Iran Commentary
42 views | +0 today
Follow
Iran Commentary
Tracking geo-political and military developments in Iran. Iran's quest for nuclear independence and the Shia Sunni rivalry in the Persian Gulf and the AfPak region post NATO troop withdrawal in 2014
Curated by Iran Watch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

#Iran hangs 16 in reprisal for #Pakistan border killings

#Iran hangs 16 in reprisal for #Pakistan border killings | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Iran said it executed 16 "rebels" Saturday in reprisal after gunmen killed at least 14 border guards near the border with Pakistan, in a rugged area often rocked by violence.

The ambush happened overnight in the mountains of Sistan-Baluchestan, a province in southeastern Iran.

The province is home to a large community of minority Sunni Muslims, unlike the rest of Shiite-dominated Iran, where drug traffickers and Sunni militants operate.

"Fourteen border guards were killed during armed clashes in the region of Saravan, and five others were wounded," the official IRNA news agency said, citing what it called an informed source.

The unnamed source identified the gunmen as "bandits or rebels opposed to the Islamic republic".

But Deputy Interior Minister Ali Abdollahi said the guards were killed in an ambush set by Iranians who were "members of hostile groups".

"Three soldiers have been taken hostage and taken to the other side of the border in Pakistan," he said, adding Iran would "take measures to secure their release".

In retaliation for the attack, the Iranian authorities said they hanged 16 "rebels" held at a prison in the region.

Iran Watch's insight:

FYI: Pakistan is the world most fenced in country. As this article reminds us towards the end, " Officials say Iran has spent millions of dollars to build a "wall" along lengthy stretches of its 1,700-kilometre (1,050-mile) eastern border with Afghanistan and Pakistan in a bid to stop the trafficking."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Iranian Ship, in Plain View but Shrouded in Mystery, Looks Very Familiar to U.S.

Iranian Ship, in Plain View but Shrouded in Mystery, Looks Very Familiar to U.S. | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Iran is building a nonworking mock-up of an American nuclear-powered aircraft carrier that United States officials say may be intended to be blown up for propaganda value.

 

Intelligence analysts studying satellite photos of Iranian military installations first noticed the vessel rising from the Gachin shipyard, near Bandar Abbas on the Persian Gulf, last summer. The ship has the same distinctive shape and style of the Navy’s Nimitz-class carriers, as well as the Nimitz’s number 68 neatly painted in white near the bow. Mock aircraft can be seen on the flight deck.

 

The Iranian mock-up, which American officials described as more like a barge than a warship, has no nuclear propulsion system and is only about two-thirds the length of a typical 1,100-foot-long Navy carrier. Intelligence officials do not believe that Iran is capable of building an actual aircraft carrier.

 

“Based on our observations, this is not a functioning aircraft carrier; it’s a large barge built to look like an aircraft carrier,” said Cmdr. Jason Salata, a spokesman for the Navy’s Fifth Fleet in Bahrain, across the Persian Gulf from Iran. “We’re not sure what Iran hopes to gain by building this. If it is a big propaganda piece, to what end?”

 

Whatever the purpose, American officials acknowledged on Thursday that they wanted to reveal the existence of the vessel to get out ahead of the Iranians.

Navy and other American intelligence analysts surmise that the vessel, which Fifth Fleet wags have nicknamed the Target Barge, is something that Iran could tow to sea, anchor and blow up — while filming the whole thing to make a propaganda point, if, say, the talks with the Western powers over Iran’s nuclear program go south.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Iran Watch from The Masters of the Middle East: Iran Vs Saudi Arabia
Scoop.it!

Annual Report on the Death Penalty in Iran- 2013

Annual Report on the Death Penalty in Iran- 2013 | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it

Iran Human Rights (IHR) launched its sixth annual report on the death penalty in Iran at the British Parliament (House of Lords) on Tuesday March 11th. The report was launched with the support of the  All–Party Parliamentary Groups on the Abolition of the Death Penalty and Human Rights,  and Together against the death penalty (Ensemble contre la peine de mort – ECPM).

