Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces
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16 skills students need to learn today to thrive tomorrow

16 skills students need to learn today to thrive tomorrow | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Will classes in curiosity, problem-solving and creative thinking soon be on the curriculum? Our latest report thinks it should.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, April 2, 2016 4:02 PM
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Christina's curator insight, April 3, 2016 8:04 PM
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Student Engagement

Student Engagement | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
We share evidence and practitioner-based learning strategies that empower you to improve K-12 education.
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Demco Post: 3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace

Demco Post: 3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Design challenges are a favorite tool of mine for inspiring student creativity in makerspaces (that’s why I co-wrote a book about them).  And by using low-tech materials in combination with design challenges, you can easily and affordably inspire student creativity.  Low-tech materials remind us that a makerspace is not defined by the specific materials and tools they contain, but rather by the learning experiences they create for students.

3 Design Challenges for the Low Tech Makerspace
To help make it easier for you to try out low-tech design challenges, I’ve written up prompts (based off the format in the book), supply lists and recommended resources.  Many of the supplies are things you may already have in your makerspace. If you don’t, you can easily source them.

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Tell Kids to Get Good at Stuff Smart Machines Can't Do (Yet) - GettingSmart

Tell Kids to Get Good at Stuff Smart Machines Can't Do (Yet) - GettingSmart | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

“AI won’t obliterate jobs, but it will transform jobs,” said Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.

Pink said he’s told his own kids to “think about what you can do to augment what AI does—work that only humans can do that smart machines cannot.” That includes:

    * Creativity;


    * Dealing with ambiguity, nuance and poorly defined problems;


    * Understanding other’s emotions and point of view;


    * Developing expertise and sense making; and


    * Identifying reliable sources." 


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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, January 16, 2017 3:58 AM

Education and creativity goes a long way in life.

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5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Here are 5 team building games to try out with your students that also develop critical thinking skills. Collaboration and team spirit await you!
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 14, 2017 8:21 AM
Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, March 18, 2017 12:10 AM
Critical thinking is the most important skill to develop, since in these times of information at hand, we cannot believe everything we see, read, and hear, and that is why it is important to develop this ability as it allows us to be alert and question everything that comes from these means of information. Is a skill that moves a student from concrete ideas to abstract and inferred concepts. Critical thinking allows us to analyze outcomes, compare ideas, identify parallels, sequence events, synthesize information and draw conclusions from a given body of knowledge. Whether it is the proof behind a mathematics formula or an implied tone in an essay, critical thinking skills enable students to solve problems in the real world and on exams in school. Meghan Moll (2014) suggests five tools to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for success on every high school or college test and assignment. 1. Brain games: Recently, websites dedicated to training your brain have enjoyed increased popularity. Lumosity, for example, provides games that aid in improving memory and problem-solving. From timed matching games to order sequence memorization, websites like this can aid in cognition and the ability to ask, "What is the next step?" This skill is critical to learning how to approach complex problems on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT. Rather than playing time-wasting games when you have a lull in your day, search online for brain teasers and peruse the plethora of brain games at your fingertips. 2. Logic puzzles: Before the Internet, puzzles intended to exercise your brain were published in books. Collections of crossword puzzles, logic problems, riddles, sudoku, word problems and word searches can be found at your local bookstore or library. The puzzles in these books are a wonderful strategy to activate different parts of your brain for a round or two of mental gymnastics, and many collections even discuss what each puzzle is meant to target within the mind. 3. Board games: This suggestion may seem strange at first, but do not balk. Choose board games that require more than luck – namely, strategy – for players to win. Any game where players must carefully consider their next move, recognize patterns and remember details will aid in honing critical thinking skills. Certain games like Rubik’s Cube are single-player, while others involve multiple people. Checkers, chess and Mastermind are two-player games that challenge you to plan several steps ahead. Games like Boggle and Scrabble require analyzing information quickly and formulating words, while Clue and Risk test and strengthen your ability to anticipate and react to others’ moves, as well as infer motives. 4. Journaling: Daily reflection – such as maintaining a journal – is a simple way to revisit your day, but it is also a fantastic opportunity to explore ideas. Writing encourages you to expand upon your thoughts and form connections. A journal forces you to slow down and focus on just one or two ideas at a time, which hectic schedules don't otherwise allow. Use your journal to record important ideas and questions and narratives about your life. 5. Book clubs: Students who read for understanding find it far easier to think critically than those who rush to finish. Analyzing a book requires you to delve deeper and ponder complex questions. When reading, think about why the book was written the way it was, what motivates certain characters, and how plot developments may be symbols of foreshadowing. Locate a book club to hone these skills. You will read works you otherwise may not have, and you will learn to examine character development, plot, symbolism and a whole host of other features.
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Character Minutes's curator insight, May 5, 2017 12:47 PM
Great games to use with "ME Leadership" (Marks of Excellence)
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Next Generation of Online Education: “Learn by Doing” in a Digital World

Next Generation of Online Education: “Learn by Doing” in a Digital World | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Because creativity is so critical to success in the 21st century, alongside online education Morgridge says more schools are exploring the maker movement, using 3D printers and allowing students hands-on interactive experiences to “learn by doing.” “Kids learn when they want to learn,” says Morgridge. “In this maker space, kids are learning deeper because it’s relevant to them. Learning is personalized.”

