iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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6 Amazing High-Resolution Nebula Wallpapers from NASA

6 Amazing High-Resolution Nebula Wallpapers from NASA | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Like many of you, I’m a sucker for fancy new wallpapers of neat looking stuff, and if there’s one place that routinely cranks out some of the most mind-blowing amazing imagery that is perfect for wallpapers, it’s NASA."

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iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education
News, reviews, resources for  iPads, Maker Education, Coding and more ....
Curated by John Evans
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Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) | MindShift | KQED News

Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) | MindShift | KQED News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
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A teenage brain is a fascinating, still-changing place. There's a lot going on: social awareness, risk-taking, peer pressure; all are heightened during this period.

Until relatively recently, it was thought that the brain was only actively developing during childhood, but in the last two decades, researchers have confirmed that the brain continues to develop during adolescence — a period of time that can stretch from the middle school years into early adulthood.

"We were always under the assumption that the brain doesn't change very much after childhood," explains Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at University College London.

But that's simply not the case, she says, and educators — and teens themselves — can learn a lot from this.
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Show What You Know: The Shift To Competency - FORBES

Show What You Know: The Shift To Competency - FORBES | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
G.P.A.’s are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless,” said Laszlo Bock, former head of HR at Google. “Google famously used to ask everyone for a transcript and G.P.A.’s and test scores, but we don’t anymore, unless you’re just a few years out of school. We found that they don’t predict anything,” added Bock.

In the now famous 2013 interview with the New York Times, Bock signaled the beginning of the end of courses and credits as the primary measure of learning and the beginning of the show what you know era.

Professions (including law, real estate, and accounting) have long relied on test-based measured of readiness. Some professions have gone a step beyond to require demonstrated competence (e.g., doctors and pilots are required to pass tests, endure simulations, and perform in a variety of live settings).


In dynamic job categories including information technology (as Bock notes), hiring is increasingly based on demonstrated skills--a portfolio of referenced work-- rather than transcripts and grades. Learning in these rapidly evolving fields is often online or blended, modular, and delivered in quick sprints in new formats like coding bootcamps or nanodegrees.

If the world is heading towards demonstrated competency over traditional pedigrees and there is a new opportunity to accelerate individual learning pathways, what does it mean for traditional education?
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Google Science Journal: A lab in your pocket — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

Google Science Journal: A lab in your pocket — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
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Sometimes an app truly demonstrates the power of mobile.

Google’s Science Journal app transforms your mobile device into a little science laboratory, encouraging students to conduct authentic experiments, collect and visualize data and record observations from the world around them. Use it to  enhance learning in your classrooms and in the field, and to facilitate the development of your own citizen scientists.
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3 Ways the Maker Movement Can Be More Inclusive of Women and People of Color | EdSurge News

Recently, I have been talking with teachers about their perspectives on the inclusion of women and people of color in making and maker education. These conversations have been both interesting and frustrating.

As a teacher and a woman of color, I am interested in shaping a Maker movement that reflects the diversity of people interested in creating, building, hacking, and tinkering.
Although most of the educators I know who self-identify as makers are women, some of them cite a lack of women in STEM fields and related pursuits as the very reason they are now makers. They are trying to change the landscape by encouraging young women and girls to become makers also. When I speak with people of color with about making, some discuss the lack of diversity when attending maker events. They rarely, if ever, see themselves represented.

As a teacher and a woman of color, I am interested in shaping a Maker movement that reflects the diversity of people interested in creating, building, hacking, and tinkering. Here is how this can happen:
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K12 students code beyond computers #computationalthinking

K12 students code beyond computers #computationalthinking | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
How do you ensure students who excel at math remain engaged? Heidi Williams intended to solve that challenge by starting an after-school coding club while she was a gifted-and-talented teacher at Bayside Middle School near Milwaukee.

Instead of using pen and paper, her students created an interactive children’s book on Scratch, the MIT Media Lab coding suite that lets users create games, stories and simulations. And the more of this kind of coding activity they did, the better their math test scores got.