 

The sixth annual report on the death penalty in Iran gives an assessment of how the death penalty was implemented in 2013 in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Quick findings of the report:

 

At least 687 people were executed in 2013 in Iran, a 16% increase compared to 2012;

388 cases (56%) were reported by the official Iranian sources,

458 executions (68%) were carried out in the months after the election of Mr. Rouhani;

59 executions were performed in public;

331 people were executed for drug-related charges, 25% lower than in 2012;

148 people who were executed were charged with murder (qisas), 8 times higher than in 2012;

Charges in 114 cases were unknown;

At least 30 women were executed in 2013;

At least 3 juvenile offenders were among those executed in 2013;

At least 299 executions in 21 different prisons were either not officially announced or were carried out secretly;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Syria, Iran and the Balance of Power in the Middle East - Originally By: STRATFOR

Syria, Iran and the Balance of Power in the Middle East - Originally By: STRATFOR | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it

Dated Nov 22, 2011. But relevant none the less:


U.S. troops are in the process of completing their withdrawal from Iraq by the end-of-2011 deadline. We are now moving toward a reckoning with the consequences. The reckoning concerns the potential for a massive shift in the balance of power in the region, with Iran moving from a fairly marginal power to potentially a dominant power. As the process unfolds, the United States and Israel are making countermoves. We have discussed all of this extensively. Questions remain whether these countermoves will stabilize the region and whether or how far Iran will go in its response.

 

ran has been preparing for the U.S. withdrawal. While it is unreasonable simply to say that Iran will dominate Iraq, it is fair to say Tehran will have tremendous influence in Baghdad to the point of being able to block Iraqi initiatives Iran opposes. This influence will increase as the U.S. withdrawal concludes and it becomes clear there will be no sudden reversal in the withdrawal policy. Iraqi politicians’ calculus must account for the nearness of Iranian power and the increasing distance and irrelevance of American power.

Resisting Iran under these conditions likely would prove ineffective and dangerous. Some, like the Kurds, believe they have guarantees from the Americans and that substantial investment in Kurdish oil by American companies means those commitments will be honored. A look at the map, however, shows how difficult it would be for the United States to do so. The Baghdad regime has arrested Sunni leaders while the Shia, not all of whom are pro-Iranian by any means, know the price of overenthusiastic resistance.

Syria and Iran

The situation in Syria complicates all of this. The minority Alawite sect has dominated the Syrian government since 1970, when the current president’s father — who headed the Syrian air force — staged a coup. The Alawites are a heterodox Muslim sect related to a Shiite offshoot and make up about 7 percent of the country’s population, which is mostly Sunni. The new Alawite government was Nasserite in nature, meaning it was secular, socialist and built around the military. When Islam rose as a political force in the Arab world, the Syrians — alienated from the Sadat regime in Egypt — saw Iran as a bulwark. The Iranian Islamist regime gave the Syrian secular regime immunity against Shiite fundamentalists in Lebanon. The Iranians also gave Syria support in its external adventures in Lebanon, and more important, in its suppression of Syria’s Sunni majority.

Syria and Iran were particularly aligned in Lebanon. In the early 1980s, after the Khomeini revolution, the Iranians sought to increase their influence in the Islamic world by supporting radical Shiite forces. Hezbollah was one of these. Syria had invaded Lebanon in 1975 on behalf of the Christians and opposed the Palestine Liberation Organization, to give you a sense of the complexity. Syria regarded Lebanon as historically part of Syria, and sought to assert its influence over it. Via Iran, Hezbollah became an instrument of Syrian power in Lebanon.

Iran and Syria, therefore, entered a long-term if not altogether stable alliance that has lasted to this day. In the current unrest in Syria, the Saudis and Turks in addition to the Americans all have been hostile to the regime of President Bashar al Assad. Iran is the one country that on the whole has remained supportive of the current Syrian government.

There is good reason for this. Prior to the uprising, the precise relationship between Syria and Iran was variable. Syria was able to act autonomously in its dealings with Iran and Iran’s proxies in Lebanon. While an important backer of groups like Hezbollah, the al Assad regime in many ways checked Hezbollah’s power in Lebanon, with the Syrians playing the dominant role there. The Syrian uprising has put the al Assad regime on the defensive, however, making it more interested in a firm, stable relationship with Iran. Damascus finds itself isolated in the Sunni world, with Turkey and the Arab League against it. Iran — and intriguingly, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki — have constituted al Assad’s exterior support.