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Pedro Torralba's curator insight, November 28, 2016 2:12 AM
Los jóvenes de este nuevo siglo suelen decir: "vamos a buscarlo en YouTube, a ver cómo se hace". Sabiéndolo, tendremos que ir trasladando el conocimiento de la letra impresa a Internet para dejar de ir a contracorriente.
Silvia Montero's curator insight, November 28, 2016 5:45 PM
#SCEUNED16
Derek Thomas's curator insight, December 2, 2016 11:21 AM
"Learning is personalised ...." interesting ...... ! 
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Computer Coding Game No Computer Needed Superhero Activity

Computer Coding Game No Computer Needed Superhero Activity | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Make your own computer coding game without a computer. Learn basic computer coding skills with a fun superhero computer coding game you can make!

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What to Buy for a Green Screen Classroom

What to Buy for a Green Screen Classroom | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

Are you ready to do green screen in your classroom? This short guide walks you through the basics of what you need to buy, borrow, or build in order to do just that.


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10 Best Make Your Own Robot Kits for Kids

10 Best Make Your Own Robot Kits for Kids | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Being able to create your own robot gives students and kids a great sense of achievement, with the added bonus of allowing children to develop patience, imagination and problems solving skills. There are a number of impressive kids robotics kits on the market that even parents will enjoy playing with. Plus, these types of projects provide valuable bonding time for kids and parents as it’s a toy that both can really relish. In classrooms, robotics are perfect for teaching coding to kids, there are many programmable robot kits that use a simple drag and drop programing language based on Scratch. Making your own robot is also a creative a process, where kids and students utilize their design skills to come up with interesting robot designs. The 10 best make your own robot kits for kids on the market are listed below.

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The Joy of the Maker Movement | Scholastic.com

The Joy of the Maker Movement | Scholastic.com | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Diana Rendina gave her middle schoolers a dream assignment: Create something that can fling something else. One student gleefully constructed a crossbow out of pencils, duct tape, and rubber bands. Another built a catapult from Legos. “It’s organized chaos,” says Rendina, the media specialist at Stewart Middle Magnet School in Tampa, Florida.
Whether you call it organized chaos or joyful learning, that scene illustrates why the maker movement has galvanized teachers and started a mini-revolution in K–8 classrooms. In “making,” kids ponder a question and then tinker their way to an answer. It encourages critical thinking, creativity, and working in teams, and it can incorporate science, technology, engineering, the arts, and math.
Such open-ended exploration may sound expensive and complicated. But maker materials needn’t be high tech; they can be as simple as markers, cardboard, and dollar-store items. And you don’t need a degree in engineering to guide students.

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8 Best Coding Games For Kids

8 Best Coding Games For Kids | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Teach your kids programming with these exciting coding games for kids. Have a look at these best 8 best learn to code games for kids and choose the one your kid will love the most.
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Can Non-makers Lead Maker Spaces and Education? – MakerJawn

Can Non-makers Lead Maker Spaces and Education? – MakerJawn | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
First, we should discuss what a, “Maker” is in the first place. All of us have the potential to be Makers. Adam Savage worded it perfectly, saying, “Humans do two things that make us unique from all other animals; we use tools and we tell stories. And when you make something, you’re doing both at once.”

However, in our recent globalized, hyper-consumer culture less and less people have been taught the skills that enable them to make things. We’re able to buy everything we need – why should we make it ourselves? Making was once a core component of the American middle class. Home Economics was a required class in high school. Times have changed though and being able to make things is a unique skill. But being a Maker is more than technical skill, it is also a mindset.

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What Do Great Makerspaces Have in Common? — Medium @lflemingedu

What Do Great Makerspaces Have in Common? — Medium @lflemingedu | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

Since creating my makerspace and more recently, since publishing my book on makerspaces, I have had the honor of having conversations with, as well as working with, people all across the world. One of the most important lessons I have learned is that….


No two school makerspaces should ever be exactly alike, because no two school communities are ever exactly alike.


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How Libraries Can Turn Stories Into Maker Projects

How Libraries Can Turn Stories Into Maker Projects | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Librarians are developing maker activities for children's books that enhance the reading experience for kids.
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The Guide to Maker Education

The Guide to Maker Education | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
What does maker education look like in today's schools — and how can you bring it into yours? To answer these questions, USC Rossier teamed up with edtech expert and teacher advocate Leah Levy to create "The Guide to Maker Education" — every teacher's handbook for bringing the maker movement into their classroom.