Now a computer science curriculum specialist at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Williams researches this correlation. One possibility is that the computational thinking skills developed while coding help students break down complicated problems—on and off computers, she says.
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Project Torino - An inclusive physical programming language for children with vision impairments #computationalthinking #coding

Project Torino - An inclusive physical programming language for children with vision impairments #computationalthinking #coding | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Because technology is embedded in every aspect of daily life, computer science education in schools is a growing focus. In recent years, there’s a movement to teach children both computational thinking as well as how to code. This drive has motivated the development of programming languages specifically for children, so they can learn coding both within and outside of school. The vast majority of these existing languages require vision to either enter code (for example, through drag and drop) or experience the result of running the code (such as by watching an animation of robots moving). As a result, there are no programming languages for children that work for those with no or low vision.

In this project, we are designing a physical programming language for teaching computational thinking skills and basic programming concepts to children ages 7–11, regardless of their level of vision. To do so, this project follows a user-centered design approach, using iterative development and deployment of prototype technology with targeted users. The result will help children of all visual abilities acquire important computational thinking skills, and provide learning experiences that are imaginative, engaging, and fun for all.
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5 Tools to Teach Coding to Late Elementary Students - Tech Learning

5 Tools to Teach Coding to Late Elementary Students - Tech Learning | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Let's talk about computer science. It's an area where we need more and more people that know what they are doing. To get those people, we are going to have to teach it in schools, and thankfully many schools and states are moving that way. 

I think coding is best taught as we would teach a world language. The younger we start students, the better off they will be. There are tools out there that allow students to code with arrows and with lines, but eventually, students are going to have to move into block coding. That's where this post focuses on!
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Kids are not better at technology than adults. – George Couros @gcouros

Kids are not better at technology than adults. – George Couros @gcouros | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
The term “digital immigrants” and “digital natives” is almost as annoying as the fights are about the terminology.  These terms are often credited to Marc Prensky, and from when I have had the opportunity to have heard him speak, he doesn’t believe that kids have an innate ability to use technology over adults. They have not known a world with anything different.  It made sense to me when I thought of my parents who came to Canada as immigrants. They knew one life and then thrust themselves into another. Where growing up in Canada, I have not known anything but what it is like to live in that country.  It doesn’t mean that one group has the ability over another, but their past experiences do shape a lot of what their future looks like. Although my parents were immigrants to Canada, I saw them as less traditional than many people who lived here their entire life.  

So then why do we continue to say things like, “Kids are sooooo much better with technology than adults are”?  Yes, many kids have never known anything BUT a world with iPhones and YouTube, but the same adults have lived in that world the same amount of time kids have, and sometimes, even more.  Add the years of experience in other parts of life; there is no reason that kids should be better at technology than adults.

The difference between kids that are deemed better than adults with technology is not some innate ability; it is their willingness to push buttons. To see what happens. To act on their curiosity.12  That’s it.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 19, 12:38 AM

Thanks to John Evans. This is one of those "myths" that are holding us back. 

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Exploring Ancient History With Video Games - Edutopia

Exploring Ancient History With Video Games - Edutopia | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Far from being a modern phenomenon, fake news dates back to antiquity. Julius Caesar, for example, was not only a brilliant strategist, but also a crafty spin doctor who controlled the historical narrative by writing volumes about his own military exploits. And he was not above making tactical omissions and reporting alternative facts.

This is why historians don’t take primary sources at face value. They read between the lines and look at multiple perspectives to reconstruct the past. By teaching students to think like historians, we arm them with the critical thinking tools that will help them sift fake from fact—an essential 21st-century skill.
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Machine Learning is Fun! Part 4: Modern Face Recognition with Deep Learning

Machine Learning is Fun! Part 4: Modern Face Recognition with Deep Learning | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Update: This article is part of a series. Check out the full series: Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5Part 6Part 7 and Part 8!


Have you noticed that Facebook has developed an uncanny ability to recognize your friends in your photographs? In the old days, Facebook used to make you to tag your friends in photos by clicking on them and typing in their name. Now as soon as you upload a photo, Facebook tags everyone for you like magic:"

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The Library Voice: Gum and Candy Wrappers In Your Makerspace? Sounds Like A Fun Idea To Me! @shannonmmiller

The Library Voice: Gum and Candy Wrappers In Your Makerspace? Sounds Like A Fun Idea To Me! @shannonmmiller | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
My friend Sandi shared this post on creating gum wrapper chains today on her Facebook.  

I loved making these and it is always fun to find things people have created with gum and candy wrappers.

It made me think....Wouldn't it be fun to add gum and candy wrappers to your Makerspace with a bunch of ideas for your students to make their own creations too?  

