Strokestown International poetry Competition 2019

Emerging Writer: Strokestown International poetry Competition 2019 | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Emergingwriter blogs about writing mainly in Ireland. Kate Dempsey writes short stories, poetry and prose and runs the Poetry Divas.
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Dublin Book Festival

Dublin Book Festival | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Dave Rudden is the author of the award-winning Knights of the Borrowed Dark  trilogy, as well as the upcoming Doctor Who anthology Twelve Angels Weeping with BBC Books.He enjoys peril, good beard …...
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Anna Burns: from rank outsider to No 1 bestseller

Anna Burns: from rank outsider to No 1 bestseller | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
A sneak preview of tomorrow’s books pages...
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Prize-winning author’s gratitude to Sussex charity and food bank - Chichester Observer

Prize-winning author’s gratitude to Sussex charity and food bank - Chichester Observer | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
A Sussex housing charity and a food bank are saluted for their support in this year’s Man Booker prize-winning book.
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Milkman sales soar after Man Booker Prize win

Milkman sales soar after Man Booker Prize win | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Anna Burns became the first Northern Irish author to win the Man Booker prize.
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"To please and to reform mankind" a life of protest: Jonathan Swift, 1667-1745

"To please and to reform mankind" a life of protest: Jonathan Swift, 1667-1745 | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Exhibition and Lunchtime Lectures commemorating the 350th anniversary of Jonathan Swift's birth now available has an online exhibition.
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Becoming Belle review : Reviewed: Becoming Belle by Nuala O'Connor

Becoming Belle review : Reviewed: Becoming Belle by Nuala O'Connor | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
A Victorian-era tale of one woman's ambition on the London stage whose life is beset by scandal and redeemed by ultimate triumph, Nuala O'Connor's new novel is inspired by the real-life Isabel Bilton.
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Portadown's Pulitzer Prize-winner on Van Morrison, MLA pay and Donald Trump

Portadown's Pulitzer Prize-winner on Van Morrison, MLA pay and Donald Trump | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Portadown's Pulitzer Prize-winner Paul Muldoon, who's been hailed as one of the world's most gifted poets since the war, sips his green tea gingerly as he starts to talk about his newes
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‘The streets are haunted’ – Colm Tóibín explores literary Dublin | Books | The Guardian

‘The streets are haunted’ – Colm Tóibín explores literary Dublin | Books | The Guardian | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
The house where Oscar Wilde grew up and where James Joyce was let down, the library where WB Yeats studied … the Irish capital is full with the ghosts of great writers
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Medbh McGuckian and John Kelly bring sensuous pleasure and maturity in their poems

Medbh McGuckian and John Kelly bring sensuous pleasure and maturity in their poems | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Medbh McGuckian and John Kelly bring sensuous pleasure and maturity in their poems
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Hate the English - Irish writer’s searing column in NY Times

Hate the English - Irish writer’s searing column in NY Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
London-based Irish writer Megan Nolan has written a powerful and profound Op-Ed piece in The New York Times on how her attitude to the British has turned into anger and disgust given their disdain for the Irish.
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Book Club = Anna Burns