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Transition to Learning Commons

Transition to Learning Commons | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
A traditional library space may be thought of as quiet and standard in it's layout. A Library Learning Commons is a flexible learning area that is often bustlin
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7 Questions I Ask About a Makerspace Tool Before I Embrace It | krissy venosdale

7 Questions I Ask About a Makerspace Tool Before I Embrace It | krissy venosdale | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

With the advertisement of maker-this and maker-that, there are a flood of products claiming to be the “next big thing” you need in your makerspace.  I’ve tried some things I love, somethings I thought fell short, and I’m constantly on the lookout for new ideas, new gadgets, and new ways to use old things.


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GwynethJones's curator insight, December 17, 2016 9:56 AM

Great questions to ask to manage your makerspace!

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Why Should We Teach Programming? - @kodable #hourofcode 

Why Should We Teach Programming? - @kodable #hourofcode  | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Are you on the fence on whether or not you should introduce a programming curriculum next school year?  The easy answer is that you ABSOLUTELY should!  But, for those who are not as easily convinced, we have put together a list of the top 10 reasons why we believe coding should be taught to every child.


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 30, 2016 3:24 AM

Thanks to John Evans.

Norton Gusky's curator insight, December 1, 2016 8:43 AM
It's not about learning how to code; it's about creative problem-solving and design. 
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The jobs of the future – and two skills you need to get them

The jobs of the future – and two skills you need to get them | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

"Could a robot do your job? Millions of people who didn’t see automation coming will soon find out the painful way. The answer is a resounding yes.

The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs study predicts that 5 million jobs will be lost before 2020 as artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology and other socio-economic factors replace the need for human workers.

The good news is that those same technological advances will also create 2.1 million new jobs. But the manual and clerical workers who find themselves out of work are unlikely to have the required skills to compete for the new roles. Most new jobs will be in more specialized areas such as computing, mathematics, architecture and engineering."


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15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

"According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming.

In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. They need this skill not because they’ll all go into it as a career—that isn’t realistic—but because it impacts every career in the 21st-century world. Any country recognizing that will benefit in the long term.

With the following resources, you can teach programming to every student and every age."


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 22, 2016 7:28 PM

Do an Hour of Code Dec. 5-11! Thanks to Yashy Tohsaku. 

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Choosing the Right Products for Your Makerspace - Worlds of Learning

Choosing the Right Products for Your Makerspace - Worlds of Learning | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Many people associate the Maker Movement with the ‘stuff’ things like 3D printers, but in my opinion, this isn’t what pushes children outside of their comfort zone, it is that opportunity for open-ended exploration that is key.  When creating a makerspace, many school districts just go out and buy things that other districts buy, really in essence, just replicating another school districts makerspace.  In my opinion though, no two school makerspaces should be exactly alike because no two school communities are exactly alike.  

In my opinion, every makerspace needs to have their own unique vision and that vision should be written down the form of a mission statement.  That statement will help you convey to others what your makerspace is trying to achieve and to help people better understand your space, but it will also help you be able to better select products that are appropriate and meaningful to your particular makerspace.

In addition to a mission statement, I cannot stress enough the importance of properly planning your makerspace.  

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Susan Kluger's curator insight, November 4, 2016 11:57 AM
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Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols

Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
I am a bit of a collector — some may say hoarder — of craft supplies or anything that I think my kids, myself, or my students can create or build with.  I love to hunt for cool items and I LOVE to get a good deal.  Before recycling or throwing anything away, I think, “What could we make with that?”  I realize that not everyone is like this and some people don’t want to sort through trash to find that cool treasure.  If you think that STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) education is costly, I’m here to let you know it doesn’t have to be. Please let me share some money-saving resources with you to help make incorporating STEAM into your home or classroom easy and affordable.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 11, 2016 9:25 PM

Perfect timing! Thanks to John Evans.

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Motorized Coloring Machine Kids Can Make

Motorized Coloring Machine Kids Can Make | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it

"You know what STEM is right? Science, technology, engineering and math. These are skills that kids really need to have a nice handle on- both boys and girls. We incorporate STEM into our homeschooling as much as possible.


Let me show you how we took the parts from an old broken toy and turned it into a motorized coloring machine. My kids call this coloring of the future!"


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Larry Heuser's curator insight, September 2, 2016 11:54 AM

Homeschooler Alert!!

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Makerspaces on the Spot and on a Dime | TeachOntario

Makerspaces on the Spot and on a Dime | TeachOntario | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
Does the makerspace movement intrigue you? Have a limited budget? Unsure about how to get started? This two week introductory course will examine the role of makerspaces in our schools and how making can augment and supplement curricular learning while adapting to fit students’ needs, interests and readiness. Through various hands on modules, we will tinker with and explore a variety of inexpensive digital and nondigital tools; analyzing and identifying opportunities and barriers to making in the classroom and how they can be used to faciliate student engagement and development. Learning and personal reflection will be curated and collaboration encouraged through the use of several social media platforms that will build your personal learning network of makers. We are all in this together - let's get making!
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Kids at this school can spend 20% of their time doing anything they want

Kids at this school can spend 20% of their time doing anything they want | Design Thinking, Inquiry and Makerspaces | Scoop.it
If it's good enough for Google, it's good enough for high school.
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