Thus far al Assad has resisted his enemies. Though some mid- to low-ranking Sunnis have defected, his military remains largely intact; this is because the Alawites control key units. Events in Libya drove home to an embattled Syrian leadership — and even to some of its adversaries within the military — the consequences of losing. The military has held together, and an unarmed or poorly armed populace, no matter how large, cannot defeat an intact military force. The key for those who would see al Assad fall is to divide the military.

If al Assad survives — and at the moment, wishful thinking by outsiders aside, he is surviving — Iran will be the big winner. If Iraq falls under substantial Iranian influence, and the al Assad regime — isolated from most countries but supported by Tehran — survives in Syria, then Iran could emerge with a sphere of influence stretching from western Afghanistan to the Mediterranean (the latter via Hezbollah). Achieving this would not require deploying Iranian conventional forces — al Assad’s survival alone would suffice. 

  




Iran Watch's insight:

 George Friedman Concludes:

 

"But it is not the last move. To put Iran back into its box, something must be done about the Iraqi political situation. Given the U.S. withdrawal, Washington has little influence there. All of the relationships the United States built were predicated on American power protecting the relationships. With the Americans gone, the foundation of those relationships dissolves. And even with Syria, the balance of power is shifting.

The United States has three choices. Accept the evolution and try to live with what emerges. Attempt to make a deal with Iran — a very painful and costly one. Or go to war. The first assumes Washington can live with what emerges. The second depends on whether Iran is interested in dealing with the United States. The third depends on having enough power to wage a war and to absorb Iran’s retaliatory strikes, particularly in the Strait of Hormuz. All are dubious, so toppling al Assad is critical. It changes the game and the momentum. But even that is enormously difficult and laden with risks.

We are now in the final act of Iraq, and it is even more painful than imagined. Laying this alongside the European crisis makes the idea of a systemic crisis in the global system very real."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

The Impending Clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia - Right Side News

The Impending Clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia - Right Side News | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
The Impending Clash between Iran and Saudi Arabia Right Side News The cleric's radical religious teachings, which are based on government in the hands of mullahs and a foreign policy of exporting the Islamic Revolution, still define Iranian policy...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Correcting the Mainstream Distortion of Iran's 1979 Revolution - The Real News Network

Correcting the Mainstream Distortion of Iran's 1979 Revolution - The Real News Network | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Correcting the Mainstream Distortion of Iran's 1979 Revolution The Real News Network He is also the author of over 100 essays, articles and book reviews on subjects ranging from Iranian Studies, medieval and modern Islam, and comparative literature...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Iran Watch from Palestine
Scoop.it!

Obama’s Post-American World

Obama’s Post-American World | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
What do the riots in the Ukraine, Iran throwing its weight around in the Persian Gulf and China’s new air defense zone all have in common? Barack Obama and his Post-American world.
Nations exercise power within spheres of influence.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Iran Analysis: Supreme Leader's Political Strategy Behind "Resistance Economy" - EA WorldView

Iran Analysis: Supreme Leader's Political Strategy Behind "Resistance Economy" - EA WorldView | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
What is Supreme Leader's political strategy behind his call for a "resistance economy"?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Taking an Iran Option Off the Table

Taking an Iran Option Off the Table | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
President Obama’s repetitious warning to Iran that “all options are on the table” carries with it the implicit threat of a nuclear strike against a n...
Iran Watch's insight:

President Obama’s repetitious warning to Iran that “all options are on the table” carries with it the implicit threat of a nuclear strike against a non-nuclear state, a violation of previously declared principles and a provocation that encourages Iran to build an atomic bomb,

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Iran Election Watch 2013: Twenty four presidential candidates emerge

Iran Election Watch 2013: Twenty four presidential candidates emerge | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
The International
Iran Election Watch 2013: Twenty four presidential candidates emerge
The International
This political current controls the Iranian parliament and will be putting forward the greatest number of candidates.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Israel Provided IAEA with Fake Documents on Iran's Nuclear Program

Israel Provided IAEA with Fake Documents on Iran's Nuclear Program | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it

The controversy surrounding Iran’s nuclear program in the recent decade has been the subject of millions of statements, thousands of news stories and articles, hundreds of speeches and interviews and tens of books and films.

One of the most brilliant, revealing and educative books about Iran’s standoff with the West over its civilian nuclear program has been recently published by the prominent American investigative journalist Gareth Porter.