It ties in recycling, repurposing, creativity and fun all into one!  Just make sure the candy is peanut free please. 
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This Robot Could One Day Help Hospital Patients Get Dressed

This Robot Could One Day Help Hospital Patients Get Dressed | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Georgia Tech is developing a robot that could eventually be used to dress humans in hospitals and elderly homes. According to the university, 'More than 1 million Americans require daily physical assistance to get dressed because of injury, disease and advanced age.

To address this problem researchers are developing a robot that can successfully slide on hospital gowns on people’s arms. The machine uses its understanding of force to guide the cloth over the patient's hands, around their arms, and onto the shoulder."

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Free Technology for Teachers: A Fun Game for Learning About #Physics @rmbyrne

Free Technology for Teachers: A Fun Game for Learning About #Physics @rmbyrne | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Simple Machines is a fun game from the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Simple Machines is a game that is designed to help students learn about the basic physics principles involved in the use of levels, pulleys, planes, axles, and wheels. The object of the game is to help a robot character named Twitch gather the pieces needed to make a simple machine. In order to gather the pieces students have to help Twitch climb over objects using inclined planes, roll to objects as efficiently as possible, and lift objects by using pulleys and levers.

 

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The Ultimate How-To Guide for Chromebook Beginners - MakeUseOf.com

The Ultimate How-To Guide for Chromebook Beginners - MakeUseOf.com | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Chromebooks have deservedly earned a reputation for being easy-to-use, even for people who aren’t technologically savvy. Chromebooks aren’t just perfect for students, they’re also solid options for seniors.

But just because the operating system is straightforward, it doesn’t mean there aren’t some parts of it that require further explanation. Without further ado, here’s an ultimate how-to guide for your Chromebook.
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Why Are We So Scared of Robots? 15 Experts Weigh in on What the Real Dangers Are

Why Are We So Scared of Robots? 15 Experts Weigh in on What the Real Dangers Are | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Whether you're excited about it or not, robots and artificial intelligence are an inevitable part of a future that we're fast approaching. Thanks to books and films littered with rogue A.I.s and malevolent robots, some people are understandably a bit frightened by the prospect of a world overrun by such technologies.

They're not alone, as many experts across fields as diverse as technology and economics are also expressing their fears over the rise of the robots. While these fears are certainly valid, it's important to note that these concerns are being voiced in the hopes that technology can be improved, not prohibited.

Here are just some of the pressing concerns regarding robots and A.I.s that experts want to see addressed before the new era of technology commences."

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How Helping Students to Ask Better Questions Can Transform Classrooms | MindShift | KQED News

How Helping Students to Ask Better Questions Can Transform Classrooms | MindShift | KQED News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
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Educators and parents have long known that curiosity is at the center of powerful learning. But too often, in the push to meet standards and pressure to stay on pace, that essential truth about learning that sticks gets lost. Worse, many older students have forgotten how to ask their own questions about the world, afraid that if they wonder they will be wrong. It’s far less risky to sit back and wait for the teacher to ask the questions. And yet, good questioning may be the most basic tenet of lifelong learning and independent thinking that school offers students. Taking the time to activate curiosity doesn’t have to mean abandoning learning standards, nor is it necessarily a waste of time.
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Teachers Guide to Using QR Codes in Instruction - Educator's Technology

Teachers Guide to Using QR Codes in Instruction - Educator's Technology | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"For those of you who haven't seen it yet, here is a handy visual featuring 10 easy ways to help you  integrate the power of QR codes in your instruction. We have also included a list of resources at the end of this post so you can learn more about educational potential of QR codes in education"

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Project Torino - An inclusive physical programming language for children with vision impairments #computationalthinking #coding

Project Torino - An inclusive physical programming language for children with vision impairments #computationalthinking #coding | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Because technology is embedded in every aspect of daily life, computer science education in schools is a growing focus. In recent years, there’s a movement to teach children both computational thinking as well as how to code. This drive has motivated the development of programming languages specifically for children, so they can learn coding both within and outside of school. The vast majority of these existing languages require vision to either enter code (for example, through drag and drop) or experience the result of running the code (such as by watching an animation of robots moving). As a result, there are no programming languages for children that work for those with no or low vision.