The best novel in English. Anna Burns was clearly shocked that she won the Man Booker Prize in London on Tuesday night -- and she wasn’t the only one. (Read the news here.) The 56-year-old Northern Irish author took the $66,000 prize for her third novel, “Milkman.” It’s about an 18-year-old woman who gets harassed by a paramilitary man during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Burns beat out Canadian favorite Esi Edugyan (“Washington Black”) and such American heavy-weights as Richard Powers (“The Overstory”) and Rachel Kushner (“The Mars Room”). Unfortunately, “Milkman” isn’t available in the United States -- it was scheduled for fall of 2019 -- but as soon as the Booker Prize news broke, U.S. publisher Graywolf moved the release up to Dec. 11. That still feels like a long time to wait to see what all the fuss is about.    Unsheathed. What a difference a few months make. Earlier this year, Barbara Kingsolver’s new novel, “Unsheltered,” was featured on everybody’s list of Most Anticipated Books. But now that we’ve actually read “Unsheltered,” it’s taking a beating. Some Other East Coast Newspaper calls it “dead on arrival.” The Atlantic says it’s “the American-family novel as Sunday-morning talk show — a character drama with no real characters, only sound bites masquerading as human beings.” I was gentler but had to admit that the novel “offers a collage of Democratic talking points acted out in the lives of a middle-class family slipping down the ladder of success.” That said, I found much to enjoy in “Unsheltered,” and if you’re in a book club, this novel should generate great discussion about politics, science and the culture wars. (Read the review.) It’s Alive! Every Halloween is special, of course, but this one marks the 200th anniversary of “Frankenstein.” A vivid new edition from Penguin, part of a six-volume series of horror introduced by Guillermo del Toro, gave me an excuse to reread Mary Shelley’s classic earlier this month, and it was so much more dramatic and stirring than I remembered from high school! Now I’m dying to see the exhibit at the Morgan Library in New York, “It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200” (through Jan. 27, 2019). There’s also a fine new biography this year by Fiona Sampson called “In Search of Mary Shelley” (read the review), and I’m curious about “Making the Monster: The Science Behind Mary Shelley's Frankenstein,” by Kathryn Harkup. As Igor discovered, once you start digging, you just can’t stop.    Best Crypt. The Ghost Box is back for a second year, and it’s my top recommendation for Halloween book-giving. Once again, comedian Patton Oswalt has selected a fantastic group of short stories that come separately bound in a classy black box suitable for burial. (Here’s how this project started.) Dead or alive, your loved ones will appreciate this macabre collection. Many of these authors made their contributions from beyond the grave, such as Patricia Highsmith, whose hilariously creepy story “The Quest for Blank Claveringi” describes a scientist hunting for giant snails. (He finds them -- and they find him.) Other contributors include Harlan Ellison, Louisa Baldwin and Michael Shea. Tananarive Due’s “The Lake” is about a girl turning into a sea monster. Stephen King’s “Gray Matter” might make you give up beer forever. And his son Joe Hill offers “Abraham’s Boys,” a shockingly clever vampire story. In his introduction, Oswalt writes, “When we’re terrified about the enormity of the universe’s indifference, and our smallness in the face of it, we tell stories.” At the very least these stories will take your mind off those larger horrors. You can only order the limited edition Ghost Box from Canadian publisher Hingston & Olsen (about $44, shipping included) -- so get off your broomstick and do it now. Open to All. “The Library Book,” by Susan Orlean, has made me think about how libraries deal with poverty. (Read the review.) Last Sunday, I was waiting with eight homeless people for the Nashville Library to open. It was cool and rainy, so we’d taken refuge under a ledge. One older man was in a wheelchair. An elderly woman standing with a walker erupted in brief giggles every few minutes. The only movement among us was a wiry young man darting about asking if anybody needed a sandwich or a jacket. He declined to tell me his real name. “We have to have a level of safety because right-wing people do attack us,” he said. He goes by the name Crash. “I read Kerouac at the age of 13, and it just changed my whole perspective on stuff.” After open-heart surgery, two years ago he joined a group of anarchists who live on a farm. He comes to the library to offer the “unhoused” food, clothing and basic first aid. “We normally feed about 80 to 85 people on a Sunday,” he said. “They stay here because the library lets them come in.” The biggest challenge he faces is the police. They regularly run him off. An officer told one of his anarchist friends, “You think you’re helping, but you’re not. You’re like one of those old ladies that feeds cats.” “Well, these aren’t cats,” she told the officer. “These are humans.” Black Lives Matter. My friend Jabari Asim, a former Book World editor, released a fantastic essay collection this week called “We Can’t Breathe: On Black Lives, White Lives, and the Art of Survival” (Picador). Blending personal reflection with historical analysis and cultural and literary criticism, these essays are a sharp, illuminating response to the nation’s continuing racial conflicts. “It's time to replace the timid discourse of pragmatic centrism with the aggressive language our situation requires,” Asim writes. “Unlike Barack Obama, who spent both terms of his presidency hamstrung by conventional notions of propriety and understandably wary of coming off as ‘an angry black man,’ the rest of us have license to speak freely -- and speak out.”   Go West! I’m off to St. Louis this weekend to visit classes at my alma mater and deliver a lecture with the rather grandiose title, “Novels: The Anti-Twitter We Need Right Now.” It'll be great to see my old home town, but I’m sorry to miss some incredible literary events in the Washington area: On Friday night, Oct. 19, playwright and poet Ntozake Shange and professor and editor Charles Henry Rowell will be honored at the Hurston/Wright Foundation Legacy Awards Ceremony. (Tickets are still available.) And on Saturday, Oct. 20, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Richard Russo will be the honored guest, speaker and teacher at the F. Scott Fitzgerald Literary Festival. (Tickets are still available.)  If you have any questions or comments about this weekly newsletter, write to me at ron.charles@washpost.com. John Grisham’s new novel wades into Mississippi’s racist past “The Reckoning” brings us back to Clanton, Miss., where a war veteran shoots a popular minister Read more »     Yes, Pete Souza is throwing shade at Trump. Now there’s a whole book of it. The photographer’s book “Shade” juxtaposes recent news events with photos of his former boss Barack Obama. Read more »   3 books to help kids of all ages cope with the challenges life throws their way “Hey, Kiddo,” “Blue” and “A Very Large Expanse of Sea” explore sadness, loss, prejudice — and hope. Read more »   A look back at the ‘supreme hostess’ of the American gilded age Therese Anne Fowler’s “A Well-Behaved Woman” takes a gimlet-eyed view of high-society life. Read more » Top Nonfiction Picks   How Trump captured working class voters and how the Democrats lost them Ben Bradlee Jr. looks closely at one county in Pennsylvania to uncover voters’ choices. Read more »   The story behind some of the world’s most awe-inspiring magic tricks “Empire of Enchantment” explores magic’s roots in India (though you’ll have to forgive the typos). Read more »   Looking beyond the walls of famous homes Through a survey of modern homes, “The Iconic House” examines how architecture reflects culture. Read more »   Tina Turner looks back on her horrific first marriage — and much more — in ‘My Love Story’ The singer describes how she went from being a victimof domestic abuse to the face of empowerment. Read more »   More News How Trump captured working class voters and how the Democrats lost them Ben Bradlee Jr. looks closely at one county in Pennsylvania to uncover voters’ choices. Read more »   Share Book Club:    Twitter     Facebook Trouble reading? Click here to view in your browser. You received this email because you signed up for Book Club or because it is included in your subscription. Manage my email newsletters and alerts Privacy Policy | Help ©2018 The Washington Post  |  1301 K St NW, Washington DC 20071
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Milkman by Anna Burns — Booker winner with a sour taste | The Times