Gareth Porter is a leading American journalist, historian, anti-war activist and correspondent of the Vietnam War. Porter’s writings have appeared on such publications as The Nation, Inter Press Service, The Huffington Post, Truthout, Al-Jazeera, Press TV, Antiwar.com and Common Dreams. Porter is the 2012 winner of Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism, which is awarded annually to a journalist who exposes media propaganda.

 

Gareth Porter has recently published a book titled “Manufactured Crisis: The Untold Story of the Iran Nuclear Scare” which discloses the unseen and masked truths behind the decade-long standoff over Iran’s nuclear program. In this book, Porter endeavors to reveal the destructive role Israel has played in the exacerbation of Iran’s relations with the West over the former’s nuclear activities. Porter maintains that Iran’s nuclear program is completely legal and regularly inspected, abused by the United States and Israel as a pretext for pressuring Iran.

 

The former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia Charles W. Freeman is one of many high-ranking diplomats and academicians who have praised Porter’s book. He writes, “Want to understand why a peaceful U.S. modus vivendi with Iran has been so elusive?  Read this exceptionally timely, gripping account of the Iranian nuclear program and the diplomacy surrounding it! Porter meticulously documents both Iranian misjudgments and American and Israeli diplomatic overreach based on willful self-deception and political, bureaucratic, and budget-motivated cherry-picking of intelligence to support unfounded preconceptions.”

 

On the publication of Gareth Porter’s vital book on Iran’s nuclear program by the Just World Books publications, Iran Review has conducted an exclusive interview with the American journalist and has asked him some questions on the important aspects of Iran’s nuclear program and its ongoing disputes with the West, which seem to be solved gradually during the course of talks between Iran and the P5+1 (five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany.)

Iran Watch's insight:

A must read By Kourosh Ziabari

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Four days in Tehran by Lyse Doucet

Four days in Tehran by Lyse Doucet | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it

Four days in the teeming mega-metropolis of Tehran is not enough. But it was just enough to savour what's long been special about this city.

There were also moments of surprise. And even a short stay was enough to appreciate the enduring centrality and sensitivity of Iran's engagement with the wider world.

Elegant chinar trees still soar over Vali-e-Asr, the avenue reputed to be the longest in the Middle East, possibly the world. Sadly, there are fewer trees now, but their stately presence is still a lovely Tehran landmark.

The infamous traffic congestion seems much worse than on my last visit five years ago. Preparations for the much anticipated New Year (Nowruz) swells the slowly flowing streams. Travel time had to be factored in to every decision about where we would head next.

Magnificent Islamic architecture, with intricate Persian patterns and decorative brickwork still make you pause.

Iran Watch's insight:

Insightful a must read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

A Russo-Iranian Bloc against the United States?

A Russo-Iranian Bloc against the United States? | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
(By Juan Cole) Russian President Vladimir Putin called his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rouhani on Thursday, according to PressTV. The Russian &helip; (A Russo-Iranian Bloc against the United States?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Sunni-Shia split the Mideast's new great divide

Sunni-Shia split the Mideast's new great divide | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it

 By: Olivia Ward Foreign Affairs Reporter

 

Half of believers in the Middle East and North Africa say religious conflict is a major problem for their countries. How did it come to this? Some answers lie in the distant beginnings of Islam.

 

In the not-so-distant past, the doomsday scenario was a cataclysmic “clash of civilizations” between Muslims and the secular West.

But the Arab Spring has brought a seismic shift in the sectarian landscape. With civil war and political chaos rippling through the region, the deadly divide now runs through the Muslim world itself.

In Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain and Iraq, Sunni and Shia Muslims are struggling for power while religious intolerance rises violently in Egypt.

 

Meanwhile, the Sunni Gulf States are fighting proxy battles with Shia Iran for supremacy in the region, with Syria as ground zero.

 

“Violence and brutality have been targeted at particular sects,” says Geneive Abdo, a fellow of the Stimson Center and author of a recent study, The New Sectarianism. “The Syrian war has revived a centuries-old conflict.”

 

In the Middle East and even tranquil Belgium, mosques have been attacked and bombed in acts of sectarian vengeance between Muslims. Worshipers have been wounded and killed. Rival sects revile each other’s faiths and arm militias for escalating battle.

 

Now, some 50 per cent of believers in the Middle East and North Africa say religious conflict is a major problem for their countries, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey of the world’s Muslims.