In this project, we are designing a physical programming language for teaching computational thinking skills and basic programming concepts to children ages 7–11, regardless of their level of vision. To do so, this project follows a user-centered design approach, using iterative development and deployment of prototype technology with targeted users. The result will help children of all visual abilities acquire important computational thinking skills, and provide learning experiences that are imaginative, engaging, and fun for all.
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Use This Simple Trick to Preserve Battery Life on iPhone by Stopping “Searching…”

Use This Simple Trick to Preserve Battery Life on iPhone by Stopping “Searching…” | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
If you’re traveling through areas of weak cellular signals and generally poor reception, you can save a significant amount of iPhone battery life simply by toggling the AirPlane Mode feature on. That may sound weird, but it really works, with the idea being that when an iPhone has an intermittent cell signal, the cellular modem continuously searches for another available cell tower, which happens to use a lot of battery power. Thus, the solution is to simply stop the iPhone from looking for a cell signal if you’re not going to have one anyway.
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The Future Is Knit: Why the Ancient Art of Knitting Is High-Tech Again - Gizmodo

The Future Is Knit: Why the Ancient Art of Knitting Is High-Tech Again - Gizmodo | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
hen you think about knitting, you might picture grandmas clicking big wooden needles or something wintery, like a snow-covered lodge. But knitting is everywhere, producing just about everything you put against your skin each day, from socks and t-shirts to hoodies and beanies. And thousands of years after it was first invented, new kinds of knitting are poised to fundamentally change how we think about these “basics,” making our bodies more connected than ever to the computerized world we live in.

Today, you can buy a $40 dress from Uniqlo that was produced by a knitting machine in one piece with no cutting or sewing—which means no seams and almost no wasted fabric. This “seamless” or “whole garment” knitting technique was first developed in Japan 20 years ago, but high costs have prevented it from hitting the mainstream until recently. The machines work something like 3D printers for clothes: yarn is loaded in, the machine is programmed, and out comes a full garment.
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The Makers of Tomorrow – Dale Dougherty – Medium

The Makers of Tomorrow – Dale Dougherty – Medium | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Now that we have more ways for students to get into making, we also need to explore the potential outcomes for those who become makers. We’re hosting our first-ever Industry, Career and College Day in partnership with Cornell University College of Engineering and San Mateo College. The speakers on the program will talk about preparing for the future of work. It will also be an opportunity for young people to meet representatives from startups, companies, colleges and universities, to explore career paths, and evaluate new possibilities for their education and future.
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Make Your Own QR Coasters! – Tinkercad Blog #makered

Make Your Own QR Coasters! – Tinkercad Blog #makered | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Here’s a fun project using Tinkercad that also serves a very handy purpose. These clever QR code coasters can give out your home WiFi information for an automatic login, perfect for any party by giving guests access without them having to ask. All people have to do is scan the code with their phones and they are automatically logged into your WiFi.
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5 Tips for Makers on a Budget from a Teen Librarian - School Library Journal

5 Tips for Makers on a Budget from a Teen Librarian - School Library Journal | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Like many librarians, I am asked to do library programming for teens, but without a large budget to make this happen. When I went to my administration and asked about turning my teen space into a maker space, money was a huge concern. We don’t have a lot of the high-tech gadgets that can be found in a lot of traditional maker spaces, but we do have a really great space. Here are some tips that helped us with our teen making and programming on a budget.
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Free Technology for Teachers: The Science of Cookies

Free Technology for Teachers: The Science of Cookies | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
I love cookies! In fact, I just had two warm chocolate chip cookies for dessert tonight. I bet that you have a student or twenty that enjoys cookies too. TED-Ed has a fun lesson that you can use to teach some science concepts through cookies. In the TED-Ed lesson about the chemistry of cookies students learn why you shouldn't eat raw dough, the temperature at which salmonella is killed, why cookies spread-out (or don't spread if the dough is not correct), and what our noses tell us about cookies.

 

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Free Technology for Teachers: How #Coffee Affects Your Brain @rmbyrne

Free Technology for Teachers: How #Coffee Affects Your Brain @rmbyrne | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

Like millions of people, I start my day by brewing coffee. On those rare days when I discover we're out of coffee at home, it can totally throw my morning out of wack. Heck, I even pick hotel rooms based on whether or not they have in-room coffee makers. In other words, I'm addicted to coffee. What is it about coffee that gives it so much power in our lives?

 

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