Milkman by Anna Burns — Booker winner with a sour taste | The Times | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Anna Burns’s novel Milkman, which won the Man Booker prize this week, is a tough read.Kwame Anthony Appiah, the chairman of the judges, said: “I spend my time reading articles in the Journal of Philosophy, so by my standards this is not too hard.” Unfortunately, most things are more fun than acade...
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Anna Burns: Milkman by Southbank Centre's Book Podcast | Free Listening on

Winner of the Man Booker Prize 2018, Anna Burns talks to Ted Hodgkinson about how she went about creating a story that won one of the most prestigious prizes in literature, why her characters don't ne...
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Anna Burns' Booker Prize win shows the real cost of being a writer in 2018

Anna Burns' Booker Prize win shows the real cost of being a writer in 2018 | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Turn to the back page of Anna Burns’ Milkman and you will see something unusual. In the acknowledgements, the winner of this year’s Booker Prize thanks the committee at Lewes District Churches Homelink, Newhaven Food Bank and the Housing and Council Tax Benefit system.
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Faber and Faber : Milkman

Faber and Faber : Milkman | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Milkman is a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness. It is the story of inaction with enormous consequences.
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Two Aosdána poets calling for artists to take over cultural capital project’s creative leadership - Galway 2020: no sponsorship raised in six months and almost €130,000 spent on fees

Two Aosdána poets calling for artists to take over cultural capital project’s creative leadership - Galway 2020: no sponsorship raised in six months and almost €130,000 spent on fees | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Two Aosdána poets calling for artists to take over cultural capital project’s creative leadership
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A Profound Poetic Pilgrimage-
Dear Pilgrims, by John F Deane

A Profound Poetic Pilgrimage-<br/>Dear Pilgrims, by John F Deane | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
John F Deane is a poet who lives history, who breathes at one with the world around him. He reminds the reader that we live only for a short while on this rock in space but that that time is precious and profound. We are all dear pilgrims – whether we realise it or not.
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Galway 2020: Poet Rita Ann Higgins compares it to Dante’s Inferno

Galway 2020: Poet Rita Ann Higgins compares it to Dante’s Inferno | The Irish Literary Times | Scoop.it
Higgins calls for team of local artists to be appointed to provide creative lead
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