 

How did it come to this?

more...
Colton and Kenneth's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:43 PM

Africa & Religion

This relates to religion in Africa because it talks of conflicts caused by religion in the middle east and north Africa. 50% of believers think that these disputes are major problems within their countries. Many of then occur because a religion wants a supremacy over an area or region. Hopefully these end soon.

Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

A 'good start' in the final phase of nuclear talks? - Al-Arabiya

A 'good start' in the final phase of nuclear talks?
Al-Arabiya
The first round of high-level negotiations since the Nov.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Insight: Nuclear deal heightens tension between Iran president and Guards - Reuters UK

Insight: Nuclear deal heightens tension between Iran president and Guards - Reuters UK | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Insight: Nuclear deal heightens tension between Iran president and Guards Reuters UK Two things made it stand out: Khatam al Anbia is one of the biggest companies controlled by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) and company head...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

US investigates illegal military equipment shipments from Israel to Iran - Telegraph

US investigates illegal military equipment shipments from Israel to Iran - Telegraph | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
US Homeland Security says Israeli arms dealers have been sending spare military jet parts to Iran in breach of sanctions (#Israel sends military gear to #Iran http://t.co/q2DNw35wBQ but...
Iran Watch's insight:

Military Jet Parts ? What are the Israelis Thinking ? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Understanding the Current State of the Iranian Nuclear Challenge

Understanding the Current State of the Iranian Nuclear Challenge | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Understanding the Current State of the Iranian Nuclear Challenge
Iran Watch's insight:
To produce its first atomic bomb from 20 percent enriched uranium, Iran would need a stockpile of 225 kilograms, which upon further enrichment to the weapons-grade level would yield the 25 kilograms of uranium metal for a nuclear warhead. Since it began enriching 20 percent uranium, Iran had produced 280 kilograms of this material – well above the Israeli red line drawn by Prime Minister Netanyahu. But it had removed a total of 112.6 kilograms of this 20 percent stockpile, leaving itself with a net total of 167 kilograms of 20 percent enriched uranium. This changed the entire timeline of the Iranian bomb, pushing it off from the fall of 2012 to a later date.In May 2011, the IAEA raised concerns about the “possible existence” of seven areas of military research in the Iranian nuclear program, the last of which was the most alarming: “the removal of the conventional high explosive payload from the warhead of the Shahab-3 missile and replacing it with a spherical nuclear payload.” In November 2011, material that the IAEA presented pointed clearly to the fact that Iran wanted to develop a deliverable nuclear weapon. The planned warhead design also underwent studies that investigated how it would operate if it was part of a missile re-entry vehicle and had to stand up to the stress of a missile launch and flying in a ballistic trajectory to its target. The IAEA concluded that “work on the development of an indigenous design of a nuclear weapon including the testing of components” had been executed by the Iranians.Iran is not a status quo power. A few years after he assumed the position of Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei gave a revealing interview to the Iranian daily Ressalat, in which he asked a rhetorical question: “Do we look to preserve the integrity of our land, or do we look to expansion.” He then answered himself, saying: “We must definitely look to expansion.” This world view is still sustained to this day. Khamenei’s senior adviser on military affairs, Major General Yahya Rahim Safavi, who was the previous commander of the Revolutionary Guards, described Iran in 2013 as “the regional superpower” in the Middle East.In the meantime, Iran has substantially increased the number of centrifuges that it installed for uranium enrichment. It also introduced its more advanced centrifuges into its nuclear facilities and it is making progress on its heavy water reactor that will allow it to produce plutonium. Iran, so far, has been careful not to cross the Israeli red line, but that hasn’t prevented it from moving ahead on other aspects of its program. Indeed, just after the last P5+1 talks in Kazakhstan, Tehran announced it was building 3,000 advanced centrifuges that it intended to install at Natanz.Thus, if proposals are to be made that protect the international community as a whole from the threat of Iranian nuclear weapons, they must address other aspects of the program which might become fully operational in the years to come: the plutonium program, weaponization, delivery vehicles, and continuing upgrade of Iran’s centrifuge technology. If negotiations only halt one aspect of the Iranian effort to reach nuclear weapons, while letting the other parts of the program go forward, they may preclude an immediate crisis, but the world will still face a new Iranian challenge in the years ahead.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Iran Watch
Scoop.it!

Iran Election Watch 2013: Twenty four presidential candidates emerge — The International

Iran Election Watch 2013: Twenty four presidential candidates emerge — The International | Iran Commentary | Scoop.it
Iran Watch's insight:

POLITICAL CURRENTS & CANDIDATES

Neo-Principalists

The hardline Persevering Front of the Islamic Revolution (PFIR), the political party representing Neo-Principalists in the Iranian parliament, is considering supporting the first three candidates in this list:

1. Saeed Jalili: Secretary of the Supreme National Security Council and chief nuclear negotiator

2. Parviz Fattah: Former minister of energy (Ahmadinejad administration)

3. Kamran Bagheri-Lankarani: Former minister of health, medical treatment and education (Ahmadinejad administration)

4. Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi: Chief inspector and former minister of interior (Ahmadinejad administration)

Ahmadinejad-Mashaei Current

The following list represents candidates who may represent the political current of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and his Chief of Staff Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei in the upcoming election:

5. Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei: Presidential chief of staff (Ahmadinejad administration)

6. Gholam-Hossein Elham: Presidential deputy for management development and human capital

7. Ali-Akbar Salehi: Foreign Minister (Ahmadinejad administration)

8. Ali Nikzad: Minister of transportation and urban development (Ahmadinejad administration)

Traditional Principalists

This category encompasses a wide range of political groups and politicians operating under the Principalist label. While these groups and politicians are not ideologically and organizationally cohesive except in the most narrow sense, they have been categorized as Traditional Principalists because of broad similarities and to distinguish them from the more hardline Neo-Principalists. This political current controls the Iranian parliament and will be putting forward the greatest number of candidates. The most important group within the Traditional Principalists for this election is the Two Plus One Coalition, comprised of three of this current’s leading politicians who will be working together to win the election. Their coalition agreement mandates that only the most popular of the three will participate in the election, with the two others dropping out to support him. This political current’s candidates include:

9. Ali-Akbar Velayati: The supreme leader’s foreign policy advisor and former foreign minister (Hashemi-Rafsanjani administration)

10. Mohammad-Bagher Ghalibaf: Mayor of Tehran and former national chief of police

11. Gholam-Ali Hadad-Adel: Member of parliament and former speaker of the parliament (Seventh parliament, 2004-2008)

12. Ali Fallahian: Member Assembly of Experts and former Intelligence Minister (Hashemi-Rafsanjani administration)

13. Manouchehr Mottaki: Former foreign minister (Ahmadinejad administration)

14. Mohammad-Reza Bahonar: Deputy speaker of the parliament

15. Mohammad Saeedi-Kia: Minister of housing and urban development who holds the distinction of having served in nearly every presidential cabinet since the Islamic Revolution of 1979

16. Ali-Reza Zakani: Member of parliament

17. Yahya Al-e Eshagh: Head of Tehran Chamber of Commerce

Centrists

The Centrists are led by regime elder statesman former President Ali-Akbar Hashemi-Rafsanjani, who as of yet has not announced his candidacy for the election. This political current’s candidates include:

18. Mohsen Rezaei: Secretary of the Expediency Council and former Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) commander

19. Hassan Rowhani: Head of Expediency Council’s Center for Strategic Studies (CSS) and former secretary of the Supreme National Security Council

Reformists

The Reformists are led by former President Mohammad Khatami, who has not announced his candidacy for the election but has been called upon by 91 Reformists to throw his hat into the ring. As we previously highlighted, the Reformists have been in a tailspin since at least the controversial 2009 Iranian presidential election and are currently divided over the question of whether or not they should renounce the Green Movement and former presidential candidates Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi in order to be allowed to participate in the election. This political current’s candidates include:

20. Mohammad-Reza Aref: Former vice president (Khatami administration), he has stated that he will step aside if Khatami formally enters the presidential election

21. Mohammad Shariatmadari: Former minister of commerce (Khatami administration), he has stated that he will step aside if either former presidents Khatami or Hashemi-Rafsanjani formally enter the presidential election

22. Mostafa Kavakebian: Member of parliament, head of Democracy Party of Iran

23. Hossein Kamali: Former minister of labour and social relations (Khatami administration)

24. Eshagh Jahangiri: Minister of industry and mines (Khatami administration)

 

 

more...
No comment yet.